What's your latest purchase?

Hadn't heard of those. From what I'm reading, they seem to be a nice alternative to quite a few in-ear alternatives.
If you have two drummers playing at the exact same time is it possible to use these drumeo ear monitors at the exact same time that the two drummers are drumming?
 
If you have two drummers playing at the exact same time is it possible to use these drumeo ear monitors at the exact same time that the two drummers are drumming?
They are wired, so I can't see a limitation any more than with any other wired headset. I have this 4 channel headphone amp I've used in practice. https://www.guitarcenter.com/PreSonus/HP4-Discrete-4-Channel-Headphone-Amp-1274034489530.gc
There are cheaper and certainly higher dollar alternatives too.
 
They are wired, so I can't see a limitation any more than with any other wired headset. I have this 4 channel headphone amp I've used in practice. https://www.guitarcenter.com/PreSonus/HP4-Discrete-4-Channel-Headphone-Amp-1274034489530.gc
There are cheaper and certainly higher dollar alternatives too.
That brings me to the next question... I suppose there can be as many people wearing ear monitors in a band but if you were on stage with an audience there's also music that they can hear. I don't know the logistics of any of that.

My question is... my son and I both drum together and those ear monitors would be great for us but when we have people that want to come to hear us play how are we able to play the music out loud at the same time that we're wearing ear monitors?
 
That brings me to the next question... I suppose there can be as many people wearing ear monitors in a band but if you were on stage with an audience there's also music that they can hear. I don't know the logistics of any of that.

My question is... my son and I both drum together and those ear monitors would be great for us but when we have people that want to come to hear us play how are we able to play the music out loud at the same time that we're wearing ear monitors?
A lot of the better headphone amps (like the one I posted earlier) have line in and out, so you can hear the music on your headset, while the audience can also hear via the PA. Some allow an additional "aux" input per channel for individual monitoring, while leaving the mix, from the source to be unaffected. Say, the bassist wants to hear more of himself, he can take a second input from his bass or cabinet, or whatever, feed it back through on his headphone channel so he can control not only his own volume, but also his bass (monitor channel) separately. Eliminates having to ask for this separately from a sound guy, which most don't have handy in practice. Here's an example:
 
A lot of the better headphone amps (like the one I posted earlier) have line in and out, so you can hear the music on your headset, while the audience can also hear via the PA. Some allow an additional "aux" input per channel for individual monitoring, while leaving the mix, from the source to be unaffected. Say, the bassist wants to hear more of himself, he can take a second input from his bass or cabinet, or whatever, feed it back through on his headphone channel so he can control not only his own volume, but also his bass (monitor channel) separately. Eliminates having to ask for this separately from a sound guy, which most don't have handy in practice. Here's an example:
Would I actually need something that advanced? If it's just my son and I drumming together? And a couple of people listening. Is there any other way to do it in a less expensive way?
 
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Speed bearings and new springs for my Flying Dragon pedals from Sweetwater. Great packaging and a bag of sweets.
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So far, I installed the bearing on one pedal and don’t notice much difference! Even shot a video of the two side-by-side. The master has been slower than the slave all along. With the new bearing, I notice a little improvement in noise. The bearing is definitely quieter than original, but no now of that silky pedal movement like the comparison videos I’ve seen.

Could be the springs too which is why I got new ones. The old are 20 years old.

I’ve been more than happy with the Flying Dragon. I figure the master may naturally be slower with the shorter shaft of the double pedal. The bearing marketing looked intriguing though.

Maybe the Flying Dragons are just that good to begin with, so improvements minimal? We’ll see….
 
Alright I’ll take back what I said before. The bearing makes a noticeable difference. Pedal seems more powerful, but I did have to back the tension off the spring. Things were just too buzzy. The Gibraltar springs were a total fail. Way too short, so way too much tension when installed.

All in all I’m still not totally sold on the bearing. Not for the Flying Dragon anyway.
 
Alright I’ll take back what I said before. The bearing makes a noticeable difference. Pedal seems more powerful, but I did have to back the tension off the spring. Things were just too buzzy. The Gibraltar springs were a total fail. Way too short, so way too much tension when installed.

All in all I’m still not totally sold on the bearing. Not for the Flying Dragon anyway.
I’ve used the speedstar for both DW5000 and Jojo PB and the difference was immediate due to the lack of friction on the spring hook rubbing the rubber clamp thing. It may depend on preference, I play a rather loose spring and definitely off the head…and/or it’s credit Yamaha’s original design. Never tried the dragon, sounds like a good pedal.
 
