Where are you technically supposed to sit on your throne?

organworthyplayer337

Well-known member
Do you sit with your buttocks basically flush with the back curvature of your throne?

or are you a little closer to the edge?

just something I thought about recently.
 

J-W

Well-known member
I have a tractor seat style throne (Roc-n-soc) and I sit pretty much in the middle, where I find my center of balance. If I sit too far forward, then my footwork suffers dramatically because I play heel-up double bass.
 
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cbphoto

Gold Member
I sit with my butt on top of the seat. 😂

Actually, I had a Gibraltar wide-butt model with a large saddle-style cushion and planted my butt firmly in the middle. When I switched to a Tama hydraulic “Ergo Rider” it felt very different at first ‘cuz it’s a smaller seat area. My pelvic/butt bones are centered on central part of the cushion and the backrest is firmly planted in my lumbar region. It’s a very secure seating and one that I don’t notice after 2 or 52 minutes of playing.

I also have learned to sit erect and not slouch and the backrest helps me achieve that. When my posture is good, my butt is squarely over the center of the seat.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
I have a circle throne and sit in the center. I feel posture is more important though. Gotta constantly tell myself to make sure I'm sitting up straight.
 

rhumbagirl

Senior Member
For me, I see my throne as nothing more than a anchor point to keep weight off my legs, but I'm on the edge, leaning into the drums. It may have something to do with traditional grip style, playing conventional - left hand on snare, right hand on hihat - on a conventionally oriented drum set. Since one's upper body turns into the hihat, thus putting the CG point more forward.

(DW needs a glossary thread as a sticky for reference, with a place to add new terms like conventional orientation, conventional playing style)

This also begs the question, do thrones with back rests generally find homes under matched grip players, since trad players would find the back rest in the way of their elbows? Food for thought.
 

sumdrumguy

Senior Member
I have tried tractor style seats, but prefer a simple round design.

I sit top and center, with a tall spine. Head up. Eyes, and ears, open. :)
 

No Way Jose

Silver Member
The thought never entered my mind.
 

cbphoto

Gold Member
This also begs the question, do thrones with back rests generally find homes under matched grip players, since trad players would find the back rest in the way of their elbows?
The Tama backrest is more of a padded lumbar support bar. It's not large, maybe 10" wide, and doesn't seem like it would affect a traditional grip playing. I can't say this about other makes/models.

feat_1st_Chair_Backrest.jpg
 

Bozozoid

Well-known member
I sit near the edge. I have the roc-n-soc round seat with the doughnut type center and hate the part of my rear that sort of falls into that section. Hate it.
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
Honestly, I haven't given this question much thought. I immediately, without awareness, land in my most comfortable spot upon mounting my throne. The same goes for picking up sticks. My hands go to the "proper" position instantaneously. I don't think about it anymore than I think about breathing. But now that the topic is in my head, I'll conduct a brief investigation. Back in a moment . . .

I'm closer to the center of the throne than to its edge. My throne doesn't have backrests or other supports. I rely upon a strong core to sustain posture. I've never confronted any throne-related orthopedic problems, so I guess I'm doing something right -- right in terms of my own physiology, that is.
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
I sit slightly back of center, on a regular round throne. I play heel up on both sides, and I don’t bury the beater, so my core muscles and balance are really important to keep me centered.
 

dboomer

Senior Member
Well best for the throne would be with your center of gravity directly above the center post. But where you sit depends on whether you play heal up or down. Heal up players generally benefit from a little higher setting and not leaning forward. Heal down can sit a bit lower and since you are not raising your legs (much) leaning on them (while potentially bad for your back) isn’t going to be counter productive.
 

TK-421

Senior Member
This also begs the question, do thrones with back rests generally find homes under matched grip players, since trad players would find the back rest in the way of their elbows? Food for thought.
I‘m not following this logic. Whether I’m playing matched or traditional, both of my elbows are always at my side, never sticking behind my torso. In fact, I just hopped on my kit to test that out, and even playing traditional with both hands on the hi hat, my left elbow was right at my side, not sticking behind my torso at all. Actually it was in almost the exact same position as when I switched to matched grip.

How are you sitting so that (presumably) your left elbow would hit a backrest? I could play traditional grip in a BarcaLounger and not have issues.
 

Stroman

Platinum Member
I could play traditional grip in a BarcaLounger and not have issues.
This made me laugh! I actually *DO* play trade grip in a BarcaLounger sometimes - on my practice pad, lol.

As for the throne question, I think it's too individual to make a rule. Physiology, throne type, playing style, technique - all of those elements have a very complex interplay and directly affect how we approach the instrument.
 

TMe

Senior Member
Depends. I can sit low, and my legs hurt, or I can sit high, and my back hurts. I try to find a spot in the middle but, apparently, there isn't one.
 

rhumbagirl

Senior Member
How are you sitting so that (presumably) your left elbow would hit a backrest?
Ah, I was assuming the throne seat with the back rest was the stationary kind rather than the swivel kind. Are they all swivel type?

And yes, if you play traditional grip on a conventionally oriented drum set, you will twist your torso in the direction of the hihat when playing the hihat, especially playing two hands on the hihat. Unfortunately my comments are being made when an actual drum set is not in front of me. I could be getting my thoughts confused with the occasional rehearsal using a bar stool with a back rest.
 
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