which TAMA SLP or Starphonic snare for home practice

I'm a big Tama snare fan, for obvious price vs. reward reasons :)
At rehearsals I use a Dynamic Bronze SLP(very nice, quite loud, retrofitted with the missing good strainers from Starphonic or other SLP-s), but is a bit heavy to carry all the time, so I just live it there.
At home I use a heavily taped Mapex Tomahawk, I kinda hate it,is very loud, is good for nothing, except metal music, for stage.
I need something more mellow sounding, maybe thinner wood shell, which does not overwhelms my own monitoring mix.

I'm thinking between: Fat Spruce, Bold Spotted Gum, Classic Maple(sounds ok, but not so much character), G Walnut (nice lows, but could be loud), G Maple, G Bubinga (not availbale anymore), maybe Starphonic Bubinga( too expensive for practice..)
but in the meantime I like a lot the Acrolite, or the Tamcrolites: Dry Aluminium SLP, or Starphonic
I'm not sure, if I want another metal shell again, but the Acrolite sound is the "reference sound"in my head.

I'm not sure what to choose for practice/study any style of music.
A lot of nice SLP-s, are with "G" in the name, so I expect loud, but with the thinner shells I have to wrestle more overtones.
What would be the all rounder, SLP practice snare ?
 
Have you tried some other heads (Evans HD Dry for example) and wires with less strands already?
Do you hit very hard and use large sticks at home? Maybe you can make your current snare work.
 
Have you tried some other heads (Evans HD Dry for example) and wires with less strands already?
Do you hit very hard and use large sticks at home? Maybe you can make your current snare work.
I have Evans HeavyWeight on it, worst scenario, probably :) (HD Dry I use it on the Dynamic Bronze). yeah, probably I can tame it, but that's not the point, I want something new, which sounds nice, and goes with lighter music too
 
I would go Fat Spruce.. It has a softer sound IMO..... but still has character and warmth. ... These snares are an incredible value.. with the solid brass lugs and really cool strainer.
I admit, I'm thinking between the Spruce and Spotted Gum. I read here and on on YT, that some people returned the Spruce, in favor of the Gum. tunes more easily, more controlled(10lugs), similar sound
 

Bonzo_CR

Silver Member
I vote for the Dry Aluminium. It sounds fab, is well built and has a wide tuning range. Lightweight too!
I have a coated Emperor on mine and it sounds better than my Supra.
 

SomeBadDrummer

Well-known member
You didn’t mention a budget, but you might want to consider a Starclassic 14 x 5.5 walnut/birch. Fantastic snare drum for the money. Used start around 300, or brand new for around 400.
 

Neal Pert

Well-known member
The best quiet drum is the one you play quietly. The best low-overtone drum is a drum you've set up to have fewer overtones. There are famous jazz drummers known for their delicate touch who use 8" deep wood snare drums, shallow metal drums, black beauties, Sonor Signature bubingas, etc. Almost all of what makes a drum loud and ring vs. quiet and dry has to do with how you hit the drum and how you've set the drum up.

So, I mean, my suggestion is that you get the SLP you think will be cool. Every one of them could work for your purposes if you set the drum up right and don't hit it too hard. If you want a wood drum that's on the mellow side I'd be looking for something with (1) a thin shell, (2) a roundover bearing edge, and a distant (3) a wood type that's low on the Anker hardness scale,

The wisdom of just getting a versatile drum and using head selection and tuning to get the vibe you want should be obvious. If you BUY an idiosyncratic drum, it'll always sound idiosyncratic in the same way. If you buy a pretty average drum you can make it sound however you'd like.

I'd probably get the Kapur drum, with the aluminum, hickory and spruce drums in the mix.
 
You didn’t mention a budget, but you might want to consider a Starclassic 14 x 5.5 walnut/birch. Fantastic snare drum for the money. Used start around 300, or brand new for around 400.
I'm between 300-400, I've listened to them, all 4 variants. Sweet, but in Europe a bit more expensive. What is a pity Tama puts the simple strainer on them, whereas on some much cheaper SLP, you can get the linear strainer, and the extra strainer/remover. but retrofitting possible.
 

cbphoto

Gold Member
I'm a big Tama snare fan, for obvious price vs. reward reasons :)
At rehearsals I use a Dynamic Bronze SLP(very nice, quite loud...
...
I need something more mellow sounding, maybe thinner wood shell, which does not overwhelms my own monitoring mix.
Since you’re using a metal snare, but want “mellow”, I recommend the Dry Aluminum. When Tama labeled it “Classic” they were spot on. It is very similar to an Acrolite.

