Where do I start?

ibariabl

New member
What’s your opinion, can I learn to play drums well at the age of 33? At some point, I realized that I was not doing what I wanted. Since childhood, I dreamed of making music, I beat rhythms around, on the street, in the office, with my hands and my legs... Where should I start?


I have taken such a payday loan and yes, I just had to pay what I borrowed from that company (was $200) plus $50 (or $25 for every $100). But make sure you do not get caught up in taking out one loan after another to repay the precedent debt. Have been in that swamp for several years before. (coming webpage) Online payday loans Wisconsin laws do not prohibit rollovers, so it is fairly easy to get entrenched in debts.
 
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MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Drums are not sports, you can learn them at any age. If you really want to learn, make a small investment on some quality used gear, and get a teacher. The teacher can discuss goals, techniques, basically any questions and concerns you might have about drumming. They can analyze your playing and help you to fix any problem areas you might have. A teacher will also help you progress faster than you would if you just figured it out on your own.

Drums are fantastic. Even if just a hobby, it's an excellent way to spend time and is good for you too.

If you need help with gear, link ads from your local Craigslist and we can help you sort through them.
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
I relearned at about 55 so 33 makes you a young man. Forget that number and focus. In 3 years you'll laugh at this post.
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
You started at DW so you started at the right place. Welcome we are all along same path just different places along adventure and journey. I think it has mental and physical therapeutic value to, and a great hobby.
 

KamaK

Platinum Member
What’s your opinion, can I learn to play drums well at the age of 33? At some point, I realized that I was not doing what I wanted. Since childhood, I dreamed of making music, I beat rhythms around, on the street, in the office, with my hands and my legs... Where should I start?
I began at age ~40. How to start:

Logistics: (Can you even do this?)
Where are you going to store a drum kit?
Where are you going to practice? (noise restrictions)
When are you going to practice? (noise restrictions)
Do you have ~$1000?
Do you have a few hours a week to spare for playing?


Research:
Is there a live (flesh and blood) teacher in your area?
Is there an online teacher that you don't hate? (Drumeo)
What should you buy? (Example: Stage Customs, Zildjian A's, Yamaha 7 series hardware . or... ekit like Yamaha DTX 700).
Is the teacher available for at-home (or rehearsal area) lessons?

Buy:
Order your stuff.
Schedule a lesson for the (day after the) delivery date for setup assistance and introduction.

Practice:
See your teacher regularly. Whether it be once a week, or once every two months.
Spend ample time practicing your academic/online courseware
Spend ample time on your own musical ambitions
Find another musician(s) to play with regularly.

Finally:
Enjoy yourself.
Entertain others.
 

gdmoore28

Gold Member
Can you start learning the drums at 33? Of course!

KamaK gave you some very good advice. I'll sum up my suggestions briefly:

* Go ahead a buy a first kit. You didn't say how much you have to spend, but you can certainly find a very good drum set, hardware and cymbals with something like the following:
- PDP or Pacific drums are some of the best buys going, among others. Buy them used (buy everything used!). Look for a set of Pacific CX or LX series. You can often find them in excellent condition, often with hardware, for around $300-400. (Try to find the ones made in Mexico.) There are also great bargains to be found on the popular Pearl Export drums and hardware in the same price range.
- Buy some used Zildjian cymbals. Best bet for excellent prices are a 20" Zildjian "A" ride cymbal for as little as $100; a set of Zildjian 14" "A" hihat cymbals for $100-125; that will do it unless you want to add a crash cymbal: Zildjian 16" or 18" "A" thin crash, $80-90. These are professional cymbals that will last a lifetime, and will resell for what you paid for them. You can skimp a bit on drums, but NOT ON CYMBALS! Buy the pro gear first and last.

So for around $700 you have a kit and cymbals that you will not outgrow, and can easily be used in a professional setting.

* As soon as you have a drum set, ask around and find the best drum instructor near you. From him you need to learn the basics (setup, proper grip, etc.) and - most importantly - how to read drum music. This is not hard to do with a little practice, but learning to read drum music will open up the entire world of learning drums in the fastest way possible.

* Once you learn to read drum music, you can move on to online instructors. Keep your local instructor as long as you continue to advance, but the wealth of instruction available cannot be over-estimated.

* PRACTICE! This is where the rubber hits the road. Learning will feel awkward and often frustrating. Never forget that this is common to everybody. Just keep PRACTICING! Did I say to PRACTICE? Yes, I did. And it cannot be stressed enough. The ONLY way to improve is to practice, practice, practice.

* And I love KamaK's suggestion to find somebody to play with. There is nothing that can set a fire inside you like actually making music with other people. Try to make friends with a guitarist, keyboardist, and/or a bass player that are better than you are but are willing to sit around and simply play. Without doubt, playing with other people is the ultimate human interaction.

GeeDeeEmm
 
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