Which Manufacturer Has The Worst Marketing?

NerfLad

Silver Member
(Inspired by some of the discussion in the thread about Recording Customs)

Which manufacturer do you think has the worst marketing? I don't necessarily mean the least marketing; it could be ineffective, poorly targeted or executed, or just personally rub you the wrong way.

I want to hear your opinions before I give my vote.
 

Andy

Administrator
Staff member
I was about to vote for Guru, as our marketing budget is zero right now, & the website's in a mess :( Glad we got the exclusion ;)

As far as existing marketing efforts, my vote goes to any company that puts up a video that gives the impression of something simply & honestly recorded, but actually processes the hell out of it. I completely get why they do it, & it's no different to the photo's you see of McDonalds burgers compared to the reality, but it still annoys the crap out of me. They do it, because customers believe it, & it gets sales. We then have to sweep up the mess on the forum by answering "how can I get my drums to sound like ----- ?"

(Inspired by some of the discussion in the thread about Recording Customs)

Which manufacturer do you think has the worst marketing? I don't necessarily mean the least marketing; it could be ineffective, poorly targeted or executed, or just personally rub you the wrong way.

I want to hear your opinions before I give my vote.
 

tamadrm

Platinum Member
There was a young man who posted here last year about his cymbals being the next new sound.The copy read like it was written by a 12 year old fan boy.

One of his big selling points was.."why would you buy a cymbal who's name you can't pronounce"

There was another reference to how old this particular company was,and how old fashioned their ideas were,and thier cymbals couldn't be used to play " todays" music.

I can't remember the name of the company and before posting,I did a search for all known cymbals makers.Nothing rang a bell so I guess that targeting buyers who's parents buy their cymbals stratagy failed.Gee,I wonder why?

Steve B
 
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bermuda

Drummerworld Pro Drummer - Administrator
Staff member
The answer will vary based on the age and preferred genres of a given drummer. There are undoubtedly negative aspects that could be found with any major or boutique company's marketing efforts.

I 'get' that some companies are successful aiming ads & product towards certain age groups (young or old) and genres, so I can't fault anyone for trying to appeal to a target market. I'm not sure that any company actually has something for every drummer.

But my pet peave has more to do with how a company handles their artist roster. I am thoroughly unimpressed with a long list of independent unknowns, or players in local bands. This tactic is prevalent with the small builders or cymbal companies, and I have no doubt that the players like their products and are thrilled to be listed on the company's site. But simply listing customers as ensorsers (or artists) leaves doubt whether any working pros - drummers who really depend on a product's sound and construction - actually use the product. A few pros are seen on small company sites, and some small companies have brief yet impressive artists rosters. But largely, these companies try to look like they have a big presence in the market, and the lists look unimpressive. To me, anyway.

Of course, I also understand that nor every drummer views those lists of customers like I do, and that younger players may be more impressed that up-and-coming players are using a brand, as opposed to the usual, typically older drummers who they consider out of touch, or maybe compensated by certain companies.

Everyone is different.

Bermuda
 

Andy

Administrator
Staff member
There was a young man who posted here last year about his cymbals being the next new sound.The copy read like it was written by a 12 year old fan boy.

One of his big selling points was.."why would you buy a cymbal who's name you can't pronounce"

There was another reference to how old this particular company was,and how old fashioned their ideas were,and thier cymbals couldn't be used to play " todays" music.

I can't remember the name of the company and before posting,I did a search for all known cymbals makers.Nothing rang a bell so I guess the targeting buyers who's parents buy their cymbals stratagy failed.Gee,I wonder why?

Steve B
Yes, I remember him Steve. Didn't he also make reference to buying a cymbal from a company who's founder is dead! Nice message!!!!!!!!
 

tamadrm

Platinum Member
I was about to vote for Guru, as our marketing budget is zero right now, & the website's in a mess :( Glad we got the exclusion ;)

As far as existing marketing efforts, my vote goes to any company that puts up a video that gives the impression of something simply & honestly recorded, but actually processes the hell out of it. I completely get why they do it, & it's no different to the photo's you see of McDonalds burgers compared to the reality, but it still annoys the crap out of me. They do it, because customers believe it, & it gets sales. We then have to sweep up the mess on the forum by answering "how can I get my drums to sound like ----- ?"
It reminds me of a story about PT Barnum.He one time,purchased thousands of cases of white salmon,thinking they were pink salmon.He got them at an outragously low price,and all he could see were dollar signs.

Realizing his folly,and being the Spin Doctor and pitch mand he was.....he came up with"White Salmon...guranteed not to go pink in the can".You can guess the rest.

What happened in the 80's when the 2.3mm hoop was born?"Our hoops are "Better" that everyone elses".Drummer believed it then,and some still do now.Just hang better,or scientific,or strongest or any superlative on it ,and pay a pro to push it,and then some under the table money to an "objective" drum magazine to write a glowing review of said product,and chances are,you'll have a winner.

It pisses me off too.The only answer I can see is outside investors,but that's a whole other can of worms.What's that saying about lying with dogs?

In your case it's really a shame,since your drums really ARE something special.

