When you're the most experienced in the room

bearblastbeats

Senior Member
Been going through the trials and tribulations of finding a new set of players to no avail.

I sat in with a set last night, decent set of guys, but just... not to romance previous players, couldn't cut the cloth.

Now, it wasnt all bad, we played for 3 or so hours, but it felt like, well no, it was me leading the pack. Tbey relied on my to tell them what to play.

They offered me the gig and its mine to lose. The guys are decent players, easy to get along with and essentially having fun and playing out trumps even playing with better musicians who don't leave their garage.

If I were to continue to play with them, I'd have to get them to play at my place. No offense to the guys place but it was over loaded with useless gear and smelled bad. I left their last night itching as if it was overrun with fleas. Really turned off by that but its slim pickings here for ccompetent players my neck of the woods.
 

Jml

Senior Member
Yikes. I hope it pans out. I prefer playing out to just rehearsing all the time, too.
 

ColdFusion

Active Member
playing out trumps even playing with better musicians who don't leave their garage
I think what happens to lot of shed cats is as we improve and get comfortable with our practice grind, we start to notice how terrible and time consuming it can be to jam with strangers, lol.
No offense to the guys place but it was over loaded with useless gear and smelled bad. I left their last night itching as if it was overrun with fleas. Really turned off by that...
Yo, case in point. Homie you are a pro, that's why you can't ignore the fact that their music spot is disorganized and...stinky!?
Those are outward signs of internal/systemic problems.
..but its slim pickings here for ccompetent players my neck of the woods
This is a trade-off that each has to calculate for themselves. If it's purely for the joy of just being on stage, then it might be worth it. I understand that there are a lot of 'averagely good' players in the scene who would rather quit playing music than sit at home practicing all day trying to get "perfect". This just comes down to personality and personal goals.

I used to get on the local CL and hit up everyone who I thought even might be compatible.
After a few jam sessions I realized that I can't be in a stinky disorganized band. Spoiled, yes probably. But the evolution of it is that I'm no longer seeing the local "scene" as the final goal, or any goal. As I've realized that I must build my own project with a few of the rarer cats like me. Hungry, gifted, fastidious chaps who have sharp ears and really play to play.
This means being patient and sticking to my grind. I feel like anything other than that would be a "larp". Even if it paid well. At least for me.

In your case definitely insist on bringing the jams to your place. The drummer should schlep the least when possible. Especially if they are the band leader.
 
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bearblastbeats

Senior Member
I think what happens to lot of shed cats is as we improve and get comfortable with our practice grind, we start to notice how terrible and time consuming it can be to jam with strangers, lol.

Yo, case in point. Homie you are a pro, that's why you can't ignore the fact that their music spot is disorganized and...stinky!?
Those are outward signs of internal/systemic problems.

This is a trade-off that each has to calculate for themselves. If it's purely for the joy of just being on stage, then it might be worth it. I understand that there are a lot of 'averagely good' players in the scene who would rather quit playing music than sit at home practicing all day trying to get "perfect". This just comes down to personality and personal goals.

I used to get on the local CL and hit up everyone who I thought even might be compatible.
After a few jam sessions I realized that I can't be in a stinky disorganized band. Spoiled, yes probably. But the evolution of it is that I'm no longer seeing the local "scene" as the final goal, or any goal. As I've realized that I must build my own project with a few of the rarer cats like me. Hungry, gifted, fastidious chaps who have sharp ears and really play to play.
This means being patient and sticking to my grind. I feel like anything other than that would be a "larp". Even if it paid well. At least for me.

In your case definitely insist on bringing the jams to your place. The drummer should schlep the least when possible. Especially if they are the band leader.
You're absolutely right. I'm not desperate to be in a band, and I'd rather build my own project than to play a bunch of covers for a few hundred. Sure, money is nice but I don't inherently need it from music at this point and if I were to give my valuable time away from family I should most definitely be picky on where that time is spent.

I dont need to play Thursday night guys night every week and a show 1 or two times a months. Been there and done that.
 

someguy01

Platinum Member
I cannot grasp your issue as I am the shittiest player in every room.
At least I know how the others feel when I show up. :ROFLMAO:
 

C. Dave Run

Gold Member
Being that I have no desire to jam with anyone anymore, I'm the best, worst, and everyone in between in the room. Until my wife gets home. She wins.

I understand the frustration however. I have a bunch of friends who play instruments for fun. No one takes their instruments seriously. They want to jam, I've humored it. Most times the song doesnt make it to the end. It is never anything serious, so no one gets upset.

We had one good "performance". We all ended up at the same party. Instruments were already there. Everyone was already drunk. There were like 5 guitar players. I played a First Act kit owned by a 6 year old. It was actually quite fun that time.
 

bearblastbeats

Senior Member
Being that I have no desire to jam with anyone anymore, I'm the best, worst, and everyone in between in the room. Until my wife gets home. She wins.

I understand the frustration however. I have a bunch of friends who play instruments for fun. No one takes their instruments seriously. They want to jam, I've humored it. Most times the song doesnt make it to the end. It is never anything serious, so no one gets upset.

