Which electric drum kit to get?

Mr_Runner

Well-known member
Hi I was thinking of getting a new electric drum kit. I've been checking it out a bit but stuff has been coming up which has been complicating the situation (as usual quite a bit of the time) so I thought I'd perhaps try a few forums and perhaps try to get some other opinions and thoughts on it if that was ok.

I'm in the Uk near Doncaster area and what I've found a bit so far is that the Internet and drum shops generally seem better if you know what kit you're after. From what I've seen not that many shops seem to have a selection of kits from the different makes so that you could at least attempt to get a feel for the different makes in terms of what you're looking for in a kit. I can understand this though and for several reasons. However I think if you haven't got loads of experience and you're spending a good bit of money you need to at least try a kit and see how it fits in with whatever you're trying to do. It could be a pity that Electro shut down.

Anyway I've been checking out PMT stores and more specifically up North and Leeds as I heard they had a good few kits on display and thought a good place to start. I checked out the Roland TD-KVX as I heard this model had a 3 zone ride (including the bell function) and a more mechanical hi-hat setup that required a physical hi-hat stand. I currently have a KAT KT2 kit that has a 2 zone ride and a loose hi-hat wire connected pedal setup if you have seen these cheaper hi-hat setups I think. I looked into getting a 3 zone ride for my KT2 but I heard that none are compatible with my module so I bought a second hand acoustic ride cymbal and stand and use that where I need to use the bell. I also bought a hi-hat stand and some acoustic hi-hats for a physical mechanical acoustic setup but I stopped using that as it could have been making my hearing worse. I have some hearing loss in one ear which may have been due to the use of an acoustic kit many years ago and when I was very young as I wasn't using ear protection for about a year or less. I started using ear protection after this for a bit before not playing the drums any longer. Stupid yes but I was very young and it was a long time ago and hopefully I'm not as stupid as I was. With the hi-hat stuff I was using some ok over headphones into my module and also some Zildjian ear plugs as well underneath to hopefully provide the protection. It didn't seem to work out that well though - the plugs worked themselves loose despite me fitting them correctly and I was concerned about my already damaged hearing. I got it setup not too bad though in terms of getting the volume levels ok with it all so I could hear everything but with nothing being too loud or quiet and hopefully also providing some protection. I think my ears like my eyes don't like stuff being put in them although the eyes are probably worse in this respect in respect to contact lenses as you'd probably expect. As part of trying to keep my KAT KT2 setup with the physical mechanical acoustic hi-hats I was going to look into if there are any over headphones that could go into my module but also provide protection in regards to the acoustic ride and hi-hats? I'm not sure if such things exist and I realise they would probably be more expensive if they did. Ones that could be similar and some that are used with shooting louder guns I think are ones that decrease the noise from the guns (and also probably provide more and better protection perhaps) but you can still hear someone talking to you although they may need to be closer but I don't know about this as I've never used them for this. It's like selective noise / sound / frequency perhaps kind of technology and I was wondering if there are any like this for drummers for the stuff I discussed above regarding this. It could be needed for hybrid type drum setups?

Anyway (again) I have tried a lot of things including everything above to keep my KAT KT2 going but I think I have come to the end of the road with it (I've been here before recently) as there are also a few other things with it which could affect my performance for a Rockschool grade 4 exam if I ever get to exam standard. I thought after recent events which I'll discuss below that I could perhaps keep the KAT KT2 setup going but like I said I've once again come to the end of the road with it again it seems. The recent event was myself trying out the Roland TD-KVX as it looked good (on paper though) in regards to the 3 zone ride and mechanical hi-hat setup which were two main things that I was looking at. However when trying out the kit I was a bit disappointed with the smaller ride and also smaller bell area on the ride cymbal. When I looked at the kit it looked as though there were 3 crashes and I was wondering 'where's the ride' which was answered when I asked the guy I was speaking to. I was being polite and not rude as it may have come across that way above and in more abrupt electronic format. I played along with a track and again found the bell area to be a bit small especially as I was more used to an acoustic ride with a larger bell area. I also found the cross stick on the snare to be not that pronounced if I was doing it correctly. The pads were better than the ones on my KAT KT2 (rubber) and the hi-hat seemed better and with the physical mechanical pedal. However there were two quite big things in my opinion which the Roland TD-KVX wasn't doing too well which I needed it to (the bell and cross stick stuff) and I thought for the best part of £1500 I thought it should have but I was wrong. I heard Roland kits are solid hardware and should last a long time for both practice and playing at gigs even but I've never owned one so I wouldn't know from direct experience.

