What's a good SLP snare to play 60s rock

Sem

Junior Member
Hello, I wanted to buy a new snare and I saw that Tama is offering a free hardcase snare case on the purchase of any of their snares right now, and since that sounds like a good offer, I think i'm gonna get a slp snare, any recommendations? I mostly play music from the 60s, I really like the hammered steel one, but I wanted to hear some opinions from people who actually owns any of those drums, are they actually worth it?
 

trickg

Silver Member
Oh man - I've never played one of these, but I've played a DW solid maple - I'd think that the SLP Solid maple would be a wonderful drum for almost anything. Maple has warmth and body, but it's also got a really nice crack. I'd think that it would work well for 60s music, especially considering that so much of that music was originally recorded on a solid shell Slingerland Radio King.
 

IBitePrettyHard

Senior Member
I'm using a jazz kit, 10' and 14' Tom's and a 18' bass drums
The metal SLP snares might be a little on the loud side for a bop kit. (the SLP Classic Dry Aluminum might be an exception). Metal drums will still work, but you may have to adjust your playing so as not to overpower the rest of the kit.

All the wood snares will work for 60s music, especially the Maple snares. I particularly like the sound of the new (2019) SLP G-Maple 6x14.

It really comes down to which sounds best to you. Check out demos of all of the snares on Youtube.

If you can give us a description of the sound you want.....using words like resonant, dry, round, fat, articulate, dark, bright, that could help us narrow it down for you.

Oh man - I've never played one of these, but I've played a DW solid maple - I'd think that the SLP Solid maple would be a wonderful drum for almost anything. Maple has warmth and body, but it's also got a really nice crack. I'd think that it would work well for 60s music, especially considering that so much of that music was originally recorded on a solid shell Slingerland Radio King.
None of the SLP snares are solid shells, unfortunately.
 
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donzo74

Junior Member
I wanted to hear some opinions from people who actually owns any of those drums, are they actually worth it?
Yes, I think the SLP drums are a good value. There are some great looking and sounding drums in the SLP line up. I have both G-Bubinga models (14x6, 14x8) and the G-Maple 13x7. They all came with good hardware and no defects in craftsmanship. All of mine came with tension adjustment on the butt of the snare strainer, too, which I think is a nice feature. Not all of them have this, though, but it's not a deal breaker for me if a snare has a simple butt or an adjustable one. I can't tell you which one would be best for "60's music" (a lot of music made in the 60's) but there are many models and materials to choose from. All of mine work well for rock.
 

trickg

Silver Member
None of the SLP snares are solid shells, unfortunately.
You're absolutely right - I didn't realize when I clicked it that not every snare on the page was an SLP - I was looking at a Star series snare. Sorry 'bout that.

From the list, the one I'd want if I was playing that kind of music would be the SLP Classic Maple or the SLP Studio Maple with the maple hoops.
 

Sem

Junior Member
The metal SLP snares might be a little on the loud side for a bop kit. (the SLP Classic Dry Aluminum might be an exception). Metal drums will still work, but you may have to adjust your playing so as not to overpower the rest of the kit.

All the wood snares will work for 60s music, especially the Maple snares. I particularly like the sound of the new (2019) SLP G-Maple 6x14.

It really comes down to which sounds best to you. Check out demos of all of the snares on Youtube.

If you can give us a description of the sound you want.....using words like resonant, dry, round, fat, articulate, dark, bright, that could help us narrow it down for you.



None of the SLP snares are solid shells, unfortunately.
I really dig fat sounding snares, i think they feel awesome when you play them and they sound huge, i'd also like for the audience to be actually able to hear the ghost notes, and maybe a good tuning range
 

Sem

Junior Member
You're absolutely right - I didn't realize when I clicked it that not every snare on the page was an SLP - I was looking at a Star series snare. Sorry 'bout that.

