What ultimately made you decide on the brand of drums you play?

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
But I gotta say I really dig Yamaha at this point and it’d need to be a sweet kit/deal to lure me away. Great Hardware, great finshes, solid builds, good sound and generally a bit cheaper too.
As a general rule of thumb, the answer is Yamaha when you dont know. Meaning, Yamaha makes quality gear. If you need a piece of equipment and know nothing about it, Yamaha is usually a safe bet.
 

jimb

Member
In the past I bought purely on style/finish and drum sizes. My thinking is that heads and tuning matter much more than the drum itself when it comes to sound. That said I’ve always loved the idea of owning an American made kit. My current kit is a Sonor made in Taiwan. It’s a great sounding little kit but it’s not well made and I’m a “buy local” kind of guy I guess.
I don't have any experience with drums as I've only just started and I play cheap Mapex Tornadoes which I've tuned and changed the heads on.
No-one has said their no good and even tho I'm not a hard hitter I often get asked to keep the volume down....so in my book that makes them good I guess.
 

yammyfan

Senior Member
I don't have any experience with drums as I've only just started and I play cheap Mapex Tornadoes which I've tuned and changed the heads on.
No-one has said their no good and even tho I'm not a hard hitter I often get asked to keep the volume down....so in my book that makes them good I guess.
The Tornadoes are fine as starter kits, as you've discovered. They wouldn't stand up well to the rigors of gigging - the included hardware especially, but they're decent starter kits. They cymbals are worthless, however.

Enjoy them for a year or two but think about the future if you really enjoy drumming. There's no shortage of excellent intermediate kits on the market, the Stage Custom being one of the finest examples. It's a great time to be a drummer.
 

jimb

Member
The Tornadoes are fine as starter kits, as you've discovered. They wouldn't stand up well to the rigors of gigging - the included hardware especially, but they're decent starter kits. They cymbals are worthless, however.

Enjoy them for a year or two but think about the future if you really enjoy drumming. There's no shortage of excellent intermediate kits on the market, the Stage Custom being one of the finest examples. It's a great time to be a drummer.
No doubt and I forgot to mention I got them as a weird shell pack deal so I have Yammie 600 hardware and good cymbals...I dont really play much and our rehearsal space has a lovely Pearl kit so they'll do for now I guess. The other poster was right I think about heads and tuning tho...
 

yammyfan

Senior Member
No doubt and I forgot to mention I got them as a weird shell pack deal so I have Yammie 600 hardware and good cymbals...I dont really play much and our rehearsal space has a lovely Pearl kit so they'll do for now I guess. The other poster was right I think about heads and tuning tho...
You're all set then.

I bought a second-hand set of Tornadoes last year to leave at rehearsal spaces instead of one of my more expensive kits. They sounded good with upgraded heads and proper cymbals. You can definitely do a lot with them.
 

cornelius

Silver Member
I decided on DW about 20 years ago. I had been aware of them for a long time, but I always thought they were too expensive, and in the 90's I liked working with the smaller, boutique guys. I had my old 70's Sligerlands and a new little custom kit, but there was just something missing from those drums. I had a gig at La Bar Bat, in NYC and they had a DW house kit. It was a little beat up, but they sounded amazing. They were really easy to tune up, even with the old heads. I did some looking around on 48th St, and realized that if you don't go for the lacquer finish, the prices were the same as my boutique drums. So I sold the custom kit and have always stuck with DW.

After a couple of years owning DWs, I got to know Billy Ward while we worked on some of his videos, and ultimately got to know John Good. There are a lot of great drum companies out there, but I'm happy to stick with DW. They've made things really easy for me, live and in the studio.
 

Justinhub2003

Well-known member
My dream since starting to play was to own a high end Ludwig kit. So after years of owning kits from pearl, Tama, PDP and DW, I pulled the trigger a few months ago.

I built my dream kit. I’m over pearl, Tama, DW etc.

It’s either Ludwig or a beautiful Sonor kit.
 

Hewitt2

Senior Member
An important recognition, one often overlooked by today's up-and-coming drummers. They don't realize that a lot of the midrange gear on today's market is just as good as, and sometimes better than, the elite equipment of yesteryear. Major strides in production have had a transformational impact on manufacturers' capacities to offer first-rate products at reasonable prices. There's really no need to drop five grand on a drum set these days. You can get a great kit at a fraction of that sum.
Its interesting that cymbals haven’t had the same downward trajectory in price. Why is that?
 

Griffin

Well-known member
Its interesting that cymbals haven’t had the same downward trajectory in price. Why is that?
I‘m assuming because they still involve a large degree of manufacture by hand. Also metal prices stay high. Thus no downward trajectory for manufacturing costs. I’m just guessing though.

Also I think in the budget to intermediate lines there’s been a huge improvement in bang for your buck even since I started playing. Not to mention brands like Istanbul, Zultan, Wuhan and Dream offering lower price points.
 
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dmacc_2

Well-known member
Most important to me is sound, feel and ease of hardware mounting. So for me after trying almost every major brand at some point over the last 40+years - and even some boutique stuff - I know what feels like 'home' to me.

What's not important to me mostly popularity. High priced boutique stuff doesn't suit / interest me either.

Ultimately it's a long, long learning process and over time your ideas and opinions may change as you do.
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
Its interesting that cymbals haven’t had the same downward trajectory in price. Why is that?
As @Griffin mentions, the manufacturing of cymbals remains quite labor intensive. Though some lines, owing to technological advances, are produced with greater efficiency in our era, traditional casting and so forth takes a lot of time and costs a lot of money. Inflation keeps prices high in turn.
 
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