I'm sorry about the long post if anyone was bothered enough and had the required amount of patience to read it (I'd understand if anyone didn't) but I thought I'd provide most of the information and background stuff incase anyone had any questions, thoughts or ideas which would be genuinely and greatly appreciated. While trying out the Roland TD-KVX I saw the Roland TD-27KV I think as the larger ride and bell area caught my eye. I asked if the Roland TD-KVX could have a larger ride put on it but apparently not. I could look into that further though just incase. Perhaps the Roland TD-27KV is the way to go? So much more money though but it maybe worth it in the longer term if this Roland stuff is solid hardware? I have known for sometime that Roland is more expensive stuff. Another kit I was looking at was the Carlsbro CSD600 (as 3 zone ride and mechanical hi-hat setup) at about £800 but I couldn't try that kit out at a shop I was checking out and I think you need to and especially after trying out the Roland TD-KVX.

I was just wondering if anyone had any thoughts on what make or even model of kit I should consider to try out if possible in regards to my requirements so far? I feel this is very important for an £800 kit let alone £2650 for the Roland TD-27KV. I know the Roland TD-27KV has only just come out which could further complicate things on top of other stuff. I know there are other makes but is the Roland stuff really solid hardware? Perhaps after a kit like the Roland TD-27KV I may not need another kit for some time. For this type of money and a lot less I've considered an acoustic setup but I don't think it's something I can do and mainly for consideration for my neighbours.

Any advice would be genuinely and greatly appreciated.

P.S. I try to practice five days a week at 1.5 hours a day approximately more recently and before this it was 1.5 hours a day seven days a week. I built up to that but have been playing more seriously since starting Rockschool grades around August 2017. I bought my KAT KT2 kit in 2013 and played a bit also up until August 2017. So I need something that's going to hopefully perform well both for the time I put in (and also including more technically difficult stuff probably if I reach higher grades) but also for Rockschool grade exams that will mean the electric kit is played though an amplifier or similar PA equipment? at the test centre.
 
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electrodrummer

Senior Member
OK - I'll read all that later. In the meantime.....

This question is asked a zillion times, but there's a few simple hurdles

So - can you summarise
1. What's your budget?
2. What have you actually played - as far as pads are concerned - Yamaha silicone, Roland mesh, Alesis mesh, various rubber, etc, and what have you liked or not liked?
3. What's it for? Bedroom? Rehearsing? Pub gigs? Touring?

That's enough to make recommendations.

(skim reading I see Kat = nope, Carlsboro= nope, Roland = maybe, larger pads = not necessary, moving hi-hats = totally unnecessary anachronism)
 
I don't see them listed, but stay away from Alesis. You get alot of drum for your money, but they have serious quality issues.
 

electrodrummer

Senior Member
Keeping it brief.

1. There is no Roland TD-KVX - they're all TD-99xxx ;) where 99 is a number from 1 to 50, designating the module, and xxx is the kit configuration at purchase (i.e. pad options etc)

2. You don't "need" moving hats. They were introduced to keep Luddite acoustic drummers happy. But if you like 'em, then buy all means, etc. (Ihave all sorts in my collection, moving, non-moving, and find the pedal on non-moving is more accurate with a greater degree of movement...)

3. Roland's snares (and other drum pads) are all limited in only having 2-zones. This means on a snare, you can have rimshot or cross-stick but not both. Yamaha, for example, has 3-zone drum pads, so you get rimshot + cross-stick + head.

