What is a "Stage Ride"?

prokofi5

Junior Member
I've come across a couple used Sabian Stage Rides but I can't find anything on what they're intended for. Is it just a lower level line like a recording vs. a stage kit or are they intending a different sound?
 

MrPockets

Gold Member
Just marketing mumbo jumbo. I think the cymbal in question is part of the AAX line which is described by Sabian as modern and bright.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
If I remember correctly, they came out with Stage and Studio models at the same time, the Stage being the thicker and the Studio being thinner between the corresponding models. The idea was you use the Studio models in the studio, and the Stage models on stage. Interesting marketing ploy to get us to buy 2 sets of cymbals.
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
Interesting marketing ploy to get us to buy 2 sets of cymbals.

I've heard that the stage model is too loud for the studio and that the studio model refuses to make sound on stage. Bringing the wrong cymbal to a given setting means you can't play at all. This is why it's important to own seven sets of cymbals and label each for specialized use. It's impossible to function otherwise.

Tommy Aldridge is a good example of gear sensibility. He reports that he makes no changes to his setup whether he's live or in the studio. His philosophy is that what sounds good live translates to the studio just fine. That's my conviction as well.
 

newoldie

Silver Member
I had a 20 Stage Ride and loved it. While it wasn't a "loud" cymbal IMO, it had great articulation, a quality that I value in a main Ride.

Since I favored a somewhat thinner main ride I could crash as well, and the Stage was too thick to open up, I sold it and eventually settled on a 21 AAX Groove Ride and a 21 AA Bash Ride as my 2 main rides that I now use.

But I wouldn't hesitate to recommend the Stage Ride if that thickness isn't an issue for someone else's style.
 

opentune

Platinum Member
Stage series (rides, crashes) have a slightly higher profile and more weight than a Studio. If you listen to sound files the Stage and Studio of any Sabian model (HHX, AAX) thee Stage sounds slightly brighter. I'd agree any Stage ride can be used anywhere.
 

KamaK

Platinum Member
I think the Stage/Studio monikers were a marketing tool used to convince Medium/Thin owners that they needed two sets of cymbals. The tool had the potential to double sales.

In fairness, most pop genres encourage exaggerated physical performances in a live/amplified setting in order to evoke a higher perceived energy by the audience. I probably wouldn't gig my K-Thins in an amplified rock band. I'd probably destroy them, and they be buried sonically in the electric chorus and screams.
 

Spreggy

Silver Member
I have an HHX Stage Ride 20", used it for gigs (bars and weddings) for years. Decent stick definition, has an interesting shimmer to it. Loud enough for rock and roll.
 

bermuda

Drummerworld Pro Drummer - Administrator
Staff member
If I remember correctly, they came out with Stage and Studio models at the same time, the Stage being the thicker and the Studio being thinner between the corresponding models. The idea was you use the Studio models in the studio, and the Stage models on stage. Interesting marketing ploy to get us to buy 2 sets of cymbals.

Given the cost of cymbals, it's not likely a drummer could be persuaded to buy additional cymbals, unless they really need additional sounds. In that case, they would need to buy other cymbals to get other sounds/textures. Unlike a snare that can be made to sound like a dozen different drums, a cymbal has a single, unique sound and only a few textures governed by how hard it is struck.

If a drummer needs a different cymbal sound, they need to get a different cymbal. I don't think any amount of marketing could make a drummer spend $1000 on cymbals that they don't need.
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
It's common for drummers to spend a thousand dollars (and a whole hell of a lot more than that) on gear they don't need. "Want" and "need" are entirely different motives. An in-depth consumer analysis would likely uncover that "want" is the primary driver behind a substantial percentage of purchases.

Note: I'm not passing judgement here, just stating a fact.
 
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bermuda

Drummerworld Pro Drummer - Administrator
Staff member
It's common for drummers to spend a thousand dollars (and a whole hell of a lot more than that) on gear they don't need. "Want" and "need" are entirely different motives. An in-depth consumer analysis would likely uncover that "want" is the primary driver behind a substantial percentage of purchases.

Note: I'm not passing judgement here, just stating a fact.

Agreed that most of us have acquired some gear that we don't need and may not even use. But I think that applies more to drums and percussion than to cymbals. That is, if someone has $800 in their pocket when they walk into a music store, will they be more attracted to a new snare, or to a new ride, crash and hats? I believe the physicality and look (and display potential) of the drum would outweigh the desire for the cymbals. Well, unless you're me, buying-up cymbals wherever I find them! But mine tend to be random purchases, typically '80s and older, rarely a whole set, and not tied to any former marketing by companies.

But I know that marketing is crucial in guiding purchases of almost any kind. I just think that drummers are more likely to buy a drum than a cymbal as an impulse purchase, whereas most pros buy only what they need, when they need it. Again, unless it's me. :)
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
Agreed that most of us have acquired some gear that we don't need and may not even use. But I think that applies more to drums and percussion than to cymbals. That is, if someone has $800 in their pocket when they walk into a music store, will they be more attracted to a new snare, or to a new ride, crash and hats? I believe the physicality and look (and display potential) of the drum would outweigh the desire for the cymbals. Well, unless you're me, buying-up cymbals wherever I find them! But mine tend to be random purchases, typically '80s and older, rarely a whole set, and not tied to any former marketing by companies.

But I know that marketing is crucial in guiding purchases of almost any kind. I just think that drummers are more likely to buy a drum than a cymbal as an impulse purchase, whereas most pros buy only what they need, when they need it. Again, unless it's me. :)

This would be the basis of an interesting thread: What do you have more of that you barely use -- drums or cymbals? In accordance with your point, I'm envisioning reports of twenty snare drums stacked in a closet, but I suspect we'd get an illustrious range of inventories.

The gear we own is very much a function of personality. Some players like a singular, all-purpose setup that's easy to maintain. Others take an application-specific approach, designating a different drum or cymbal for everything they do. Neither way is right or wrong. Results are in the eye (or ear) of the beholder.
 

bermuda

Drummerworld Pro Drummer - Administrator
Staff member
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