What Is Your Favorite Drum Sound?

I'll always respect Henley for his pivotal role in preserving Walden Pond, where nineteenth-century transcendental writer Henry David Thoreau resided in a cabin before penning Walden, his masterwork. There were plans at one point to scar the setting with a crass condo development, but Henley led a successful resistance against the plot. I'm not an activist by any stretch of the imagination, but I commend his efforts to protect a precious landmark of American literary history.
I used to have a signed copy of Heaven Is Under Our Feet, I think my sister has it now? I think he was also an early supporter of the Sierra Club, back when they were just buying up land, before they got political. I share your appreciation for nature and American history and literature.
 
I mean, all the members of the band who weren't Henley or Frey seemed to accomplish it. And while, sure, you can say none of the others were the obvious leaders of the band, the way Frey and Henley were, I'd argue Joe Walsh is as famous as Henley and more famous than Frey and even being a relative newcomer to the band (having only been in the band for 46 years, rather than 49), he was also already quite well known before joining, and brought the hard rock cred for which Frey and Henley were so desperate.

Also, depending upon which source, the Eagles could actually be as high as the 2nd best-selling band of all time, or as "low" as the 6th; given record label skullduggery, we're never really going to know how many copies Elvis or the Beatles sold, never mind Motown or various blues and soul and R&B acts. But 3rd seems about right to me and in any case, puts them in company with the likes of Led Zeppelin and Pink Floyd and U2—heavy commercial hitters indeed.
Fair points. I guess I should clarify: "Lead singer and co-writer for what is probably the 3rd-best selling band of all time."

I think Frey was probably more arrogant than Henley is, difference being that he was friendly and garrulous, while Henley is cold and aloof. You're right about Joe Walsh, though, he's a very humble and kind man, and funny! Not as famous as Henley is now, by a long shot, but back in the 70s? Yeah, definitely more famous than any one person in the Eagles.
 
For backbeat music I love the sounds of Matt Chamberlain (Fiona Apple and the Miranda Lambert Weight of these Wings sounds) and Jim Keltner on the Lucinda stuff. Glenn Kotche gets some amazing sounds on the Wilco records. Jay Bellerose.

For jazz, I love Antonio Sanchez' sound. Brian Blade, who's also gotten some amazing rock sounds. Hutch. Ulysses Owens. Joey Baron on the Frisell Trio records, for sure. Of course I love Tony and Elvin and Roy, but who doesn't? :D
Finally...a fellow jazzer. I love Max Roach's tunings when he had the band with Clifford Brown. Art Blakey, of course. Mitch Mitchell on Electric Ladyland. Early Tony Williams, as on "Seven Steps to Heaven." Ginger Baker, yeah. Elvin's drums after his wife Keiko tuned them. Garibaldi's old Slingerlands from the album with What is hip on it. Zigaboo. Jay Belerrose has got his own thing entirely.
 
He was always very nice to me, and generous to a fault. But damned near everyone else I know who knew him has at least one horror story to tell, so yeah.

His drumming, though...it just sends me. I really am obsessed with it at this point, I guess.
 
But, 3rd best-selling band of all time? How does one avoid being pompous in that situation?
Anyways, his playing is so thoughtful and he really uses the drums to put the other instruments and the vocal up front. I'd like to master that, myself.
How does one avoid? By simply not being pompous. Its a choice.
I also admire his playing and choices, but the drums on the whole are poorly recorded on many Eagles albums. That isolated track posted in this thread is a great example. They improved eventually. The drums on a song like Get Over It sound like drums.
 
This is an impossible question for me. My tastes change weekly. Like trying to hit a moving target that's on the back of another moving target.
 
How does one avoid? By simply not being pompous. Its a choice.
I also admire his playing and choices, but the drums on the whole are poorly recorded on many Eagles albums. That isolated track posted in this thread is a great example. They improved eventually. The drums on a song like Get Over It sound like drums.
Glyn Johns and Bill Szymczyk recorded the drums poorly? Ok, that's a new one, never heard that before. I know many current players don't like the sounds of that era.
 
Mike Portnoy on Falling into infinity album and Nicko Mc Brain on the X Factor album. Very cutting and lively. Open and clear with bright cymbal. Not over processed. To me unparalleled drums tracks.
 
Glyn Johns and Bill Szymczyk recorded the drums poorly? Ok, that's a new one, never heard that before. I know many current players don't like the sounds of that era.
Not Glyn. If you read Glyn Johns book, he and Henley got into it about the drum sounds, and Henley hated not having a mic on each drum (Henley even mentions this in an Eagles documentary). Thus they parted ways, and Johns recorded hardly any Eagles after 0.5 an album. The Eagles got their way ....and recorded muted muffled drums for their road to success. Nothing bad about it, it worked for them, but don't attribute their muffled drum sounds to Glyn Johns, who obviously records drums supremely.
 