The Flying Dragon has a smaller shaft that spins very freely on its own and almost the identical hook as the 5000. I’ll keep them and keep playing with them. I need to find some new springs in proper length.

To me the Flying Dragon is as close to a perfect design as they came. Too bad Yamaha abandoned them.
 
I bought a couple Yamaha CH750 Short Boom Cymbal Arms from Chicago Music Exchange.
After using hats, 1 ride and 1 crash for most of the time I've been playing,
I switched to hats, and 2 rides about 10 years ago.

I decided to get wild :ROFLMAO: and added a crash to the two rides I've been using.
The Yamaha arms were the way to go for me.
I've got one on a Ludwig set, and another on a Yamaha set, in the 3rd holes of the bass drum mounts.
They can be used with clamps off of cymbal stands too.

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Yamaha - Copy.JPG

I also bought an extra 10" Stage Custom tom from Drum Center of Portsmouth.
Good experiences with both places. I'd definitely buy from them again.
 
I bought this 3 weeks ago from Steve Maxwell's shop. 9"x14" stainless brass. Big daddy! Sounds great!
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My budget doesn't permit me to buy gear as often as I'd like, but I always have enough to get the little upgrades that I need, as I need them.
Sometimes I come to a crossroad where I absolutely must get a certain piece of gear to continue the journey. When my stylistic journeys finally brought me to the realm of metalcore I knew I had to upgrade a few things.

The first thing I had to do was get a bass trigger for my V-Drums that was big enough it could accommodate some wide-set beaters. My current double pedal was old and wobbly, and not very photogenic for videos. So the first thing I did was get a larger size Roland bass trigger (KD-85) and a decent Pearl Redline double kick pedal to go with it.
I don't mind buying things gently used, and so I got the kick pad from Japan, and the Redline from France! (Ebay and Reverb, no issues)

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Pearl Redline & KD-85


My acoustic drum kit also needed a bit of "heavy metal treatment". The one snare drum on my acoustic kit was a basic Pearl Masters "all maple" I bought ten years ago at Guitar Center. It's a nice warm drum, with decent sensitivity for jazzy snare work. It also cuts and rings well enough for funk and hiphop stuff.
But one thing I learned very quickly recording metalcore music on my V-kit, the snare drum sound has to be extra bold and cutting even just to hold its own in a chugging distorted heavy metal mix.
Even on my V-kit where I have some control to shape the snare drum sound, there are only two voices I dare use for heavy metal, the rest just get swallowed up and drowned out, even just by the sound of the persistent double bass kicks. Let alone chugging rhythm guitar and screaming guttural vocals.

So with this in mind I decided to go with a metal-shell snare drum for my acoustic kit. I figured steel would do the trick, given that I'm not expecting this drum to be terribly versatile, and I need something I know will have significant cutting power. But I ended up going with a brass Sensitone "Heritage" snare from Pearl, just in case a steel one might be "too hot/rude" for a starting place. My new snare arrived today and I can already tell that it's going to be a pretty good fit.

It doesn't sound like I "want" it to sound. Of course the sound in my head was unrealistically polished and probably more versatile than I can expect from a basic brass drum. However, when playing metalcore style beats, with chopping trash stack and thundering double kick, yessir the brass snare has a "throat" to it that I can feel cutting through the mix. It's not as cutting or even as "ringing" as I hoped it would be, but boy it's got something extra that the maple snare just doesn't have. It's like an internal explosive "pop" whenever I dig deep into the brass drum. This is exactly the kind of characteristic needed to make the snare drum feel authoritative in a metal mix.
Definitely the maple snare is more sensitive for ghosting and such. The ghost notes on the brass drum are present, but sound more "lo-fi" like there's just less information in the sound. Whereas the maple drum really kind of shines with delicate, fast, silky notes, the brass just kind of 'coughs', lol. To be fair, I haven't had time to explore the actual range of this new drum. This is just my impression from a quick tightening of the heads and some thoughtful groove experiments.

So now that I know what the brass sounds like, I think I can confidently pick up a Heritage steel snare and be able to use it happily, just for those moments when I need some serious cutting metal. FWIW, I got the Sensitone brass drum from ProAudioStar. They do indeed sell brand new items in a factory box, at "used" prices. So +1 for that company if you need a discount but all the used reverb stuff is scuffed and overpriced.

