What is YOUR strongest quality or skill-set on the kit?

Benthedrummer

Junior Member
What's funny is that I agree with him. Have you ever listened to the recordings he did of the exercises out of his own book? Any one that involves bass drum work, he can't quite play it. Definitely made me chuckle, the author couldn't even play his own exercises. And it wasn't even *that* hard footwork, at least in a modern context. Damn good player though otherwise.
I have never actually heard any of his playing at all.
 

tfgretsch

Junior Member
Forgot to mention ,never paid enough attention to LEARNING HOW TO LISTEN, years ago, Always focusing on trying to get faster,greater chops ! .In my later years i am playing better Musically,Phisically&Mentally ,because i am listening better than i ever have. getting inside the song ,see what i need to be playing, and practice it. seems to be paying off. ps also started to make charts to songs i am having trouble with and that also helps alot. Thanks Ben great thread !!
 

Woolwich

Silver Member
I can tune my drums quite well. Actually let's qualify that a bit better, I take enough care and can tune my drums well enough compared to most of the drummers (numbskulls?) that our regular PA guy works with. On several occasions over the last few years he's said that he enjoys working with me because he can just slap mics on my kit and it works with very little tweaking. The fact I'm not precious about my sound so am happy to throw control rings on my toms to make life easier for him and for the show to go on probably helps too. That being said I am precious about my bass drum, a hole will not be getting cut in it.
My biggest downfall is my most noticeable characteristic. As a self taught drummer no one's ever told me the correct way to hit a drum and as a result another sound man (there seems to be a pattern developing) who is also a drum teacher explained to me that I play "through" the drum. Basically I hit the snare like it owes me money. While this could make mixing me a bit of a problem, in reality it works in relation to the amplified bands I'm in and means that whatever snare drum I'm using, my band mates refer to it as the worlds loudest snare. It also means that I very much have my "own sound".
 

Stroman

Platinum Member
I'd say my strength is listening and locking in with a good feel.

I've been told this in some fairly interesting ways. One bass player said, "Man, you have HUGE ears!" It was an open jam and we'd never played together before, and he was doing this really cool improv rap/funk thing, and we just totally locked in. He was a great player, and we hit all the changes together, even though we were making it up as we went.

At the other end of the spectrum, I worked as a sub for an older country musician, and at the end of the gig he said, "I'm gonna give you the best compliment I can give a drummer - I didn't even know you were there." Trust me, it's not that I was playing exceptionally quietly, it's just that I was playing what fit and he never had to think about it.
 

Benthedrummer

Junior Member
I can tune my drums quite well. Actually let's qualify that a bit better, I take enough care and can tune my drums well enough compared to most of the drummers (numbskulls?) that our regular PA guy works with. On several occasions over the last few years he's said that he enjoys working with me because he can just slap mics on my kit and it works with very little tweaking. The fact I'm not precious about my sound so am happy to throw control rings on my toms to make life easier for him and for the show to go on probably helps too. That being said I am precious about my bass drum, a hole will not be getting cut in it.
My biggest downfall is my most noticeable characteristic. As a self taught drummer no one's ever told me the correct way to hit a drum and as a result another sound man (there seems to be a pattern developing) who is also a drum teacher explained to me that I play "through" the drum. Basically I hit the snare like it owes me money. While this could make mixing me a bit of a problem, in reality it works in relation to the amplified bands I'm in and means that whatever snare drum I'm using, my band mates refer to it as the worlds loudest snare. It also means that I very much have my "own sound".
Now that right there is I think the penultimate situation for a sound engineer.

A drummer who has a good ear and can mic up a kit and be done.

A great skill-set Wooly, I'm waaaaaay behind you on that.
 

Benthedrummer

Junior Member
I'd say my strength is listening and locking in with a good feel.

I've been told this in some fairly interesting ways. One bass player said, "Man, you have HUGE ears!" It was an open jam and we'd never played together before, and he was doing this really cool improv rap/funk thing, and we just totally locked in. He was a great player, and we hit all the changes together, even though we were making it up as we went.

At the other end of the spectrum, I worked as a sub for an older country musician, and at the end of the gig he said, "I'm gonna give you the best compliment I can give a drummer - I didn't even know you were there." Trust me, it's not that I was playing exceptionally quietly, it's just that I was playing what fit and he never had to think about it.
Not knowing you were there for a gig will no doubt keep you in work with that country musician for a long time yet.
 

Benthedrummer

Junior Member
Forgot to mention ,never paid enough attention to LEARNING HOW TO LISTEN, years ago, Always focusing on trying to get faster,greater chops ! .In my later years i am playing better Musically,Phisically&Mentally ,because i am listening better than i ever have. getting inside the song ,see what i need to be playing, and practice it. seems to be paying off. ps also started to make charts to songs i am having trouble with and that also helps alot. Thanks Ben great thread !!
Sounds like you were born to play the drums 😉
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
I can find instantly find the beat in the most complex, dense musical texture and lock in on it like a laser. That’s mostly an inborn skill, although playing for many years certainly helped me too.

