What's ONE piece of gear that made you change the way you play your whole kit?

Good Karma

Well-known member
Definitely a single kick pedal

I got rid of my double kick pedals and bought a single pedal. This allowed me to move my hi hat over to a more comfortable position and started using it more. It's like I've rediscovered my hi hat, so many cool sounds that add so much more to my playing then another kick pedal.
 

SmoothOperator

Gold Member
Yep. And this is why I hate them being billed as beginner or "student" cymbals. It's really harmful to development of musicality. I guess the idea is that at the start you don't understand how all that works anyway, but as mentioned, I wish someone made it more clear to me before I put in all that time. I guess the good news is that I adjusted quickly, mostly because things just worked so much easier... But the harder thing to do is get all the new control skills under your belt. With a real cymbal every little thing translates to a different color, with the stamped stuff, you kinda get one sound and have to whack pretty hard to get it. New set of skills that I could have been honing in for years!
I feel grateful that I had cheap cymbals and drums to start with, before I developed religion with hearing protection. Though some of the stamps these days are louder than they used to be.
 

TMe

Senior Member
I'd definitely have to say sticks.
What model of stick are you using? Sucherman's SD330?

I'm loving the Jim Kilpatrick KP2 maple sticks lately. The weight is in between a 5B and 2B hickory, but the diameter at the butt end is substantially larger than a 2B. Most of the weight is in the butt end, so they hit more like a 5B than a 2B. I find they give a big sound with a light touch.

https://www.long-mcquade.com/62698/Drums/Sticks_Mallets_Brushes/Scott_s_Highland_Serv/KP2_Signature_Snare_Stick_-_Red.htm
 
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philrudd

Senior Member
Reading the above responses, I'd probably agree with recording and listening back, but when I read 'gear' in the title I was thinking actual drum parts.

For that, strangely enough, I'd have to say my hi-hat tambourine. For years I used my right foot (I'm southpaw) very little. I got the tambourine attachment as a lark to use on one specific project, and once I started tapping my right foot, timekeeping seemed to snap into focus a little better. And, just using that foot eventually got me working on hi-hat barks and accents that I'd never really incorporated before.

Plus, with a small ensemble, I find it goes some ways towards presenting a more 'full' sound by providing a bit of percussion. Pretty well-spent $30 if you ask me!
 

bud7h4

Silver Member
For me it wasn't the addition of a piece of gear but the removal of a couple of toms. Might sound crazy but I feel like the fewer drums on the kit, the less automatic or mindless my playing is. Emphasis on sticking, concepts, deliberate application of rudiments, all become more necessary when you strip away the flash.

Having a lot of voices can make you sound like you're doing more than you are. I haven't found that to be a good way to improve.
 
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iCe

Senior Member
Double pedal. Opened a whole new world of rhythmic possibilities. Sticks also popped to mind, but i think just by having a double pedal makes some grooves easier to play (leading with the left foot for example when playing off-beats)
 

Good Karma

Well-known member
For me it wasn't the addition of a piece of gear but the removal of a couple of toms. Might sound crazy but I feel like the fewer drums on the kit, the less automatic or mindless my playing is. Emphasis on sticking, concepts, deliberate application of rudiments, all become more necessary when you strip away the flash.

Having a lot of voices can make you sound like you're doing more than you are. I haven't found that to be a good way to improve.
Sometimes less is more
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Currently, for the first time EVER, I set up 2 bass drums on my practice kit. Not that I would ever bring 2 bass drums to any of my gigs.
However, I'm finding that it is helping quite a bit with basic coordination between my 4 limbs. Which really helps my timing because it's baring my coordination issues. It's a good way to attempt to balance both halves of my brain. I'm finding a shuffle rhythm a challenge on 2 bass drums ala "Hot For Teacher". A whole other world of coordination practice possibilities.
 

timmdrum

Silver Member
Currently, for the first time EVER, I set up 2 bass drums on my practice kit. Not that I would ever bring 2 bass drums to any of my gigs.
However, I'm finding that it is helping quite a bit with basic coordination between my 4 limbs. Which really helps my timing because it's baring my coordination issues. It's a good way to attempt to balance both halves of my brain. I'm finding a shuffle rhythm a challenge on 2 bass drums ala "Hot For Teacher". A whole other world of coordination practice possibilities.
Nothing I perform requires double bass, but I've considered a double pedal just to work out with at home; something to give more resistance that a hi-hat spring. I've sworn I'd never play music with double bass until I achieved Bonham-ness with my single, which has never happened. That's ok- it remains a goal to strive for. :)
 

Keyholio

Member
SC-4425G.jpg

I had a big tall power tom kit and, with this to help me pull the RT's off the BD now I have flatter toms.
 
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