What is "Worship Music"?

Vertical worship??? I'm sure that I've read that term in an article about phallic architecture before. I hope that they don't attract the wrong crowd with that name. :whistle:
I guess I'll stick with this - Bach had some serious chops:
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
That's easy. They go anywhere and everywhere.
I swear if I had an EAD10 or audio/video recording gear I would start a thread called Heathen Chops and play double kick, blast beats, and giant fills all over normal music just because I can. That is the point, right?

I'm finding irony in the Worship Packs of cymbals. Darker sounding cymbals, eh? If they were marketed as "darker" would churches be less likely to buy them for fear of unholy intervention?
 
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GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
Didn't the genre evolve from African-American music grads and promising drummers shedding chops in battles-like Eric Moore, Thomas Pridgeon and the like so a lot of different influences from their education jumps out in the fusion. I think Dennis Chambers chops also influenced it and I think all those sheds became adopted into gospel music. Or it could be the other way around and they followed. You see the gospel chop fills all over the place now-so you can't deny they sound awesome.
 

cbphoto

Gold Member
So 'gospel chops' came about in black inner-city churches, and its claim to fame is extremely busy fills. I get that. I guess what I'm asking is how does playing all over the song become a thing that someone aspires to? And Twinkies.
My hunch is: suburb churches wanna get done within an hour. People got things to do. Inner city churches wanna hang and worship for a few hours. That's what's gotta get done. So, whatcha gonna do? Play the money beat for an hour and not get into it? Or, are you gonna take the lead from the music director and actually worship with your instrument, Miriam-style.

Please pass the Twinkies. And that coffee.
 

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
Where I live..
Around here the website it's cooler!

Gotcha. Most churches around here struggle finding drummers, and our church has like 4 of them (actually, 3 drummers b/c I'm on an extended break). It can be difficult to find worship musicians because it's a whole lotta work for either little or no pay. All of our praise team are volunteers except for the sound guy (who's in charge of a lot more stuff) and our worship pastor. I think it's really cool when churches pay their musicians, but I haven't seen much of that in 20+ years.
 

Mr Farkle

Well-known member
Gotcha. Most churches around here struggle finding drummers, and our church has like 4 of them (actually, 3 drummers b/c I'm on an extended break). It can be difficult to find worship musicians because it's a whole lotta work for either little or no pay. All of our praise team are volunteers except for the sound guy (who's in charge of a lot more stuff) and our worship pastor. I think it's really cool when churches pay their musicians, but I haven't seen much of that in 20+ years.

I attended a church in San Francisco (yes, they exist) that hired local jazz musicians and payed them. One is very well known and it’s still his Sunday gig. The church saw it as supporting artists (traditionally, the poor), Christian outreach and as a way to have consistent high quality music. It was successful on all levels.

I never understood why a church would not hesitate to pay a plumber and then expect high quality worship arts for free. Makes no sense to me.
 

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
I never understood why a church would not hesitate to pay a plumber and then expect high quality worship arts for free. Makes no sense to me.

I think around here, people put church musicians in the same category as people who help serve food, volunteer at a bake sale or car wash, or teach a Bible study. This comes from the mindset that no one person's ministry is more important than the other...which I agree with; however, there is a certain level of time commitment that takes place when serving on the worship team that would be nice to be compensated for at times. Talking about money in church is sort of taboo in these parts (outside of a quarterly business meeting).
 

J-W

Well-known member
I never understood why a church would not hesitate to pay a plumber and then expect high quality worship arts for free. Makes no sense to me.

But it makes cents to them.
I think some churches take the viewpoint of; If you're part of the worship band, then you are a part of the congregation therefore you are obligated to donate your time to the church. I don't think they pay the choir.

That said, I think there was a thread on here where it was mentioned that someone had a paid church gig and they weren't a member of the congregation or even religious.
 

Mr Farkle

Well-known member
I think around here, people put church musicians in the same category as people who help serve food, volunteer at a bake sale or car wash, or teach a Bible study. This comes from the mindset that no one person's ministry is more important than the other...which I agree with; however, there is a certain level of time commitment that takes place when serving on the worship team that would be nice to be compensated for at times. Talking about money in church is sort of taboo in these parts (outside of a quarterly business meeting).

