Where did my genre go?

someguy01

Well-known member
This would be me. ;)
50 years old, have more heavy metal shirts and skull rings than should be allowed & have SiriusXM's Hair Nation locked in 24/7.

I've tried newer stuff & like it for the most part. But then that fades off & I'm back to what I know & love. I make no excuses for it & ignore those saying I'm "stuck in the 80's".
Fook 'em!
Saw a kid in the Walmart parking lot the other day ( he might have been 20) and I joked to my wife about his attire saying "I'm pretty sure I saw him and that outfit at Judas Priest in '90.
It's coming back around, like all "fashion" does.
Your shirts will be retro-vintage and worth 5 times what you paid for them.
 

Ransan

Senior Member
This would be me 50 years old, have more heavy metal shirts and skull rings than should be allowed & have SiriusXM's Hair Nation locked in 24/7.

I've tried newer stuff & like it for the most part. But then that fades off & I'm back to what I know & love. I make no excuses for it & ignore those saying I'm "stuck in the 80's".
Fook 'em!
Yep lol.

I get texts that still spell out ‘fuken’ occasionally; and, they still flip the bird when pics are taken, hair and beards all greyed out and what not.
It doesn’t matter if with their parents, kids, grandparents in frame, or even their taking the photo.
 

doggyd69b

Well-known member
I understand why people did not accept Nirvana or Pearl Jam or bands from that time as legitimate. Back in the 80's when hair metal bands were at the top and the term Rock Star was actually used for someone in a rock band, the idea was that the more complex parts you were able to play as a musician well, it made you a better musician, so then came the Yngwie Malmsteens and Tony Mcalpines and every other band wanting to outdo each other.... then comes Nirvana........ The total opposite of that with their sappy and stupidly simple melodies and general apathy towards life...
I can see how people who had spent years honing their instrument and now were being replaced by a less than mediocre musician took issue with that..
I was never a Nirvana or Pearl Jam fan and I think they are highly overrated but a lot of people like them so.....
(Tom Araya [Slayer] once said "Thousands of people cannot be wrong")... Well they sure as hell can otherwise Justin Bieber and Taylor Swift would not be famous....
 

Vapor Trail

Junior Member
Not only does genre popularity change with time, but can also happen overnight with simple switch of geography.

From 2009-2016 I was in an original progressive rock band based in Philly region. We played many covers, but found plenty of gigs where we could feature original material, with fairly enthusiastic crowds. We played at a prog festival one year in Gettysburg and gigged at the "NJ Proghouse". Prog bands from likes of Yes, Dream Theater, King Crimson to Flower Kings, Steven Wilson (and Porcupine Tree), Transatlantic, The Aristocrats (well, proggy instrumental jazz), etc would stop at venues in Philly region when on tour. Prog rock is alive and well out there!

Moved to Northern California in 2016 and I've yet to find a similar musical outlet. Maybe it's there, but as far as I've seen, prog gets little love in Sacramento region. It's been a bummer!

I guess a more predictable comparison would be a country rock drummer moving from Nashville to, I dunno, LA in mid 80s during the glam rock era?
 

someguy01

Well-known member
I understand why people did not accept Nirvana or Pearl Jam or bands from that time as legitimate. Back in the 80's when hair metal bands were at the top and the term Rock Star was actually used for someone in a rock band, the idea was that the more complex parts you were able to play as a musician well, it made you a better musician, so then came the Yngwie Malmsteens and Tony Mcalpines and every other band wanting to outdo each other.... then comes Nirvana........ The total opposite of that with their sappy and stupidly simple melodies and general apathy towards life...
I can see how people who had spent years honing their instrument and now were being replaced by a less than mediocre musician took issue with that..
I was never a Nirvana or Pearl Jam fan and I think they are highly overrated but a lot of people like them so.....
(Tom Araya [Slayer] once said "Thousands of people cannot be wrong")... Well they sure as hell can otherwise Justin Bieber and Taylor Swift would not be famous....
There is no accounting for taste.
Our parents said the same things about what we listened to, as did their parents.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Saw a kid in the Walmart parking lot the other day ( he might have been 20) and I joked to my wife about his attire saying "I'm pretty sure I saw him and that outfit at Judas Priest in '90.
It's coming back around, like all "fashion" does.
Your shirts will be retro-vintage and worth 5 times what you paid for them.
Here's what I dont get. I have been wearing camos and skull t-shirts since the 80s. It was never a thing. Now it is a thing, and every Tom, Dick, and Harry wants to look like a metalhead. When did my lack of fashion become fashionable, and why is it sticking around?

Case and point:
DFBDQMxXoAAfaR2-2.jpg
Like Kim Kardashian listens to Morbid Angel.
 

wraub

Well-known member
As someone who use to play in original progressive bands, I completely relate to this.
It's definitely not a genre around here anymore...



Not only does genre popularity change with time, but can also happen overnight with simple switch of geography.