4. "cross-stick sound could have been more pronounced" - simple - turn it up! You can adjust all the various sounds relative to each other and save.

5. "more acoustic looking snare"? This is an ekit, why make it look like something that it isn't? ;) Fender Strats don't look like acoustic dreadnaughts ;)

6. you don't "need" large pads. 98% of all hits on a drum are within a 4-6" diameter[1]. For the same reason, you don't "need" an 18" ride, for example.

7. Good you have played some options, would see if you can complete the set by hitting some Yamaha silicone (more zones, nice feel and no hotspots)

8. I see no point in breaking the £1500 mark for garage practice use. Indeed, I wouldn't break £1000 and probably not even £750 if going 2nd hand.

9. Look at 2nd user and you'll get a load more for your money. As long as it's a Roland or Yamaha it will be fine.

[1]
drum centre hits.jpg
 

Nick74

Junior Member
2. You don't "need" moving hats. They were introduced to keep Luddite acoustic drummers happy. But if you like 'em, then buy all means, etc. (Ihave all sorts in my collection, moving, non-moving, and find the pedal on non-moving is more accurate with a greater degree of movement...)
I totally agree this. And I'm going even further: A hihat with a motion controller unit on a hihat stand will fail by construction: slightly open (nearly closed) sounds/playing will be muted and disturbed by pedal "chick" sound because of the jolt downwards resulting from a hard stroke though your foot hasn't moved...

And yes, go 2nd hand! I recommend a used (and perhaps outdated) Roland kit for software drumming. For natural drum sound connect with good sounding external drum samplers like SuperiorDrummer or BFD and their great expansions. Roland module because of the shortest midi latency available and software drumming because "acoustic-drum sound" from a module like Roland is gonna suck because sounding like machinegunning plastic shit (though it is advertised with ridiculous terms like "SuperNATURAL technology with Behavior Modeling", "Prismatic Sound Modeling" and "PureAcoustic Ambience Technology").
 

Mr_Runner

Well-known member
OK - I'll read all that later. In the meantime.....

This question is asked a zillion times, but there's a few simple hurdles

So - can you summarise
1. What's your budget?
2. What have you actually played - as far as pads are concerned - Yamaha silicone, Roland mesh, Alesis mesh, various rubber, etc, and what have you liked or not liked?
3. What's it for? Bedroom? Rehearsing? Pub gigs? Touring?

That's enough to make recommendations.

(skim reading I see Kat = nope, Carlsboro= nope, Roland = maybe, larger pads = not necessary, moving hi-hats = totally unnecessary anachronism)
Hi thank you very much for the reply, it's greatly appreciated.

1. My budget is kind of not going too cheap and possibly regretting it later but also not going overkill either which again may cause regret but maybe in different ways. As a figure though the Roland TD-KVX is £1400 approximately and the Roland TD-27KV is £2650. Don't get me wrong £100 is a lot of money to me and I thought for £1400 the Roland TD-KVX would have done it but like I explained above I was wrong. £2650 for me is serious money and I didn't think I'd need to go that far but again maybe I was wrong. However I live quite a simple and minimalistic life and just try to take care of my basic bills, costs and debts generally speaking. I'm not into materialistic possessions (maybe more so when I was a lot younger), expensive holidays, cars, clothing, nights out etc. Again maybe some of these many years ago. Drumming maybe my 'vice' as it were. I don't have kids or a girlfriend to support.