I can also instantly adjust to other people’s bad time, which is a learned skill from playing in orchestras, all of which had terrible time.
 

Benthedrummer

Junior Member
I can find instantly find the beat in the most complex, dense musical texture and lock in on it like a laser. That’s mostly an inborn skill, although playing for many years certainly helped me too.

I can also instantly adjust to other people’s bad time, which is a learned skill from playing in orchestras, all of which had terrible time.
You are kidding me!

Finding the groove in any complex musical situation is truly an incredible skill to have.

Other musos' must totally love playing with you.
 

Morrisman

Platinum Member
There are plenty of drummers better than me around town, but this year (up until March) I’ve done paid gigs with seven different bands, mostly filling for other drummers who were unavailable. Had to learn a lot of new songs with zero or one rehearsal. So I guess I have an ability to learn new material, listen and adapt. I’m also always early, bring spare gear like mics and leads, dress well and try and be positive with everyone I meet. Makes up for the average drumming - people hire me because they like my attitude.

The other thing I get compliments on is the ability to make a house drum kit sound good. Not just tuning, but coaxing good, balanced sounds from the drums. I get compliments from sound engineers and even bar staff who hear their house kit all the time. I must admit I’m never completely happy with the sound, but maybe that’s the key - listening and striving for better.
 

Benthedrummer

Junior Member
There are plenty of drummers better than me around town, but this year (up until March) I’ve done paid gigs with seven different bands, mostly filling for other drummers who were unavailable. Had to learn a lot of new songs with zero or one rehearsal. So I guess I have an ability to learn new material, listen and adapt. I’m also always early, bring spare gear like mics and leads, dress well and try and be positive with everyone I meet. Makes up for the average drumming - people hire me because they like my attitude.

The other thing I get compliments on is the ability to make a house drum kit sound good. Not just tuning, but coaxing good, balanced sounds from the drums. I get compliments from sound engineers and even bar staff who hear their house kit all the time. I must admit I’m never completely happy with the sound, but maybe that’s the key - listening and striving for better.
You have an outstanding work ethic.

And you never rest on your laurels.
 

Stroman

Platinum Member
Not knowing you were there for a gig will no doubt keep you in work with that country musician for a long time yet.
It's funny - I've actually had other drummers tell me that comment would have made them mad or upset them. Not me. It was genuine, not meant ironically, and I knew exactly what he meant.
 

Benthedrummer

Junior Member
It's funny - I've actually had other drummers tell me that comment would have made them mad or upset them. Not me. It was genuine, not meant ironically, and I knew exactly what he meant.
In view of the fact that that comment didn't offend you or make you mad kinda indicates that you are in the game for the right reasons, in terms of forging an actual potential career as a drummer.

I can completely understand how a comment like that could offend or upset some drummers.

There are those players who want to be noticed for their playing from a technical prowess perspective.

Since I started this thread, I can get a good insight into what REAL drummers have worked on over the years and what they consider to be the most important part of their drumming.

I have got a lot of homework to do.
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
You are a studio engineer's dream.
well, from my youngest days in middle school band, I was always told that things had to be perfect. That is why you did band (or football, or Boy Scouts etc)...because it was an activity that had requirements, and one of those was to play perfect. I was taught that it was disrespectful to the other participants to not do your part. It was a waste of their time.

My first studio experience was my sophomore year in HS, and it changed my life. It was awesome...and scary, and frustrating etc. Luckily, the engineer was our drummers (I played bass in that band), teacher. He taught us a TON about the studio experience. That fall, we started being a guinea pig band at The Recording Workshop in Chillicothe Ohio. That also exposed us to tons of experience. I wanted to be the guys who were always nailing it on the first take. There is a certain kind of "energy" that that pressure gives me.


Don't say luck either........you created your own luck with discipline.
this...is quite possibly the best thing I have ever seen. This completely defines one of my big view points on life. I am stealing this as a quote for ther band room. Royalties will be sent....
 

NouveauCliche

Senior Member
Feel but with professionalism being a close second. I can always make a song feel good and other musicians feel supported.

My weak spot is the super linear inspired playing and "chops" that covers all things Instagram these days.
 

Benthedrummer

Junior Member
The CD that comes with Advanced Techniques for the Modern Drummer has him playing all the exercises.
Word?

Hang on a sec here........I've flipped though several of these books at a few drum shops here, I've never noticed any sound supplement with them.

What am I missing here frogster?
 
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