What is your workhorse snare from your collection?

Stroker

Platinum Member
I have one of these which I treasure. For the first few months I was actually underwhelmed, and even disappointed. I tried all kinds of tunings and batter heads, yet I couldn't get this drum to sing. Sounded choked all the time. Then I finally replaced the stock reso head and the skies opened and a rainbow appeared. This turned into one of the most extraordinary drums I've ever heard. Totally understand your choice. If it weren't so heavy, it might be my workhouse choice.
A pleasure hearing from you, Steady!

May I ask what reso head you settled on?

As for all that you relayed, I'm behind you 100%! It really is an extraordinary drum all the way around, and as for it's weight, heavy is right, it could easily serve as an anchor! (y)

Really great chatting with you, Sir!
 

Pass.of.E.r.a.

Gold Member
I have one of these which I treasure. For the first few months I was actually underwhelmed, and even disappointed. I tried all kinds of tunings and batter heads, yet I couldn't get this drum to sing. Sounded choked all the time. Then I finally replaced the stock reso head and the skies opened and a rainbow appeared. This turned into one of the most extraordinary drums I've ever heard. Totally understand your choice. If it weren't so heavy, it might be my workhouse choice.
That's quite surprising to me... with the amount you no doubt paid for it, plus it being a top-level Sonor snare, you'd figure it'd have heads that compliment it right out of the box. Glad you made it work for you though!

-Jonathn
 
Quoting myself from a different thread: https://drummerworld.com/forums/index.php?threads/the-good-snare-thread.2222/page-54

Tama SLP Classic Maple 14x5
Tama Artstar ES Brass 14x6.5 (I think)
Yamaha Vintage Series Maple 14x6
The two Tamas are what I'd take to gigs with shared equipment as they are reliable and work smoothly. The Artstar snare is really great and sturdy. The Yamaha stays at home because it's a bit less sturdy and I couldn't replace it easily - when it's tuned well, it's probably my favorite, though.
 

Vintage Old School

Gold Member
Too hard of a decision for me because I like all of my snares for each and every aspect of their differences, nuances and quirks. My snares are like my daughters: I don't love any particular one of them more, I've just loved some of them longer.

But taking the definition of workhorse in the strictest sense, I give my nod to the Beier 1.5 4" X 15" snare drum. Affordable. Dependable. Utilitarian.
Roadworthy. Always sounds great. You just can't go wrong with any of the Beier snares.
 

Attachments

Bonzo_CR

Silver Member
Mine is the Tama SLP Dry Aluminium.
Versatile sound, nicely built, great value.
(Actually, since I put a coated Emperor on it the other week, it sounds just like my Supra...)
TamaSLPAluminium14x5_5_1_small.jpg
 

incrementalg

Gold Member
My workhorse snare is an Oriollo Phantom 6.5x14. The thing never leaves the stand at this point. I would like to snag an older COB supraphonic as a workhorse though. Had one in the 80s that had something special, but had to part with it a long time ago.
 

Pass.of.E.r.a.

Gold Member
My C&C maple snare seems to handle 90% of my metal band's gigs (when I can use my own drum), but for everything else I do it's either my 6.5" Supra or my Benny Greb sig. Both are SUPER versatile and sit comfortably in any situation I throw them in.

Guess I can't narrow it down from 3. Plus now that I have this new to me 5" Supra that's undoubtedly going to muddy the waters haha.

-Jonathan
 
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Mr Farkle

Well-known member
14x5 Supralite. A $200 drum. Sounds amazing, to my ears. Sometimes I think I’m tired of it so I switch to my Acrolite but that only lasts maybe a day before the Supra comes out again. The only other snares I own are an old 60’s Japanese mystery snare and the snare the came with my Sonor Bop. The Bop snare is my least favorite.
 
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cdrums21

Gold Member
I've had many different snares over the years, had a nice collection at one time for some studio work, but now I have whittled it down to two that I use mostly since I'm not recording much these days. I prefer the sound of metal snares, so I use a 1976 Ludwig 402 which sounds great most of the time, or an early 2000's Black beauty, 6.5 x 14. I can get a pretty good range of sounds out of those two drums for what I do.
 

Hewitt2

Senior Member
5.5 x 14 Slingerland Artist single ply maple from early 60s.

Killer on funk and groove oriented music. Rim shots to die for.
 

steadypocket

Gold Member
A pleasure hearing from you, Steady!

May I ask what reso head you settled on?

As for all that you relayed, I'm behind you 100%! It really is an extraordinary drum all the way around, and as for it's weight, heavy is right, it could easily serve as an anchor! (y)

Really great chatting with you, Sir!
So I ended up with my go to, the Evans Hazy 300. The “medium resonance”stock head is supposed to be a Remo Ambassador snare side head. Ordinarily that should be be fine, but all I know is that swapping out the head made all the difference in the world. I then swapped out the reso heads for two other SQ2s I picked up last year. All improved sonically to some degree, but none as dramatically as the cast bronze. Perhaps I just had a bum head. Quality control may be lower for the Remo stock heads.
 

Stroker

Platinum Member
So I ended up with my go to, the Evans Hazy 300. The “medium resonance”stock head is supposed to be a Remo Ambassador snare side head. Ordinarily that should be be fine, but all I know is that swapping out the head made all the difference in the world. I then swapped out the reso heads for two other SQ2s I picked up last year. All improved sonically to some degree, but none as dramatically as the cast bronze. Perhaps I just had a bum head. Quality control may be lower for the Remo stock heads.
Many thanks, Steady!

Drum heads are not my forte, so being being able to rely on fellow members as yourself for guidance is a real plus.

Speaking of the cast-bronze, 10th Anniversary SQ2's you and I own, I still haven't applied my custom badge, account no rubber washers or protective rubber mounting pad for the inside of the drum shell. I'm anal when it comes to stuff like that.

Over and above seeking out the expertise of a gentleman I know who owns and operates a custom shop that fabricates CNC auto parts to turn me out something that fits the bill, what did you use as a buffer between the finished cast shell of your drum and the nuts when applying your badge?
 

bananers

Junior Member
I only own one snare at the moment but it's done well for me gigs and recording wise. I got this Yamaha Maple Custom from an old teacher yeeeears ago for £150 and what a steal. Perfect amount of crack, unbelievably beautiful cross-stick sound and lovely for brushwork too!

The die-cast hoops have seen better days but luckily the sound is still wicked and I suppose it's part of what makes this a workhorse 🤔 Size is 14x4.5"20200402_112713-min-min.jpg
 
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