I think some churches take the viewpoint of; If you're part of the worship band, then you are a part of the congregation therefore you are obligated to donate your time to the church. I don't think they pay the choir.

It’s definitely a more nuanced conversation than my “Why don’t they pay?” question but I do like to discuss it when the opportunity arises. I sense that the arts are unequally devalued (literally) in churches, at least in the United States.
 

DrumDoug

Senior Member
While technically any music you worship to is worship music, “Worship Music” is a style of music has evolved over the last 20 years or so. It’s different than gospel and is played in mostly white churches. It started with Hillsong and has moved on to Bethel, Jesus Culture, Elevation, and so on. I’m trying to describe it without being negative, but it’s hard because I can’t stand it. To my ears it doesn’t really have a groove or melody. It’s about creating soundscapes. One local mega church calls them “soaker songs”. You are supposed to stand there and sway back and forth and soak up the Holy Spirit. They are usually slow and in the 60 something bpm range. The singer sort of talk sings over the sounds the band makes. There are a lot of sustaining synth pads, while the guitar players just noodle around with lots of effects. The drums are mostly cymbal swells and tom fills. It rarely settles into a traditional kick/snare/hat groove. Like I said, it more of a soundscape. “Worship” cymbal packs are usually larger darker cymbals. 18” hats, 22” crashes, 26” rides are common. I don’t think the Zildjian one has sizes that big, but they are larger and thin. The cymbals help make the wall of sounds more than punctuate accents. We had a well know worship leader come to our church back in 2019 before the shutdowns. We played 5 songs, the opener was 68bpm, the next four were all run together at 62bpm. I had to make notes because all of the songs were so similar that I couldn’t keep track of which was which. They were all just cymbal swells and slight variations of tribal type tom grooves.
 

Mr Farkle

Well-known member
While technically any music you worship to is worship music, “Worship Music” is a style of music has evolved over the last 20 years or so. It’s different than gospel and is played in mostly white churches. It started with Hillsong and has moved on to Bethel, Jesus Culture, Elevation, and so on. I’m trying to describe it without being negative, but it’s hard because I can’t stand it. To my ears it doesn’t really have a groove or melody. It’s about creating soundscapes. One local mega church calls them “soaker songs”. You are supposed to stand there and sway back and forth and soak up the Holy Spirit. They are usually slow and in the 60 something bpm range. The singer sort of talk sings over the sounds the band makes. There are a lot of sustaining synth pads, while the guitar players just noodle around with lots of effects. The drums are mostly cymbal swells and tom fills. It rarely settles into a traditional kick/snare/hat groove. Like I said, it more of a soundscape. “Worship” cymbal packs are usually larger darker cymbals. 18” hats, 22” crashes, 26” rides are common. I don’t think the Zildjian one has sizes that big, but they are larger and thin. The cymbals help make the wall of sounds more than punctuate accents. We had a well know worship leader come to our church back in 2019 before the shutdowns. We played 5 songs, the opener was 68bpm, the next four were all run together at 62bpm. I had to make notes because all of the songs were so similar that I couldn’t keep track of which was which. They were all just cymbal swells and slight variations of tribal type tom grooves.

Man that’s an accurate description and really good answer to the original question. That is what it is.
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
But it makes cents to them.
I think some churches take the viewpoint of; If you're part of the worship band, then you are a part of the congregation therefore you are obligated to donate your time to the church. I don't think they pay the choir.

That said, I think there was a thread on here where it was mentioned that someone had a paid church gig and they weren't a member of the congregation or even religious.

this is my situation a lot...I get many church gigs around Christmas and Easter, but it is on tymps, marimba, concert instruments...

but I ALWAYS give the money back to the church...most of the churches who do this are struggling, and while I am not at all religious, I am extremely spiritual, and was brought up "old school"...where you have empathy, charity, and respect the situations of others. It usually surprises the musical directors, but I did not get in to music to make money...I got into it to share that upper level - spiritual? - form of communication that music gives people
 

Spreggy

Silver Member
Worship?
That's when someone starts a Vinnie thread about some topic like "how can he be so amazingly awesome" or some such, and everybody chimes in OMG OMG he's so amazing!!!!! OMG OMG OMG best drummer ever I think!!! OMG OMG OMG!!!!!!!!!

;)
 
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