What Is The Best Product For Cleaning Cymbal Stands, Drum Racks, Hardware...

presto123

Member
Just curious what everybody uses. Especially older stands with rust spots here and there? I'm thinking a little CLR mixed with water. I bought some navel jelly, but it said don't use with chrome and stainless steel. Any suggestions appreciated.
 

JBoom

Senior Member
Noxon 7 is what I use on my chrome parts. Works wonders! Don't use it on cymbals unless you don't care about the painted logos, etc., as it will wash away the paint.
 

WallyY

Platinum Member
A wad of kitchen foil dipped in water and used as a scrubbie will clean and take off the rust spots on chrome.
 
G

Ghostnote

Guest
Blue magic is really good stuff. Wipe it on, lt it dry, then buff it off. It leaves a silicon film on your hardware to keep it shiny longer and to help guard against corrosion.
 

markdrum

Silver Member
There are numerous videos out on YouTube that show how well aluminium foil and carbonated drinks work on old, rusty chrome. I can remember seeing the backyard mechanics in my old neighbourhood using this combination with great results. Using 0000 steel wool with meguires also does wonders.
 

JohnPloughman

Silver Member
In my opinion as a collector and restorer of vintage drums, using any grade of steel wool will leave you with a life time of regrets and well deserved sorrow.

Never use an abrasive to "clean" anything. Unless it is covered in rust, and all other methods have been applied without adequate result. Steel wool is the absolute worst thing you could use. Combine Steel Wool with a cutting agent, whether that is a polish, WD-40, some other sort of petroleum product, or whatever, all you are doing is scratching your hardware.

Don't believe me? Clean your nice pretty chrome snare drum/hardware as suggested.
But first... photograph it in the sunlight.
Then photograph it after, and compare.
 

markdrum

Silver Member
I've used it on stands and on several steel drums with great results. Always test on an area that won't be visible after reassembly, always a good idea with any cleaning method, and take your time. Actually aluminium foil is a very mild, soft, abrasive but it is abrasive. Like I said, test first and take your time. I've heard a lot of people talk down Barkeepers Friend because it has abrasive qualities but a lot of people swear by it. Don't use abrasives on the softer metals like copper, bronze and especially brass. Try different ideas and stick with what works for you. The guy who told me about 0000 steel wool and meguiars has been restoring expensive, vintage cars for decades and he loves that combination. Your mileage may vary.
 

presto123

Member
In my opinion as a collector and restorer of vintage drums, using any grade of steel wool will leave you with a life time of regrets and well deserved sorrow.

Never use an abrasive to "clean" anything. Unless it is covered in rust, and all other methods have been applied without adequate result. Steel wool is the absolute worst thing you could use. Combine Steel Wool with a cutting agent, whether that is a polish, WD-40, some other sort of petroleum product, or whatever, all you are doing is scratching your hardware.

Don't believe me? Clean your nice pretty chrome snare drum/hardware as suggested.
But first... photograph it in the sunlight.
Then photograph it after, and compare.
Did anybody suggest steel wool in this thread? What is your go to cleaning product?
 

JohnPloughman

Silver Member
Did anybody suggest steel wool in this thread? What is your go to cleaning product?
Actually in Post #7. Perhaps I should have QUOTED the post in order to give relevance to my opinion. Nah. Steel wool sucks.

For initial cleaning... Dawn and water. Soft cotton cloths. Meguiars, Mothers, Turtle Wax Chrome cleaners/polishers again with soft cotton cloths. I also use Never Dull, Blue Magic in the spray can and crème. I will top it off with a good wax... Mothers Carnauba works well. But never brasso, anything containing abrasives, nor steel wool. Steel wool... is an absolute last resort product.....and this... is the sunshiny results it brings.



The drum below is 50 years old. This is what clean chrome should look like at 50.
 
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Trip McNealy

Gold Member
For heavier cleaning/polish/restoration needs I use Flitz creme.. nice stuff. After that for regular cleaning or polishing I use Dunlop 65 drum shell/hardware spray on my kits and hardware.
 

WallyY

Platinum Member
How about putting the stands in the dishwasher with a squirt of car polishing compound and then wiping them down with a wet rag of iso alcohol.

Use a shotgun mop to dry and oil the insides.
 

gdmoore28

Gold Member
In my opinion as a collector and restorer of vintage drums, using any grade of steel wool will leave you with a life time of regrets and well deserved sorrow.
Hi John,

You have a beautiful drum collection, my friend. I have to look it over again every time you post!

I will mildly disagree with your total ban on using steel wool, though. I've been using 0000 and finer wool for over fifty years as a last-resort remover of light corrosion on chrome. Once my initial learning curve was overcome, I've been able to use it with great success with unnoticeable scratches. Whoever tackled (literally!) that snare still has some learning to do.

I will note, too, a word of caution regarding steel wool grading. Some off-shore suppliers tend to be quite liberal with their grading methods. Buying wool labeled "fine" or "extrafine" does not always yield promising results. Know your supplier. Be careful.

Like anything, even with liquid polish, any careless idiot can damage chrome with enough aggressiveness. Ask me how I know. And, without doubt, the first cleaner used should always be the mildest. But once the corrosion has set in and the chemicals will no longer remove them, FINE or ExtraFine steel wool used carefully and judiciously is still the go to.

GeeDeeEmm
 

markdrum

Silver Member
Hi John,

You have a beautiful drum collection, my friend. I have to look it over again every time you post!

I will mildly disagree with your total ban on using steel wool, though. I've been using 0000 and finer wool for over fifty years as a last-resort remover of light corrosion on chrome. Once my initial learning curve was overcome, I've been able to use it with great success with unnoticeable scratches. Whoever tackled (literally!) that snare still has some learning to do.

I will note, too, a word of caution regarding steel wool grading. Some off-shore suppliers tend to be quite liberal with their grading methods. Buying wool labeled "fine" or "extrafine" does not always yield promising results. Know your supplier. Be careful.



Like anything, even with liquid polish, any careless idiot can damage chrome with enough aggressiveness. Ask me how I know. And, without doubt, the first cleaner used should always be the mildest. But once the corrosion has set in and the chemicals will no longer remove them, FINE or ExtraFine steel wool used carefully and judiciously is still the go to.

GeeDeeEmm
I've always had good luck when I use 0000 steel wool >carefully<. I do it purely by hand and I make sure that I use some sort of polish or other form of lubricant. I've also had good results with Quick-Glo. Just be sure to clean and polish in a back and forth motion, never circular. Works great on glass too!
 

JohnPloughman

Silver Member
"Last resort" right up there along with... don't try this at home. These stunts are performed by a professional driver on a closed course.
 
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