From the list, the one I'd want if I was playing that kind of music would be the SLP Classic Maple or the SLP Studio Maple with the maple hoops.
Star series snares look awesome too, but sadly i don't have that much budget
 

Sem

Junior Member
Yes, I think the SLP drums are a good value. There are some great looking and sounding drums in the SLP line up. I have both G-Bubinga models (14x6, 14x8) and the G-Maple 13x7. They all came with good hardware and no defects in craftsmanship. All of mine came with tension adjustment on the butt of the snare strainer, too, which I think is a nice feature. Not all of them have this, though, but it's not a deal breaker for me if a snare has a simple butt or an adjustable one. I can't tell you which one would be best for "60's music" (a lot of music made in the 60's) but there are many models and materials to choose from. All of mine work well for rock.

Yeah the maple one sounds fantastic on the internet, i wish i could be able to hear it in person, but my local music stores don't carry tama snares at all,

Also i forgot to specify the genre, we mostly play blues and psychodelic rock, but i feel like a versatile snare would be the best
 
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donzo74

Junior Member
I really dig fat sounding snares, i think they feel awesome when you play them and they sound huge, i'd also like for the audience to be actually able to hear the ghost notes, and maybe a good tuning range
we mostly play blues and psychedelic rock, but i feel like a versatile snare would be the best
Opinions vary, but based on the description you gave, the SLP drum that I have experience with that checks all of the boxes (fatness, good tuning range, articulate and audible grace notes) is the original 14x6 SLP G-Bubinga. When I first played it, the first thing that I noticed was the fatness but I also noticed that it was very articulate on grace notes, open rolls and other fast rudimental patterns. I haven't played the 14" Maple models, so I can't comment on them.
 

picodon

Silver Member
I got the Hammered Steel since a few weeks. Tune it nice and high, it sings! Funky funky drummer...

I love how he says the look goes so well with the rest of his kit. I can hardly imagine an uglier combination, but it's the sound that matters ;) for once I'm glad to have a raven black SC.
 
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Sem

Junior Member
Opinions vary, but based on the description you gave, the SLP drum that I have experience with that checks all of the boxes (fatness, good tuning range, articulate and audible grace notes) is the original 14x6 SLP G-Bubinga. When I first played it, the first thing that I noticed was the fatness but I also noticed that it was very articulate on grace notes, open rolls and other fast rudimental patterns. I haven't played the 14" Maple models, so I can't comment on them.
I just googled that one, man that thing S N A P S, it's a shame that it is apparently discontinnued
 

Winston_Wolf

Platinum Member
Well, I think the snare sound you're hearing in your head for 60s rock (and pretty much everything else too for that matter) is a Ludwig Supraphonic, so the Tama Dry Aluminum makes a lot of sense.

There's just...something about the tone of an aluminum shell that responds well in a wide tuning range from a thump to a crack. If you're wanting versatile, it should work out well.

That said, Tama's build quality is great, and I'd be surprised if ANY of the SLP snares wouldn't give you what you're looking for.
 
This one looks and sounds kinda like a good ol' acrolyte, but the hardware looks a bit better(?)
See my other post comparing an Acro and the Tama. I thought the Tama had better hardware, but they screwed the pooch with the throw off, it's not the same one that comes on other SLPs, and yes it's worse then a P85. The plastic tension adjustment screw loosen all the time.

The Tama SLP Dry Aluminum did sound better than the Acrolite to my ears though.
 

Sem

Junior Member
See my other post comparing an Acro and the Tama. I thought the Tama had better hardware, but they screwed the pooch with the throw off, it's not the same one that comes on other SLPs, and yes it's worse then a P85. The plastic tension adjustment screw loosen all the time.

The Tama SLP Dry Aluminum did sound better than the Acrolite to my ears though.
You mean Tama managed to make a worse throwoff than the p85? Damn lol
 
You mean Tama managed to make a worse throwoff than the p85? Damn lol
I exchanged my SLP Dry Aluminum 3 times and it still wouldn't hold tension... never had that problem with a fresh P85, which at least doesn't use a plastic tension knob. And the new P86 has ratcheting which is even better.

That said, I just realized I used to have a Tama Superstar snare that had a MCS70 throw off and I don't remember fighting it. Did a bad batch end up in the wild? Does it somehow acts up when coupled with a metal shell? I don't know.
 
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