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Pearl Sensitone Heritage Brass

And finally, some further treatment to make my acoustic kit sound more metalcore. I bought a pair of hard wood bass beaters, and if that's not enough to get the thing clicking, I got a set of kicker stickers to add articulation to my double bass licks. The one in the photo has a plastic-like disc in the strike zone. And there's another one I ordered that uses aluminum, for a really really clicky kick.

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Kick Drum Kit by Danmar

Update: I’ve spent some time playing the new snare drum, and experimenting with the kick drum accessories. I’m growing more fond of the brass snare drum as I go. After tuning it decently tight and getting the bottom head tension proportionate, it makes a pretty smooth, consistent sound. Like I said the ghost notes are more metallic sounding, not so warm. But this snare still feels pretty good even playing some fluttery fusion stuff. Oh and the rimshot is nice too. It took some technique adjustment to find it, as it’s in a slightly different spot than the rimshot on my maple snare, and also has a different sound. This is kind of exciting to me, having a second rimshot sound that’s more “cracking” than my maple rimshot.
At the end of the day this drum has a pretty simple role to fill. If I take this drum out to play and it can produce a backbeat that actually cuts through distorted guitar and holds it's own in the mix, then I consider it a solid purchase.

When I ordered my red hardwood bass drum beater from Danmar, there was only one left in stock. So I ended up ordering a red Gibraltar beater as a “mate” to the single Danmar beater. What I didn’t realize was the Gibraltar beater is MUCH bigger and heavier than the Danmar (See photo).
I have since ordered another Danmar and another Gibraltar, so I’ll have a pair of each. In the meantime I did some recording and experimentation with the two red beaters and compared them to my stock 4-way Pearl beaters.

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Gibralter (L) Danmar (R)
& Plastic Kick Patch


The big red Gibraltar beater is surprisingly big and heavy. At first glance most people are probably thinking, ‘this is just a bit too big’. An indeed I would not recommend this beater be used unless one also uses a reinforcement patch to prevent denting of the batter head. That said, the big Gibraltar beater surprised me in my recording experiments. When I used it on the bare batter head with no extra sound patch, it seemed to make the sweetest sound out of all of the combinations. It’s not super mysterious when I think about it, the extra mass just hits bigger and harder and you just hear ‘more bass drum’. Also the wide beater head hits and slaps with enough surface area that you don’t need any extra “click” to get the point across.
I actually would recommend the big Gibraltar beater for hard rock drummers who aren’t going to use a double kick, but really want that downbeat and bass line to hit hard and clear. Don’t forget the reinforcement patch, lol.

The kicker patch with the plastic insert (in photo, on batter head) does a pretty good job of bringing your kick strokes to the front of the mix. Even when shedding unplugged with ear plugs in, I can finally hear what the bass drum is doing, rather than just feel it. A good test is when you do those little two-stroke roughs that are popular in metal fills. If you can actually hear both separated “clicks” then your patch is doing its job.

But again, another pretty big caveat. When recording with the kicker patch there is a new challenge, one that is probably common for these kinds of accessories. I noticed that the combination of hard painted wood hitting smooth plastic creates a ‘squeak’ sound that is nearly impossible to avoid. It’s not something you notice when you are just shedding without mics, as it's actually fairly quiet. But when you stick a microphone inside your bass drum it amplifies all the natural rubbing and bouncing between the surfaces (you can even hear if your old double pedal needs oil). You can mitigate the beater squeaking by striking hard and square and then pulling the beater off quickly, but it’s still annoying. I’m going to try backing the mic away from the head and see if I can get the punch and click, without the squeaks.

FWIW, the stock Pearl 4-way beaters have a hard black plastic surface that I also tested with the kick patch. The hard surfaces on the Pearl 4-way beaters actually seem to click more articulately than the hard wooden beaters did. That is, when paired with the Danmar patch with the plastic insert. The Danmars likely have more mass and will sound "metal" on a wider variety of batter heads. But the Pearl plastic is hard to compete with cuz it already just sounds super 'plasticky'. I just wanted to include this detail for future people researching accessories for playing metal.

I ask because I found the metal Danmar patches to be too much for 22" kicks, and sound better on 24" kicks. There's just too much click which kills the low end in a live setting setting.
Yessir, I haven't even tried the aluminum "patch". I laughed out loud when I saw it, it's literally a solid chunk of aluminum with some glue on it, lol. I don't even want to try putting it on my 22" drum. But the non-aluminum one, the skinny one with the plastic insert, that one sounds pretty good.
 
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Jim Krueger- CCW Drums 6.5x14 Cherry stave
 

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