2. I've only played my KAT KT2 (rubber pads) and tried out the Roland TD-KVX with mesh heads. My KAT KT2 has been ok as my first kit generally speaking and there's not been anything I've disliked about it apart from the stuff that I discussed above. I liked the Roland TD-KVX moving hi-hats and stand (my KAT KT2 is the cheaper loose pedal and wire hi-hat setup and a single hi-hat plate) and also the mesh heads seemed better than rubber ones. Like I was saying above I disliked the ride cymbal on the Roland TD-KVX and I thought the cross stick sound from the snare could have been more pronounced. The Roland TD-27KV had what looked to be a bigger and better ride with a larger bell area which is more like what I've been used to using (an acoustic one which I discussed above) and the cross stick sound maybe better as it has a more acoustic looking snare? Larger pads can be ok perhaps if you need to hit them while not necessarily looking at them while doing something else and / or reading music as a larger pad would probably increase your chance of hitting it and not the rim.

3. The kit would be used for Rockschool grade practice (I'm on grade 4) in a prefab garage I did up and a reasonably good job was done here. I try to practice five days a week at 1.5 hours a day approximately more recently and before this it was 1.5 hours a day seven days a week. Perhaps more importantly though the kit will be played I think in front of a Rockschool examiner at the test centre and most likely through an amplifier or similar PA equipment? Therefore I think I need solid hardware that won't hopefully let me down, my playing will be attempting to do that. It would also need to perhaps relatively easily handle the time that I'd be most likely putting into it and also the grades if I carry on and reach them will be more technically difficult so a better kit may hopefully handle some stuff that may get thrown at it in the future which is more difficult to see and anticipate than the present.
 

Mr_Runner

Well-known member
Keeping it brief.

1. There is no Roland TD-KVX - they're all TD-99xxx ;) where 99 is a number from 1 to 50, designating the module, and xxx is the kit configuration at purchase (i.e. pad options etc)

2. You don't "need" moving hats. They were introduced to keep Luddite acoustic drummers happy. But if you like 'em, then buy all means, etc. (Ihave all sorts in my collection, moving, non-moving, and find the pedal on non-moving is more accurate with a greater degree of movement...)

3. Roland's snares (and other drum pads) are all limited in only having 2-zones. This means on a snare, you can have rimshot or cross-stick but not both. Yamaha, for example, has 3-zone drum pads, so you get rimshot + cross-stick + head.

4. "cross-stick sound could have been more pronounced" - simple - turn it up! You can adjust all the various sounds relative to each other and save.

5. "more acoustic looking snare"? This is an ekit, why make it look like something that it isn't? ;) Fender Strats don't look like acoustic dreadnaughts ;)

6. you don't "need" large pads. 98% of all hits on a drum are within a 4-6" diameter[1]. For the same reason, you don't "need" an 18" ride, for example.

7. Good you have played some options, would see if you can complete the set by hitting some Yamaha silicone (more zones, nice feel and no hotspots)

8. I see no point in breaking the £1500 mark for garage practice use. Indeed, I wouldn't break £1000 and probably not even £750 if going 2nd hand.

9. Look at 2nd user and you'll get a load more for your money. As long as it's a Roland or Yamaha it will be fine.

[1]
View attachment 89682
1. That was interesting and thank you.

2. I think I like moving better as I think it could be perhaps easier to transfer your practice to an acoustic kit. I've managed with a non moving generally speaking up to now but if I carry on with grades it is most likely going to get harder and what hi-hat work could be involved I simply don't know. I think I like hi-hat stuff as well. Of course personal preference probably comes into this like with a lot of other things. I don't know maybe a non moving on a Roland kit maybe a lot better than mine but still.

3. Thanks for the info on the Roland snares. Does the 2 zone mean you can switch between rimshot and cross stick use or that you only get one or the other? Perhaps I could check out some Yamaha kits for my requirements.

4. Ok cool.

5. I see what you mean here and I was thinking that it's all this serious money to make an electric kit look like an acoustic kit so I thought 'why not just get an acoustic' but as I was saying before I can't really do that. I guess that's where the companies may have an angle with people who can't have an acoustic because of the increase in noise but want one that looks like an acoustic. I guess the increased functionality could come into it as well. I started using acoustic cymbals with my electric as I was restricted zone wise because of my cheaper and older setup and was a much cheaper idea and solution but only potentially in some ways as there are some things I haven't quite got to the bottom of yet (the headphone stuff I was talking about in my original post).

