What would you do if?....

RaveDrummer

Junior Member
So lil bit of a back story here, ive been playing solid for about 4 and 1/2 years now and im the back up drummer, learning rythm guitarist for our church band, and tonight got me thinking...In practice our drummer was just laying down his beats through the song, then I noticed that the snare cut out of the beat, and soon he noticed too lol, the snare head had popped and ripped clean open... luckily we had a back up snare from a donated kit for the youth and the day was saved...

My thoughts were what exactly would you do if caught live with that situation>? lol
 

Numberless

Platinum Member
If it's a local gig then a good tip is to bring a back up snare. If you're sharing the billing, the other bands could help out. If there are no other bands and no replacements, then the gig would be over, at lest for me, you could try to save a song by improvising with the rims but I wouldn't continue a full set like that.

The best thing to do is to try and prevent this situation, mostly by using common sense, if the head is old and worn down, change it a couple days before the show. Don't bash it, it'll only go so loud.
 
A

audiotech

Guest
If you are performing, either in front of an audience or during a recording session, always have a back-up piece of equipment close at hand. In this scenario, a another fully tuned snare ready to go at your side. When I gig or take my kits into a recording environment, I usually have at least two or three snare drums, an extra pedal, extra hi hat stand and a couple of extra cymbal stands. Playing in a church band you'll probably not have to be redundant with every piece, but a snare drum is your bread and butter. Sometimes you just can't stop to replace and tune a head.

Dennis
 

Pocket-full-of-gold

Platinum Member
What I have done "when" (not if), is finish out the song by playing tom rhythms or keeping a pulse on the hats/cymbals and playing a back beat on the high tom. And then swapped over to the back up snare between songs. I've never had to finish a whole gig with no back up snare, but if it ever happened, I'd do exactly the same thing.

Lesson number 1: Don't put yourself in a position where you have to. Always carry that back up snare......just in case.
 

Andy

Administrator
Staff member
Can only chime in with the same thing. I pack backup everything. Heads for all drums, spare snare, pedal, etc. Of all the spares you carry, the snare is by far the most important, apart from sticks of course!
 

Too Many Songs

Senior Member
A few weeks ago I went along to a jazz session run by a couple of friends. The drummer forgot his snare drum altogether! I agreed to sit in while he went home to get it. There followed 30 minutes of me playing creative time patterns on the ride cymbal. Not really the way I would have chosen to develop that aspect of my playing but there was a huge round of applause when I left the stage. Do you know, I suspect that most audience members don't really listen to the drummer at all :)
 

2bsticks

Platinum Member
In over35 years of playing professionally this has happened to me maybe 5 times. Mostly in my younger years playing heavy rock music. It may have been the bass drum, snare drum or a tom. What works for me is making sure my heads are not too worn out, proper tuning and I ALWAYS carry an extra set of heads. Sometimes I will supply my kit when we open up for some oldies acts and I will have an extra snare at the ready.
 

THC

Senior Member
I would immediately stop playing, stand up, yell "I can't play", and walk off stage.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Extra snare, extra pedal, extra heads, extra sticks, heck, I even keep an extra drummer in my van.

Here's another lifesaver...you know those clear plastic laminating sheets you use to laminate your drivers license or registration? If you tear your bass drum head, and the rip is smaller than a 8.5 x 11...those laminating sheets are a quick repair that will get you through till breaktime. If you hit real hard, use 2 sheets for the repair. Just peel the backing off and stick it over the rip. It won't sound as good, but it won't suck either.
 
A

audiotech

Guest
I would immediately stop playing, stand up, yell "I can't play", and walk off stage.
It would really be embarrassing if someone yelled back saying "we all knew this at the beginning of the set", lol.

Dennis
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
I've almost always carried a back up snare drum with me.

Although I have never once broken a snare head on a gig. But, you never know.
 

Drumolator

Platinum Member
I always take a second snare and bass drum pedal. That is also one reason why I do not have hole on the front head of the bass drum; I did have to use the front head to replace the batter head once. Peace and goodwill.
 

Pimento

Senior Member
I always have duct tape handy, i still dont even own a backup snare, so i have just taped over the tear or puncture and keep playing.

I am working on getting the wife to let me buy another snare though, then i wont have to use that method.
 

Homeularis

Gold Member
I always have a backup snare and a backup kick pedal. I play a double pedal but have a single for backup.
Those two things will save your life.
 

harryconway

Platinum Member
My thoughts were what exactly would you do if caught live with that situation>? lol
Though I have broken heads at band rehearsal (and a spare is always waiting close by) ... I've never, in 40+ years of gigging, ever broken a head live, in front of an audience. I change my drum heads way before it ever hit that ragged edge ... of the heads gone too far ...​
 

mg33

Member
Agree with harryconway ... in 40 years of playing I've never busted a head.
I don't play lightly but ... I think it has something to do with angle of stick on head.

My 15 year old son plays now ... and busts everything. He doesn't play all that much
harder, it's just that he is all over the place.

Now that I've said all that ... i might start carrying a backup ;) In case I jinxed myself.

I do have nightmares of playing a big show and something is missing ... like sticks or pedals and the show is starting.
 
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