whats the difference between press roll and buzz roll?

Dave_Major

Silver Member
Hey guys, heres how I understand it.

A closed roll and a buzz roll are the same thing. A press roll is just a variation on the same rudiment. All of them are multiple bounce rolls (rudiment 4 on the PAS list)
There are plenty of threads on how to play them so you can do a search if you wanted to get some techincal tips.

The press roll is a closed roll with added pressure on the head. You litterally press harder into the head. The adds an urgency to it, to my ear.

Easy way to hear the difference is that a closed roll has a really smooth sound. It is designed to sound like one note. It is used in orchestral playing (though not exclusively) so youtube some orchestral stuff and try and get an example.

New Orleans guys use the press roll so check out some guys to hear that.

I hope that all made sense

Dave
 
Last edited:
C

Casper "DrPowerStroke" Paludan

Guest
The closed roll and a press roll are the same thing. A buzz roll is the same thing again. If you press the stick harder into the head, the result will be an accented pattern, which, by definition, is not a roll, but a series of buzz notes.
Casper
 

Dave_Major

Silver Member
Fair point Casper. I guess you could argue that what i would define as a press roll could be just a buzzed accent pattern.

If you press more into the head you definitely get a different sound so I would call that a pressed roll as opposed to a closed roll. I've tried to find examples on youtube of the 2 but i haven't yet.

Guess this is a huge grey are in drumming

Dave
 

dairyairman

Platinum Member
isn't a press roll like you said but you press hard at the start of the roll and then back off, almost like an extended accent?
 

caddywumpus

Platinum Member
A buzz roll, orchestral roll, closed roll...they're all terminology for the same thing. A press roll is the same basic idea, except you're using only the "pressing" part of the technique.

In a nutshell, a press roll is what you see jr high students in band class doing, trying to play a closed/buzz/orchestral roll, but not really knowing what they're doing...
 

bonzolead

Platinum Member
IMO a great press,buzz roll whatever you want too call it is one of the hardest things too master in my 35 yrs of playing.

A great buzz or press roll you can't. hear the difference between the sticks it's just a consistent,even roll hence the name BUZZ.

the clip with Ian Paice is great as is a lot of things that Ian Paice does is great LOL

Bonzolead
 

Gretsch09

Member
A press roll would be used more in marching snare right? When you dig real hard on a falam head? I wouldn't press too hard on a regular head in fear of ruining it.
 

drovja

Senior Member
A press roll would be used more in marching snare right? When you dig real hard on a falam head? I wouldn't press too hard on a regular head in fear of ruining it.

Most rolls done in marching band are open, with some stylistic exceptions depending on what exactly is being played. Press rolls do happen in marching band, and are often quite short so that you have to 'press' to get a good sounding roll quickly.

I don't see a press roll damaging a head in any way; it's just not physically possible to get a clean multiple bounce roll played with the same velocity that most drumset players use on every backbeat they play.
 

mrchattr

Gold Member
There is NO difference between press and buzz rolls. Just two different words for the same thing.

If you press harder, but keep the roll even, it's just a buzz roll, or press roll, that is accented.

If you press harder, and it makes it an uneven sound, then it's a roll with accents.

When you hit harder at the start of the roll, and then make it even the rest of the way through, it's just a buzz roll with a sforzando (a dynamic marking that means hit it hard then back off).
 

caddywumpus

Platinum Member
There is NO difference between press and buzz rolls. Just two different words for the same thing.

As I have understood it, was taught at the university level, and have researched extensively for papers at college, the "press roll" (although considered a generalized term now) originally referred to the technique of pressing into the drum while rolling to get a louder dynamic out of the snare drum, but is done without the "release" half of the rolling technique.. It is used for performing a buzz/closed/orchestral roll at loud volumes.

When you do a ppp roll for a symphony piece in a concert hall, I don't consider that a press roll, since there is no actual "pressing" going on.

I'm a stickler for preserving accurate percussion terminology, sorry. I mean, just check out my posts in any of the "double stroke roll" threads. :p :D
 

mrchattr

Gold Member
As I have understood it, was taught at the university level, and have researched extensively for papers at college, the "press roll" (although considered a generalized term now) originally referred to the technique of pressing into the drum while rolling to get a louder dynamic out of the snare drum, but is done without the "release" half of the rolling technique.. It is used for performing a buzz/closed/orchestral roll at loud volumes.

When you do a ppp roll for a symphony piece in a concert hall, I don't consider that a press roll, since there is no actual "pressing" going on.

I'm a stickler for preserving accurate percussion terminology, sorry. I mean, just check out my posts in any of the "double stroke roll" threads. :p :D

Interesting...in all of my studies, it has always been an interchangable term. I mean, the idea of playing harder (pressing) to play louder, makes sense...but at ppp, in modern musical terminology, you can still play a press roll. Now, granted, I don't look at older books...so maybe, as you seem to imply, it is just that the term has evolved over time. Regardless, a press roll, even when using the full press technique, should still have every stroke even.
 
Top