6. I liked the 18 inch ride as it had a larger bell area on it and seemed more like the acoustic ride that I've been used to. Perhaps a better drummer could be more accurate on a smaller bell area?

7. I could check out some Yamaha kits and maybe even try some out but like I was saying in my original post finding them on display so you can try them out can be difficult. I discussed this stuff.

8. That sounds sensible. I don't know though I'm at a point where I'm thinking 'sod it if I like the look and feel of a kit and it can hopefully do what I need it to then bugger it'. I guess you only live once and for how much longer is an unknown. I may also never need to buy another kit if I get the best one I can within reason. Don't get me wrong this attitude isn't an excuse to be over reckless all of the time. I don't suppose you know of any drum places that may have some Yamaha kits on display that you can try out with people who are ok?

9. In terms of second hand I don't think I'd go there. You maybe right concerning Roland or Yamaha but they'd be little if any warranty if there was possibly even a small chance of something that had gone wrong. I just don't think it's a good idea with electrical goods and you could end up paying more or even a lot more at a later date. I just haven't the personal and direct experience with second hand Roland or Yamaha although I appreciate you have it is not my own personal and direct experience which in the end counts for everything even if what someone has been telling you turns out to be the case. Hopefully this means either Roland or Yamaha is the way to go. Just need the right models / setup which I could check out.

Anyway thank you very much again, you've been very helpful and I really appreciate it.
 
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Old Dog new Cans

Senior Member
Look, I know nothing about these drums, but they are compact and priced nicely. I own a ddrum acoustic 5-piece, which I really like a lot. It's made well, sounds great.


And, it basically has everything you need, I think. . .something else to look at.
 

Mr_Runner

Well-known member
I totally agree this. And I'm going even further: A hihat with a motion controller unit on a hihat stand will fail by construction: slightly open (nearly closed) sounds/playing will be muted and disturbed by pedal "chick" sound because of the jolt downwards resulting from a hard stroke though your foot hasn't moved...

And yes, go 2nd hand! I recommend a used (and perhaps outdated) Roland kit for software drumming. For natural drum sound connect with good sounding external drum samplers like SuperiorDrummer or BFD and their great expansions. Roland module because of the shortest midi latency available and software drumming because "acoustic-drum sound" from a module like Roland is gonna suck because sounding like machinegunning plastic shit (though it is advertised with ridiculous terms like "SuperNATURAL technology with Behavior Modeling", "Prismatic Sound Modeling" and "PureAcoustic Ambience Technology").
Thank you for that and your reply, interesting. Maybe a non moving on a Roland / Yamaha kit maybe a lot better than mine.

In terms of second hand I don't think I'd go there. You maybe right concerning Roland or Yamaha but they'd be little if any warranty if there was possibly even a small chance of something that had gone wrong. I just don't think it's a good idea with electrical goods and you could end up paying more or even a lot more at a later date. I just haven't the personal and direct experience with second hand Roland or Yamaha although I appreciate you have it is not my own personal and direct experience which in the end counts for everything even if what someone has been telling you turns out to be the case. Hopefully this means either Roland or Yamaha is the way to go. Just need the right models / setup which I could check out.
 
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Mr_Runner

Well-known member
Look, I know nothing about these drums, but they are compact and priced nicely. I own a ddrum acoustic 5-piece, which I really like a lot. It's made well, sounds great.


And, it basically has everything you need, I think. . .something else to look at.
Ah I see. I can see you have done your research and it's within your area of expertise. My sincere condolences.
 

Mr_Runner

Well-known member
Look, I know nothing about these drums, but they are compact and priced nicely. I own a ddrum acoustic 5-piece, which I really like a lot. It's made well, sounds great.


And, it basically has everything you need, I think. . .something else to look at.
I'm sorry about my first reply if you were trying to help. I thought you may have been taking the mick.
 

