When did you stop feeling like a Noob?

MaryO

Platinum Member
So it will be 2 years in March since I started this drumming journey of mine. Full of lots of ups and LOTS of downs (always seems like one step forward and three steps back for me!) but slowly, very slowly, it's coming along. However, I still feel like such a beginner. I know you never stop learning and there's always someone better out there but I just feel like there's is so little I know and understand. Wondereing if I'll ever get to that point when I no longer feel like a noob or beginner.

What was that turning point for you? When did you start to realize that you were going beyond the point of just someone learning the basics and actually turning out music or playing with some level of skill?
 

x_25

Member
When you have learned all the things that make you go "oh! That's how it's done!" Meaning likely never.
 

Deathmetalconga

Platinum Member
So it will be 2 years in March since I started this drumming journey of mine. Full of lots of ups and LOTS of downs (always seems like one step forward and three steps back for me!) but slowly, very slowly, it's coming along. However, I still feel like such a beginner. I know you never stop learning and there's always someone better out there but I just feel like there's is so little I know and understand. Wondereing if I'll ever get to that point when I no longer feel like a noob or beginner.

What was that turning point for you? When did you start to realize that you were going beyond the point of just someone learning the basics and actually turning out music or playing with some level of skill?
Playing gigs and enjoying audience appreciation was the turning point, where I started feeling really competent.

At the same time, there is some value to keeping an inner noob. It keeps you grounded, serves as a healthy check on your ego and can be a source of enthusiasm. There are things I thought about the drumset when I was a noob that I wish I could recapture.
 

opentune

Platinum Member
...when I started playing out, with a band.

I agree with DMC its best to preserve your 'inner noob' forever.
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
When I stopped caring if I was a "noob" or not, I stopped feeling like a noob. All you can do is practice a lot, listen to a ton of music, and play your best. Develop your own style, play with anyone you can, and don't compare yourself to other pro drummers.

If I was really pressed for a straight answer, I'd have to say that even though I can play most things I come up with, it's still pretty easy for my teacher to come up with an exercise that makes me once again "feel like a noob". I'll never be done with my learning on drums and music. And finally, to really answer; because this is music, I think the best skill barometer is other musicians telling you that they enjoy your playing and like making music with you.
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
Since my start was in school concert band etc, I'll have to say it was when I went from 3 guys playing and taking lessons to being included in the band and orchestra. Also when I played my first gig, sitting behind a full set.
 

Mad About Drums

Pollyanna's Agent
What was that turning point for you? When did you start to realize that you were going beyond the point of just someone learning the basics and actually turning out music or playing with some level of skill?
When bands started to hire me as a drummer.

However, I was fortunate enough to play with musicians which were much better than I, so I always felt like a noob, lol. I've only been the "daddy" in a couple of bands, so most of the bands I played, I was the one with the less knowledge and experience. Even after more than 30 years, I still feel like a genuine "noob" in certain areas in drumming, but I can play a beat or two with some conviction :)

I'm always amazed when I receive compliment upon my drumming, the last time it was from Michele Drees at the LSD, needless to say, I was chuffed about it, but I don't rate my playing very highly at all.

You'll know when the turning point happen Mary :)
 

Otto

Platinum Member
Anytime I start not feeling "noob"-ish I reign my ego back in and get back to the productive mindset of a beginner.(at least I try to)
 

Andy

Administrator
Staff member
I'm always amazed when I receive compliment upon my drumming, the last time it was from Michele Drees at the LSD, needless to say, I was chuffed about it,
And that's praise indeed coming from a player of Michele's stature, who herself grossly underrates her own playing!

I think "noob" is time & experience related rather than ability related. It's perfectly possible to be a "noob" yet insanely technically talented. It's also quite common to not be rated as a "noob", yet be of limited ability/talent/whatever measure you want to apply.

The first time I no longer felt like a "noob", was the first time I got paid to play. That said, I felt like a "noob" when I returned to playing after 20+ years off the throne. Not sure I'm over that yet ;)
 
A

Anthony Amodeo

Guest
after over 30 years of playing , and 20 plus years of touring, and recording , ....every time I think I am out of that phase I meet someone or study with someone who puts me right back into that noob state

and honestly I like it that way

I am an eternal student of the game

anyone who does not consider themselves the same is a fool
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
When did I stop feeling like a N00b?
Saturday night, June 15th, 2008. 8:48 PM

:)

Honestly, I never felt like N00b. I always thought I was really good, even when I wasn't. I was delusional for sure, lol probably still am. The day I didn't cringe when listening back was a good day though. I had 2 different teachers, the first one when I was 15 who taught me foot technique and the second guy was when I was 25 who taught me hand technique. I was crap until the hand teacher. After him, I played for 2 years full time, then took a 20 year break, economic reasons, I needed to make real money. It took me about 5 years after returning from the break to start to feel good about myself. Which was sometime in 2008. You have to play gigs to get good though, you can only go so far playing covers in your basement. You have to get out there and be responsible for your time. Parties, benefits, open mics are great...anything you can do to just play real music with real people.

Mary I can't wait until you post a thread about your first gig. Make it this year, OK? You're ready.
 

Anon La Ply

Renegade
I've been a beginner since 1976, although I didn't realise it until a few years ago when I joined this forum. Like Larry, I thought I was the bees knees on drums before then :)

I'm in a push phase at the moment trying to fill in some of the holes in my technique - if you tried to sell Swiss cheese with that many holes you'd be accused of selling air!

That's okay. No orphans died as a result of my stiff left wrist or dicey footwork.
 

Drumolator

Platinum Member
It was too long ago to remember. I probably thought I was good when I was not. I can play most of what I want to play, but I am still just an OK drummer. Any time I think I am pretty good, all I have to do is listen to Colaiuta, Weckl, DeJohnette, etc. That puts me in my place quickly. Peace and goodwill.
 

BacteriumFendYoke

Platinum Member
It never astounds me how small I feel in the Drumming World.

I've been playing for ten-and-a-half years. Since September 2002. I had just turned fourteen. A few years later, I stopped feeling like an utter 'noob' when I recorded a session with a friend of mine and listened to my playing and it sounded good. Just a few months ago, I stopped by his house and he still had the original tracks - and it still sounded good.

Putting that into context though, I come on here and listen to players every day that are mechanically and musically far superior to my own ability. It makes me feel small but also confident, knowing that one day I might be at that level if I were to practice and really focus.

I'm a good player. I've improved enormously in the last two years when I started playing more seriously again (I lapsed somewhat at University because of a lack of practice space and time) and my playing is coming along nicely - but in the context of dozens of players I hear every day, I'm an absolute 'noob', which I'm happy with.
 

TTNW

Pioneer Member
Playing gigs and enjoying audience appreciation was the turning point, where I started feeling really competent.

At the same time, there is some value to keeping an inner noob. It keeps you grounded, serves as a healthy check on your ego and can be a source of enthusiasm. There are things I thought about the drumset when I was a noob that I wish I could recapture.
Exactly this ^ for me.

I would say you can cut yourself a break on the "noob" status. You are no longer a beginner, right?

However, if you start posting the "I need a do everything ride" thread. Back to "noob" for you. ;-)
 

BabyBob

Silver Member
When I stop thinking I'm one....or maybe when your band is the opening act for your favorite band.
 
Well, I think I'll always feel and play like a noob ... but the first time someone handed me money for playing the drums was a definite milestone ;)
 
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