Regarding your wood candidates, the Spotted Gum wood is very hard (2473 lbf. on the Janka scale). Much harder than maple (1450 lbf.), hickory and bubinga (1980 lbf.). This means that when it’s tuned properly, it will have the attack of a metal shell with its own natural harmonics that are bright—but different—from a metal shell.

Last year, while quarantined and bored, I made this short video of my Starphonic Spotted Gum snare. Its tuning range is very wide.


I also made this comparison video of the Starphonic Aluminum and Classic Dry Aluminum:


And here’s some Spotted Gum eye candy for you:

057E1AF4-02C4-46A2-A1D2-AE349D809DCA.jpeg
 
@Neal Pert: I totally agree, it's clear I have to focus more on my skills. I'm just the freshman who played once, a galaxy black Acrolite, with a big smile on his face, thinking "I like so much it's ringing, why use any dampening"
Maybe I"ll buy one, sometime, but also the one I've tested, had HW issues. Tama does not.
Everytime I relisten, all of them from the proposed list, somehow always I come back to the SLP Dry Aluminum 14x5,5".
Maybe, is the closest to the aforementioned experience.
For some could be a student drum, but to my ears has that non invasive tok+ring, which is easily completes any musical mix, except extreme metal.
 
Agree with neal pert, but if you want something different, I can understand that too. The pearl sensitone aluminium or a premier aluminum might be other options that won't break the bank.
 

Neal Pert

Well-known member
@Neal Pert: I totally agree, it's clear I have to focus more on my skills. I'm just the freshman who played once, a galaxy black Acrolite, with a big smile on his face, thinking "I like so much it's ringing, why use any dampening"
Maybe I"ll buy one, sometime, but also the one I've tested, had HW issues. Tama does not.
Everytime I relisten, all of them from the proposed list, somehow always I come back to the SLP Dry Aluminum 14x5,5".
Maybe, is the closest to the aforementioned experience.
For some could be a student drum, but to my ears has that non invasive tok+ring, which is easily completes any musical mix, except extreme metal.

I think the Dry Aluminum would be great. Everybody needs an acrolite-type drum, and happily a lot of companies make them. Mine is the Yamaha Recording Custom and it's my favorite metal drum I own. I haven't played the SLP Dry Aluminum but I watched a lot of YouTube videos of those drums when I was thinking of switching to Tama. They sound fantastic and I'm sure they're extremely versatile drums! Sounds like you have your answer.

If you eventually get an Acrolite, the good news is that replacement hardware-- including a number of different strainers-- is readily available. Just find a clean one where everything works, put a better strainer on it, and use it for the rest of your life.
 
@cbphoto : I'm already familiar with you're aluminium comparison :) Watched also in 2019, when I decided to go with the Bronze. Which one you keep ?
Back then, bubinga, aluminium and bronze were in competition.
This year is more between aluminium, fat spruce, spotted gum.
(get yourself a new SLP every year, I read this slogan somewhere :) ).
This Starphonic spotted gum didn't know about, really yummie, you starting me. I would use more teh low-medium range
 

cbphoto

Gold Member
@cbphoto : I'm already familiar with you're aluminium comparison :) Watched also in 2019, when I decided to go with the Bronze. Which one you keep ?
Back then, bubinga, aluminium and bronze were in competition.
This year is more between aluminium, fat spruce, spotted gum.
(get yourself a new SLP every year, I read this slogan somewhere :) ).
This Starphonic spotted gum didn't know about, really yummie, you starting me. I would use more teh low-medium range
I kept the Starphonic Aluminum because a local drummer made me a great offer on the SLP Dry Aluminum. It was also my first drum after using only a Starclassic Brass for 10 years and my ears loved the new sound.

I think the primary sonic difference between the Starphonic Aluminum and SLP Aluminum is due to the shell height (6.5" vs. 5.5"), not the hoops.

All three of your nominees (aluminum, spruce, spotted gum) are very different from each other. I don't think you can make a bad decision here. 👍
 
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