Old Dog new Cans

Senior Member
Well I was, being honest. I don't know a heck of a lot about electronic drums. I was simply adding a choice that most people don't seem to know much about.

I'm not sure what taking the mick means exactly, but I'm pretty sure that was NOT my intention! (y):cool:

ddrum has had a few electronic offerings in the last 5 years. I've been watching some vids recently and simply thought to add their name.
 

Mr_Runner

Well-known member
Well I was, being honest. I don't know a heck of a lot about electronic drums. I was simply adding a choice that most people don't seem to know much about.

I'm not sure what taking the mick means exactly, but I'm pretty sure that was NOT my intention! (y):cool:

ddrum has had a few electronic offerings in the last 5 years. I've been watching some vids recently and simply thought to add their name.
Hi again ok I really appreciate your help and time so thank you very much. I had a small feeling you may not know what 'taking the mick' / 'taking the piss' means especially if you're not from the Uk which many people on forums aren't. It basically means making fun of someone / something essentially but again I apologise for that as it wasn't your intention. With someone like me though I can expect it and especially on the Internet as well at times.

I think either Roland or Yamaha is the way to go. Just need the right models / setup which I could check out. Your option was a bit cheaper though. I don't know much about electric drums either! - but I know more now than I did and I fully appreciate everyone who has advised me here. I could check out ddrum a bit.
 

electrodrummer

Senior Member
Re: 2nd user stuff comment I made:

I just bought another 20+ year-old Yamaha DTX on Friday to add to my collection of stuff. Totally works with zero problems,

(I have gear from all manufacturers - and it's all gigged).
 

Mr_Runner

Well-known member
Re: 2nd user stuff comment I made:

I just bought another 20+ year-old Yamaha DTX on Friday to add to my collection of stuff. Totally works with zero problems,

(I have gear from all manufacturers - and it's all gigged).
Ok cool I think from this either Roland or Yamaha is the way to go and in terms of more solid hardware that should last. Just need the right models / setup which I could check out. Saying that what other manufacturer stuff has been solid, gigged etc?
 

electrodrummer

Senior Member
Ok cool I think from this either Roland or Yamaha is the way to go and in terms of more solid hardware that should last. Just need the right models / setup which I could check out. Saying that what other manufacturer stuff has been solid, gigged etc?
Been gigging full ekits live since 1986. Been gigging (urgh) "hybrid" since 1981. Things that have died:
Alesis pads and SD card reader
Alternate Mode pads (Trapkat) and screen, hat controller
Pintech pads
Roland - generally OK - iffy hat controller, dodgy pads in Handsonic
Yamaha - nothing
 

Mr_Runner

Well-known member
Been gigging full ekits live since 1986. Been gigging (urgh) "hybrid" since 1981. Things that have died:
Alesis pads and SD card reader
Alternate Mode pads (Trapkat) and screen, hat controller
Pintech pads
Roland - generally OK - iffy hat controller, dodgy pads in Handsonic
Yamaha - nothing
Ok cool I think either Roland or Yamaha. Just need to get some more info on models and a place where I can try a Yamaha if all else goes ok. Shit what stuff was around in 1981 / 1986? I thought electric kits at least mainstream were more recent? 2005 maybe guessing? I'm not sure if you're in the USA or elsewhere where the situation may have been different?
 

electrodrummer

Senior Member
I thought electric kits at least mainstream were more recent? 2005 maybe guessing?
You heard of Simmons? EVERY band from 1981 onwards had a Simmons SDSV [1]. All of them! It was the basis for all popular music for years, until the retro kick-back in 60s-Kinks/Beatles/etc influenced Britpop in the UK (and grunge in the US) early-mid 90s - where the acoustic drummers all got their 60s-style 1-up, 1-down, 4-piece kits, that we're generally stuck with seeing today (or drummers "hiding" their edrum kits in 60s-style acoustic drum shells).

How young are you? ;)

See those pads in my avatar? From 1986.