We had one good "performance". We all ended up at the same party. Instruments were already there. Everyone was already drunk. There were like 5 guitar players. I played a First Act kit owned by a 6 year old. It was actually quite fun that time.
When The stars align like that it can be awesome.

These guys are the B team of players, but they have shows booked so it wouldn't a total waste.

I could look at it as getting paid for shedding and being active again. Might turn into something... might get more players to see me play also. Worst case is I play a few shows and if I don't like it then I tell them thanks and move on.
 

Jasta 11

Well-known Member
When The stars align like that it can be awesome.

These guys are the B team of players, but they have shows booked so it wouldn't a total waste.

I could look at it as getting paid for shedding and being active again. Might turn into something... might get more players to see me play also. Worst case is I play a few shows and if I don't like it then I tell them thanks and move on.
I'd say do the gigs, and dont be the worst guy on stage. People who see a live band will comment " what a great (drummer/bassist etc) or man that same player sucked. Just play the best you can ( genneraly speaking, not to you ) and keep your chin up. like you say, you can always bow out and you will be networking while being out thre playing.
 

eamesuser

Silver Member
I have played in a few bands where the players were not top notch,one band could be so bad it just dragged my playing down to nothing,it was exhausting,however if this band will listen to you and take direction from you you might be able to improve them enough to where you like playing with them and they will be good enough to stay booked.
 

bearblastbeats

Senior Member
I have played in a few bands where the players were not top notch,one band could be so bad it just dragged my playing down to nothing,it was exhausting,however if this band will listen to you and take direction from you you might be able to improve them enough to where you like playing with them and they will be good enough to stay booked.
Yea I think you're right. I think they are willing to want to learn more better songs, the bassist is actually pretty good and him and I jammed out Tom Sawyer and Limelight since he's huge into rush. Id like to bring some Toto, Steely Dan, and supertramp on the mix. So if those dudes are on board then this just might be the thing for me.

It also helps that they have grown a little following and have gigs booked. So its not starting from ground zero.
 

SmoothOperator

Gold Member
Sounds like a recipe for conflict. At some point the "leader" will go on an ego trip inspired by jealousy. To transfer experience from other domains. I've tried that before, keep your head down and take the money, but eventually they know, and will feel compelled to dig on you.
 

GetAgrippa

Diamond Member
What about singing and harmonizing-Any talent there? B team musicians can still sound great with talented singing.
 

ColdFusion

Active Member
I could look at it as getting paid for shedding and being active again.
This is actually a helpful way to look at it.

The quality of my solo shedding has improved to the point that most local projects wouldn't feel "richer" to me for the time spent, than what I'm already doing at home. But my shed routine is already installed and humming away.
So what I'm saying is that if you don't already have an electrifying practice routine, you may as well take advantage of this out-of the-house drumming experience.
Working with people who are at least making the effort is good experience all around.

But seriously mate, don't get fleas from your new bandmates.. I was :ROFLMAO: reading your OP when it got to the part "I left the jam session itching.." Your situation just kept getting grosser by the hour, lol.
 

Arkansmay

Active Member
But are they good guys?

Now I get that obviously there's a minimum skill level that you might want - same here- but Im finding myself looking for the best, or rather most compatible people. I'm to where the quality of the people are the main thing. I just don't care how good anyone is musically anymore if they're someone I don't enjoy the company of. It's tough. I was about to start my own similar thread about the search for musical friends and/or a band.

I can't hang with a filthy practice space though lol, so yeah that's gross.
 
I think it’s going to be a tough road to find the Perfect situation , you may have to compromise and work through the process . If there’s talent and you see growth potential it could be worthwhile. I might give it a second chance. Send them all a song list to learn for the next time, that way your not wasting too much time.
 

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
Been going through the trials and tribulations of finding a new set of players to no avail.

I sat in with a set last night, decent set of guys, but just... not to romance previous players, couldn't cut the cloth.

Now, it wasnt all bad, we played for 3 or so hours, but it felt like, well no, it was me leading the pack. Tbey relied on my to tell them what to play.

They offered me the gig and its mine to lose. The guys are decent players, easy to get along with and essentially having fun and playing out trumps even playing with better musicians who don't leave their garage.

If I were to continue to play with them, I'd have to get them to play at my place. No offense to the guys place but it was over loaded with useless gear and smelled bad. I left their last night itching as if it was overrun with fleas. Really turned off by that but its slim pickings here for ccompetent players my neck of the woods.

I'd say invite them to your place. Maybe the previous host will see what a decent practice space looks like and he may decide to clean up a bit. Plus, you shouldn't have to haul gear back and forth.

I'd give it a few more practices, and just concentrate on having fun and making some decent music. Always remember that you aren't married to this band. If something more interesting comes along, you can always play with the other band too.
 

bearblastbeats

Senior Member
I'd say invite them to your place. Maybe the previous host will see what a decent practice space looks like and he may decide to clean up a bit. Plus, you shouldn't have to haul gear back and forth.

I'd give it a few more practices, and just concentrate on having fun and making some decent music. Always remember that you aren't married to this band. If something more interesting comes along, you can always play with the other band too.
How would I go about the whole, "Hey, can we play at my place because yours stinks?" thing.
 
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