Things will pick up Andy.Your stuff is just too good not to.Cheers

Steve B
 

Andy

Administrator
Staff member
But my pet peave has more to do with how a company handles their artist roster. I am thoroughly unimpressed with a long list of independent unknowns, or players in local bands. This tactic is prevalent with the small builders or cymbal companies, and I have no doubt that the players like their products and are thrilled to be listed on the company's site. But simply listing customers as ensorsers (or artists) leaves doubt whether any working pros - drummers who really depend on a product's sound and construction - actually use the product. A few pros are seen on small company sites, and some small companies have brief yet impressive artists rosters.

Of course, I also understand that nor every drummer views those lists of customers like I do, and that younger players may be more impressed that up-and-coming players are using a brand, as opposed to the usual, typically older drummers who they consider out of touch, or maybe compensated by certain companies.

Everyone is different.

Bermuda
I agree with this. Our artist list is short, but consists exclusively of pro drummers. They're not top tier guys, because we're not in a position to offer true global support, but in each case, they're regular working pro's. much more importantly, they're players who utterly believe they are playing the best instrument for them, & in every case, without exception, they've bought drums from us before appearing on our list. No artist gets free gear, both on principal, & also, we can't afford to do it. Our list is currently being updated, so will transform from very short, to quite short, over the coming weeks ;)
 

tamadrm

Platinum Member
Yes, I remember him Steve. Didn't he also make reference to buying a cymbal from a company who's founder is dead! Nice message!!!!!!!!
Yes...how can you buy a cymbal from a company those founder has been dead for years.That was just marketing geuius right there...lol

Steve B.
 
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GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
There was a young man who posted here last year about his cymbals being the next new sound.The copy read like it was written by a 12 year old fan boy.

One of his big selling points was.."why would you buy a cymbal who's name you can't pronounce"

There was another reference to how old this particular company was,and how old fashioned their ideas were,and thier cymbals couldn't be used to play " todays" music.

I can't remember the name of the company and before posting,I did a search for all known cymbals makers.Nothing rang a bell so I guess that targeting buyers who's parents buy their cymbals stratagy failed.Gee,I wonder why?

Steve B

"...from a company those founder has been dead for years." Makes me wonder how that old dead guy Henry Ford is doing



Good recall. I remember this guy. Haven't heard from him since. Guess he's busy making cymbals
 

MisterZero

Senior Member
this may sound silly, but I lost interest in Sonor Delite series drums, because I thought the nam was dumb....It wasn't like I was going to buy them, thought of the name, then decided against it, but I didn't want a set of "delites" ....just my .02
 

Andy

Administrator
Staff member
this may sound silly, but I lost interest in Sonor Delite series drums, because I thought the nam was dumb....It wasn't like I was going to buy them, thought of the name, then decided against it, but I didn't want a set of "delites" ....just my .02
Seriously? Wow.........
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
I'd say Peace.

If you go to NAMM, and look at their drums, they appear to be as every bit as good as Pearl/Tama/Mapex, etc. They have some impressive finishes, and nice features.

Yet, they have almost no sales force. No one carries them. They don't even try to land name endorsers.

And even at NAMM, they have a huge booth every year, but no sales people that really speak English well, and the people are do man the booth seem to duck and hide any time anyone walks into their booth.
 
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8Mile

Platinum Member
I wouldn't let the name stop me from buying a set of them, because they're great drums, but I agree that Delite is a brutal brand name. The marketing team really sh** the bed on that one.
 

Arky

Platinum Member
Well I'm a German - maybe exactly this disqualifies me from judging that Delite is a crappy model name - but I think it's a cool idea. Now if the name alone makes some people stay away from them - don't buy them. I do wonder why somebody deemed it right to even drop that term Delite in this thread. Please tell us what makes this designation so bad marketing-wise.
 
N

nhzoso

Guest
I can't stand the way Pearl has a thousand different models of the vision brand.. I saw someone selling a a vsx, and stumbled on like 10 different versions.
vlx vmx, vbx, vbl,vml,vb,vsx, vba, vbl,vx,. They do it to some extent with the masters series too, I know mostly it means maple, and birch, but it just seems so unnecesarily cluttered and confusing the way they name em.

I agree also that Peace does not do enough and on the same note Taye as well.
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
What's a hug booth?........
I'd like to buy a vowel. Can I have an E please?

No, wait, they have a hug booth. You walk in, and a Peace representative gives you a hug, but won't tell you anything about their drums. They market on the assumption that personal contact outweighs actual information.
[end joke]
 

Andy

Administrator
Staff member
I'd like to buy a vowel. Can I have an E please?

No, wait, they have a hug booth. You walk in, and a Peace representative gives you a hug, but won't tell you anything about their drums. They market on the assumption that personal contact outweighs actual information.
[end joke]
Ok, I think I'm getting that. Agreed, a store/exhibition booth that's manned by sales guys who's knowledge is lacking, is most frustrating, & shortsighted on the part of the manufacturer. It echo's my very fear of retail environment regarding our drums.
 

8Mile

Platinum Member
Well I'm a German - maybe exactly this disqualifies me from judging that Delite is a crappy model name - but I think it's a cool idea. Now if the name alone makes some people stay away from them - don't buy them. I do wonder why somebody deemed it right to even drop that term Delite in this thread. Please tell us what makes this designation so bad marketing-wise.
Delite is a play on the English word delight. It's really just not an appropriate name for an upper-echelon drum set. Synonyms for delight include words like enchantment, glee and joy. It's too emo.
 
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