[1] You basically weren't allowed on Top of the Pops without a Simmons kit,

1579567357780.png
 
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Mr_Runner

Well-known member
You heard of Simmons? EVERY band from 1981 onwards had a Simmons SDSV [1]. All of them! It was the basis for all popular music for years, until the retro kick-back in 60s-Kinks/Beatles/etc influenced Britpop in the UK (and grunge in the US) early-mid 90s - where the acoustic drummers all got their 60s-style 1-up, 1-down, 4-piece kits, that we're generally stuck with seeing today (or drummers "hiding" their edrum kits in 60s-style acoustic drum shells).

How young are you? ;)

See those pads in my avatar? From 1986.

[1] You basically weren't allowed on Top of the Pops without a Simmons kit,

View attachment 89684
I think I've heard the name Simmons but that's about it. When I read your post and the years involved I suspected you may have been at least partly talking about synthesizers as a lot of groups in the 80s were using them as you know. However this period was a little before my time.

In terms of the equipment that has gone down on you it actually looks like you've done ok and had at least some luck on your side considering the length of your experience. Some of that was some cheaper stuff I think? and maybe you stuck generally speaking to using more solid equipment if that exists (I wouldn't know at present from direct experience). Also if you have some cheaper stuff as well and it's still going it may not have been used as much as some other stuff as I think you have quite a lot of gear? Perhaps also you did what you could to look after your equipment and keep it tip top.

Ah just seen the 1986 pads! Were they some of the first? They must have been.
 

Mr_Runner

Well-known member
Roland kvx
March 3, 2019

Music Background: Drummer for 30 years
Purchase date: july 2nd 2018
Review date : March 3rd 2019

Pros: the drum heads are very durable. The module has bluetooth, it has a 12" snare, the module has a lot of different options for different sounds


Cons: to start, there is no customer support for this product. Just your salesman/woman trying to fubble thur the same manual that comes with the kit.

Roland wasn't any better, there fix for ever problem is to reset the module back to factory settings and start over.

I hate the high hat, it has two sensors. One on the edge and the other on the top flat portion. If you activate both sensors while playing you get this terrible distortion. I've went into my settings and try to make adjustments to get rid of this with no luck.

The ride cymbal bell has a precise spot that you have to hit to get the correct sound, if you off a little you just get a thud.

Also, I don't like the kick drum. It wants to sway back an forth. Another problem the drum rack needs to be wider, one of the support legs is right where my kick drum needs to be, so I have to move it to one side or the other and it makes it awkward to use.

Kinda pricey for a lot of plastic. It's fun as a novelty to play on in a music store but I would probly never buy another set again.

Just my opinion
With the Roland snare does the 2 zone mean you can switch between rimshot and cross stick use or that you only get one or the other? Perhaps I could check out some Yamaha kits for my requirements.

The Roland customer support should be good, preferably very good and especially for equipment of this kind of money.

I wasn't keen on the ride either mainly to do with the size of the bell area. It was too small in terms of what I've been used to on an acoustic ride that I've used with my electric kit. I think for £1400 on a KVX they should have been decent enough to put a ride on it with at least a larger bell area and this isn't strictly a first kind of beginner kit. I was wrong, again.

With the kick drum I think I noticed that as well. At first I thought it was the pedal and then the guy said 'it's not the pedal it's the pad on the floor that maybe a bit uneven' and I think that was right as the pedal seemed attached to the kick drum sufficiently. I just hope he wasn't being economical with the truth (or being essentially untruthful) with the 'uneven floor'. Again I'm probably wrong.

It was pricey. Sometimes I think you need to put your hand in your pocket if you can afford it for better and more robust hard wearing stuff because if you don't you may find more problems and probably ultimately more costs down the line so it may have paid in the short term but not in the long. I was disappointed that Roland didn't put a decent ride on the KVX for £1400. Perhaps it's part of the strategy to try to get you to buy the TD-27KV with the better ride at £2650.

What do you think of Yamaha? I'm after one that has a 3 zone ride with at least a bigger bell area than the one on the KVX.
 
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