Not Glyn. If you read Glyn Johns book, he and Henley got into it about the drum sounds, and Henley hated not having a mic on each drum (Henley even mentions this in an Eagles documentary). Thus they parted ways, and Johns recorded hardly any Eagles after 0.5 an album. The Eagles got their way ....and recorded muted muffled drums for their road to success. Nothing bad about it, it worked for them, but don't attribute their muffled drum sounds to Glyn Johns, who obviously records drums supremely.
Glyn Johns produced "Eagles" and "Desperado" and part of "On the Border", at which point the Eagles went with Bill Szymcyk, who also used Glyn's approach to mic'ing the drums.

From an interview with Bill (Sound on Sound magazine): "Eagles records were a benchmark for drum sounds in their time. Bill Szymczyk says he and Henley invested a lot of time experimenting with microphone choices and placements, but that most of the time they reverted to fairly common configurations. "There was a lot of flavour-of-the-week with microphones back then," he says. "But it would usually come back to a Shure 57 on the top of the snare, either U67 or 87s as overheads, sometimes AKG 414s. It was the usual stuff, and always on just four tracks. One of the reasons the drums sounded good was because they were a kit, not a whole bunch of separate tracks."
 
Glyn Johns produced "Eagles" and "Desperado" and part of "On the Border", at which point the Eagles went with Bill Szymcyk, who also used Glyn's approach to mic'ing the drums.

From an interview with Bill (Sound on Sound magazine): "Eagles records were a benchmark for drum sounds in their time. Bill Szymczyk says he and Henley invested a lot of time experimenting with microphone choices and placements, but that most of the time they reverted to fairly common configurations. "There was a lot of flavour-of-the-week with microphones back then," he says. "But it would usually come back to a Shure 57 on the top of the snare, either U67 or 87s as overheads, sometimes AKG 414s. It was the usual stuff, and always on just four tracks. One of the reasons the drums sounded good was because they were a kit, not a whole bunch of separate tracks."

Yes you are right. I did not know he did the entire first two .... but I bet their drums sound better. lol
The isolated track earlier in this thread of Hotel California is a great example of Henley's drum sounds, and they are just really dead to me.
 
Glyn Johns produced "Eagles" and "Desperado" and part of "On the Border", at which point the Eagles went with Bill Szymcyk, who also used Glyn's approach to mic'ing the drums.

From an interview with Bill (Sound on Sound magazine): "Eagles records were a benchmark for drum sounds in their time. Bill Szymczyk says he and Henley invested a lot of time experimenting with microphone choices and placements, but that most of the time they reverted to fairly common configurations. "There was a lot of flavour-of-the-week with microphones back then," he says. "But it would usually come back to a Shure 57 on the top of the snare, either U67 or 87s as overheads, sometimes AKG 414s. It was the usual stuff, and always on just four tracks. One of the reasons the drums sounded good was because they were a kit, not a whole bunch of separate tracks."

Yes you are right. I did not know he did the entire first two .... but I bet their drums sound better. lol
The isolated track earlier in this thread is a great example of Henley's drum sounds, and they are just really dead to me.
 
The drum sounds are just as dead on the two and half albums Johns worked on. It was a conscious decision to get that sound because it worked for the music.
 
Yes you are right. I did not know he did the entire first two .... but I bet their drums sound better. lol
The isolated track earlier in this thread is a great example of Henley's drum sounds, and they are just really dead to me.
I'm not sure those isolated tracks are actually Henley's playing, but even if they are, they've been EQ'd to death in order to remove the rest of the parts.

That said, "dead" isn't a terrible description of Henley's drum sound. I get it. To me, it's a dry "thump", with very little ring/sustain, except on what I presume are timbales in some Eagles songs (Hotel California being a prime example...). I like that, and it's not just Henley who exploited that sound. Mr. Johns and Mr. Szymczyk used that approach to capture the playing of lots of drummers in the 70s.

I'm not even interested in playing music that orbits what the Eagles did; I'm much more into Little Feat and the Meters and more generally, Blues and R&B. But, I absolutely love that sound, and if I remember correctly, we both appreciate the choices he made behind the kit to support the songs he was playing.

Anyways, here's a Glyn Johns/Eagles track for reference. I really like the song itself, but it's the same approach and same dry sounds as Szymczyk used later on. Drums in the background, guitars in the midground, vocals up front.

 
Natural sound: Keith Moon 'Quadrophenia', Phil Collins 'Abacab'
Close sound: Roger Taylor 'Sheer Heart Attack', Bill Bruford 'Fragile'
Totally electronic sound: Bill Bruford 'Three Of A Perfect Pair', Roger Taylor 'The Works', Bertie the Bisexual Drum Machine 'Abacab'
 
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