From 2009-2016 I was in an original progressive rock band based in Philly region. We played many covers, but found plenty of gigs where we could feature original material, with fairly enthusiastic crowds. We played at a prog festival one year in Gettysburg and gigged at the "NJ Proghouse". Prog bands from likes of Yes, Dream Theater, King Crimson to Flower Kings, Steven Wilson (and Porcupine Tree), Transatlantic, The Aristocrats (well, proggy instrumental jazz), etc would stop at venues in Philly region when on tour. Prog rock is alive and well out there!

Moved to Northern California in 2016 and I've yet to find a similar musical outlet. Maybe it's there, but as far as I've seen, prog gets little love in Sacramento region. It's been a bummer!

I guess a more predictable comparison would be a country rock drummer moving from Nashville to, I dunno, LA in mid 80s during the glam rock era?
 

wraub

Well-known member
I dunno man, God Of Emptiness seems right up her alley...


Here's what I dont get. I have been wearing camos and skull t-shirts since the 80s. It was never a thing. Now it is a thing, and every Tom, Dick, and Harry wants to look like a metalhead. When did my lack of fashion become fashionable, and why is it sticking around?

Case and point:
View attachment 103846
Like Kim Kardashian listens to Morbid Angel.
 

doggyd69b

Well-known member
There is no accounting for taste.
Our parents said the same things about what we listened to, as did their parents.
but my mom (who grew up listening to Elvis and the like) could not deny that some of the 80 rockers were excellent musicians. The same cannot be said about current "artists" You can't name a single act today that you can say he or she is an excellent musician (and no, selling a lot of albums doesn't make you a good musician FFS Kanye West has sold millions and I don't think he even knows what tempo means....Katie Perry and she doesn't know how to play any instruments) when I say musician I refer to someone that actually plays an instrument and is proficient at it and computer software and MPC don't count. (my dead grandma can make a beat with an mpc and call it music)....
 

CommanderRoss

Silver Member
Here's what I don't get: I have been wearing camos and skull t-shirts since the 80s. It was never a thing. Now it is a thing, and every Tom, Dick, and Harry wants to look like a metalhead.
Until you play the music of the clothes they're wearing.
Then it's like that meme of "I listen to all types of music" until her boyfriend plays Slayer at full blast. :LOL:

When my metal shirts became "fashion" I got concerned.
Then again...it's keeping those bands on the radar. Nothing like seeing Brett Michaels or Mark Slaughter back up on stage doing their thing.
 

Al Strange

Well-known member
I understand why people did not accept Nirvana or Pearl Jam or bands from that time as legitimate. Back in the 80's when hair metal bands were at the top and the term Rock Star was actually used for someone in a rock band, the idea was that the more complex parts you were able to play as a musician well, it made you a better musician, so then came the Yngwie Malmsteens and Tony Mcalpines and every other band wanting to outdo each other.... then comes Nirvana........ The total opposite of that with their sappy and stupidly simple melodies and general apathy towards life...
I can see how people who had spent years honing their instrument and now were being replaced by a less than mediocre musician took issue with that..
I was never a Nirvana or Pearl Jam fan and I think they are highly overrated but a lot of people like them so.....
(Tom Araya [Slayer] once said "Thousands of people cannot be wrong")... Well they sure as hell can otherwise Justin Bieber and Taylor Swift would not be famous....
I was that guy I’m afraid; I looked down my nose at the simplicity of it all...what I failed to appreciate was the beautiful honesty inherent in a lot of that music. Whilst I’d sooner listen to Whitesnake 87 than Nevermind, I concede that Nevermind was a brilliant album. The fact there were two outstanding talents in that band, Cobain and Grohl, can’t really be denied whether you like the music or not... :unsure: (y)
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Until you play the music of the clothes they're wearing.
Then it's like that meme of "I listen to all types of music" until her boyfriend plays Slayer at full blast. :LOL:

When my metal shirts became "fashion" I got concerned.
Then again...it's keeping those bands on the radar. Nothing like seeing Brett Michaels or Mark Slaughter back up on stage doing their thing.
I dunno, I'm torn. On one hand I'm like "cool, another metal shirt". On the other hand I'm like "you dont listen to metal you poser".

It's not just metal. Lots of music has a dress code or uniform. I have questions now. Time to start a new thread.
 

Stroman

Platinum Member
I can't say I've experienced the complete erasure of a genre. Music evolves, but its roots never die. For instance, much of what passes as "country" today is a far cry from the vintage sounds of Hank Williams, Marty Robbins, and Roy Rogers, but elements of their influence are alive and well in recent releases. Fortunately, the ghosts of country legends live on.
Genres certainly do morph. My Mrs. was listening to a newish country song the other day, perhaps a Dierks Bentley song. I said, just listen to the music for a second, and imagine Jon Bon Jovi singing over it! I'll be damned if it didn't sound just like a Bon Jovi song with a twang and a steel guitar.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Also, the 1980's show called Wonder Years was set during the 1960's. If the Wonder Years came out now, it would be set in the early 2000's.
Rank and file so far:
The Wonder Years
That 70s show
The Goldbergs

There will be a 90s show next.
 
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