What will improve my drumset playing more, studying concert snare drum or marching snare drum?

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
Wood would be a real challenge. How about a few notes with each?
cool....if I successfully pass this test, then you have to send me video of you playing Book Reports at 120bpm...it doesn't even have to be on a Kevlar head b/c I know you won't have one, but it does have to be on a snare tuned to where you can hear the articulation of the elements of the rudiment at that tempo...

this all makes me think that we should start. a "Challenges" thread...
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
cool....if I successfully pass this test, then you have to send me video of you playing Book Reports at 120bpm...it doesn't even have to be on a Kevlar head b/c I know you won't have one, but it does have to be on a snare tuned to where you can hear the articulation of the elements of the rudiment at that tempo...

this all makes me think that we should start. a "Challenges" thread...
“Book Reports” sounds like a bunch of rudimental boredom, probably has Egg Beaters and Cheesedas lol. How about “The Winner” by Markovich? I’ll play it on a RealFeel. I’ll play it at tempo.
 

Jeremy Bender

Platinum Member
Myself, I think the approach that Tommy Igoe teaches, or Bruce Becker & Dave Weckl's videos on hand technique are a good foundation to start with for any drummer. Once you decide what area of musical styles you want to really focus on i.e. concert, marching, or kit you can further your studies and adjust your hands. Not everyone's hands are the same, for ex: Manu Katche and Chester Thompson play a similar grip but not like Weckl or Gadd's.

Steve Smith is a great example of someone who has a hybrid of hand technique- he has a book and dvd on 4 positions of matched grip. plays in a rock band, has rudimental chops chops and he plays in an acoustic jazz band. His YT videos are fantastic too.
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
Ha I see the subliminal "pee-ing" contest-german "grip" (hell I don't even have to grip it), hard mallet, (yeah when I was younger-you gotta bend over, in concert-yeah I can see that, but marching? You gotta walk backwards. If you fellas don't both produce videos I"m calling "bull crap". "Real feel" is there any other? So I'm waiting for the "call" then "raise" so it can start-enough talk. ROFL-Merry Christmas
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
Ha I see the subliminal "pee-ing" contest-german "grip" (hell I don't even have to grip it), hard mallet, (yeah when I was younger-you gotta bend over, in concert-yeah I can see that, but marching? You gotta walk backwards. If you fellas don't both produce videos I"m calling "bull crap". "Real feel" is there any other? So I'm waiting for the "call" then "raise" so it can start-enough talk. ROFL-Merry Christmas
I’m already practicing the “book report” on my tummy with my hands. Over at the in-laws’ for Christmas, so no sticks or pad until late this afternoon
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
So you didn’t mention that “book report” is just a rudiment. I’m more than happy to work those up. Pick a tempo, I’ll post a video of my playing them on a RealFeel.
cool...I think. 120bpm is fine...

this is also going to force me to make sure the tymp is cleared!! We haven't used them all fall b/c of COVID...that will be a project of it's own...my OCD won't let me do just one, so all 4 will get the once over as well
 

pgm554

Platinum Member
Pretty much all of the above.
Orchestral stuff for ghost notes and delicate playing.
Drum corp and rudimemtal for set playing as parididdles and ratamacues don't see much use in classical styles.
Conductors don't care much about sticking,only the correct sound and rhythm.
 
Last edited:

toddbishop

Platinum Member
Yea I think I agree with you about the rudimental book. I actually already went through the Mitchell peters books with a teacher (except for the advanced book). I just assumed that the advanced peters book and portraits in rhythm were around the same level. Am I wrong?
Advanced SD Studies is a similar level but I like it better. PIR is denser and seems to be largely about creating reading problems. I rarely practice either of them-- I mostly practice out of Peters's intermediate book-- for my purposes it's one of the best books for real world functional snare drum technique.

I also use Peters's Odd Time Calisthenics and Odd Meter Rudimental Etudes a lot. His stuff doesn't get talked about enough.
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
Advanced SD Studies is a similar level but I like it better. PIR is denser and seems to be largely about creating reading problems. I rarely practice either of them-- I mostly practice out of Peters's intermediate book-- for my purposes it's one of the best books for real world functional snare drum technique.

I also use Peters's Odd Time Calisthenics and Odd Meter Rudimental Etudes a lot. His stuff doesn't get talked about enough.
He played in the Dallas Symphony back in the 60s with my timpani teacher. That really surprised me when I found out, because to most school band percussion kids, he’s just the “Yellow After the Rain” guy
 

Old PIT Guy

Well-known member
It depends on what you want to do, accomplish, or if you've bothered to define a direction. If you haven't done that then nothing should be off the table because as has been already written it's all valuable. If you have a road you want to go down, then I'd concentrate on what works to whatever that direction is. If you contextualize the amount of time most of us waste, any purposeful direction, even if it's short-lived, is a good road to travel.
 

Joffry

Active member
It depends on what you want to do, accomplish, or if you've bothered to define a direction. If you haven't done that then nothing should be off the table because as has been already written it's all valuable. If you have a road you want to go down, then I'd concentrate on what works to whatever that direction is. If you contextualize the amount of time most of us waste, any purposeful direction, even if it's short-lived, is a good road to travel.
I guess I just want to increase my overall facility on the drumset and have a larger vocabulary of rhythms to use during solos rather than just repeating the same linear triplet and sixteenth note licks. I was thinking that delving into a certain style of snare drumming (either concert or marching) would help me build this facility while simultaneously improving creativity. Again, my ultimate goal is to improve facility on the drums; Im not planning on playing with a drum line or anything. Practicing marching/concert snare would just be a small part of my practice pad routine.
 
Top