What helps you increase your speed?

Whereas when I think of speed, I'm thinking more of Jazz drummers who sound like they have marching band or orchestral backgrounds and play really quick stuff on snare, mostly with a light touch and a lot of finesse. I'm a Rock guy, but I've never had much use for the speed Rock stuff. My speedometer tops out somewhere around Motorhead.
Yes, good shout. My teacher was a jazz drummer schooled in rudimental drumming and as you can imagine, he got around the kid pretty sharpish and inspired his students by demonstrating what was possible. :)(y)
 
Regarding gaining speed I have heard three comments:

1) One educator was saying that there are certain exercises that help a drummer increase speed. He did not elaborate, but as an analogy he mentioned that sprint runners practice differently than marathon runners.

2) Rick Dior mentioned the size of hands and height. Of course this is not something that everyone can change, but it may give the drummer a natural advantage in speed.

3) John Riley often mentions the concept of "the headroom". My understanding is that he is a big proponent of this concept and as an example if a rhythm should be played at 60 BPM for a song, it is best to practice the beat at a faster BPM to gain speed. In this way playing the sound at a lower BPM will become natural and much easier without making any mistakes.
 
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Wow, I'm being quoted! Put it on my epitaph! (Thanks for the shout-out.)
There were a lot of great nuggets in your vid. They will actually help me "reset" how I practice on the pad.

I talked to a kid asking about what he was learning in his drum lessons. He replied that his teacher had him working on getting his speed up to XXX BPM. I asked him about learning rudiments... kid said, Nope, we aren't doing any of that (yet). Nothing on snare drum either, just playing drumset.

In a nutshell: no context to what the kid was learning.
 
There are rudiments like the various rolls and diddles that sound great with speed. Often more notes isn't a flash thing at all, it's about getting a certain feel and sound and sometimes it takes X number of notes in a certain amount of space to express something. Speed doesn't have to be a "hero" thing.
 
There are rudiments like the various rolls and diddles that sound great with speed. Often more notes isn't a flash thing at all, it's about getting a certain feel and sound and sometimes it takes X number of notes in a certain amount of space to express something. Speed doesn't have to be a "hero" thing.

EXACTLY!!!!

You still need to have "fast hands" to execute some simple/common things really...
-the first thing that comes to mind are swing and shuffle beats.
-If you do any kind of disco/dance feel beats where you are doing alternated 16ths on the hi hat, you need some speed and stamina
-Tom Sawyer (single handed 16th notes)....
-I use diddle speed when I play train beats just to give a little extra embellishment (to me a train beat is just a marching band cadence beat)
 
I've found the gradual increase in strokes is limited by the original, inhibiting technique. A technique change is required for this gradual increase stuff to work. Which depends on your own musculature, finger control etc..so all that needs consideration. The most comfortable, controlling, lightest grip works for me. I practice as quietly as I can-strokes are lower and more controlled for me- then increase the volume/stick height.
But first:
I play 5 stroke rolls, alternating hands at a med tempo then speed up until technique suffers. Then do the same with 7 stroke and 8 stroke rolls.
Also play 3 single hand strokes- triples, alt hands- then up to 4 strokes and eventually 8 then back to 6 and down to doubles. So rrr-lll, etc.
Everything helps. Starts are at comfortable tempos not slowly, per se.
 
I've found the gradual increase in strokes is limited by the original, inhibiting technique. A technique change is required for this gradual increase stuff to work. Which depends on your own musculature, finger control etc..so all that needs consideration. The most comfortable, controlling, lightest grip works for me. I practice as quietly as I can-strokes are lower and more controlled for me- then increase the volume/stick height.

If I understand you correctly, this is what I refer to as "stages" of speed, each requiring it's own natural modification of the fundamental technique.
 
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If I understand you correctly, this is what I refer to as "stages" of speed, each requiring its own natural modification of the fundamental technique.
Right, drives me 😝. Skip a mod, reintroduce a variation, when, how? Lots of experimenting. Depends on your own muscle memory...or age.
 
Training much like an athlete. You want the force and quick shortening velocity of fast twitch but you also need the endurance for force maintenance over a prolonged period of slow twitch. So you have to develop speed and endurance to maintain that speed. In training your body naturally learns to recruit the body parts wrist, fingers, forearms, arms and timing of antagonistic muscles and activities thst allow you to attain that speed and then keep it up. Simple motions are way more complex than simple levers used in demonstrations in intro anatomy and physiology texts. You are also training brain and honing speed of conduction pathways. There is a lot of variation in how people do it. Everyone doesn’t do it the same but I’d expect that diversity in any population.
 
I do things slow-fast-slow....

I will get to a "trouble tempo" - where I can't play the passage with proper technique - the note that tempo. The next few days I will slowly work my self past that tempo by adding 5 beats per session.

recently it has been flam rudiments

say I am working Flam Accents:
- I will set the met to slowly speed up from 120bpm
- it adds 3 beats to the tempo every 4 measures
- currently, I can get up to about 170 with good technique, 190 is where my left hand starts to tense up
- so I spend the next few reps/day just going from 120-190
- after a while, I relax gettin up to 190, so then I add 10 more beats and push to that
- once I get to the "trouble tempo", I stay there for a while, then slow back town incrementally like I sped up

I have been using this system for years, and do it with hands, feet, drum set beats, scales on bass and marimba....

I sort of got the idea from weight lifting:
if I want to bench 300lbs, I don't start with 300 on the bar, I work up to it incrementally over periods of time
I have to break down the parts to understand them (and have them committed to muscle memory) before I can play all together, for example the bass drums will be going on a fast steady beat but the toms and snare will change or the do a stop and go kind of thing, I have to understand all the parts before being able to put them all together and at the correct speed, the second part is the stamina required and once both are achieved then I can play relaxed and sound good.
Example song that I am learning here:

 
@Jonathan Curtis "Speed out of context is worthless." Great statement and so important to remember!

Slow and steady wins the race.
My drummer buddy...
( a really good jazz and funk drummer; I'm a guitar player, w/practice pad)
...is always saying to me (in my rudiments practice)
" LOW AND SLOW"!

- I know what the 'slow' means, not sure about 'low' ? Keep your sticks & strokes close to the drums, pad?

(but he does stress lots of repetition, at different speeds...)
 
- I know what the 'slow' means, not sure about 'low' ? Keep your sticks & strokes close to the drums, pad?
Sounds like you will need to ask your drum buddy on that one. I don't know what he means by "low" either. If it's a reference to stick height, stick height changes depending on the type of stroke and speed.

Is this drummer buddy a trained musician or is he self-taught?

Slow and steady wins the race, means that in order to play fast, one must first learn how to play and stroke things out at a slow tempo.

Repetition at different speeds unfortunately isn't worth much if your hand technique is not proper. Sounds like this guy may not really be helping you progress.
 
Sounds like you will need to ask your drum buddy on that one. I don't know what he means by "low" either. If it's a reference to stick height, stick height changes depending on the type of stroke and speed.

Is this drummer buddy a trained musician or is he self-taught?

Slow and steady wins the race, means that in order to play fast, one must first learn how to play and stroke things out at a slow tempo.
Trained, took lessons from Joe Morello in college, and now teaches and produces too.
He is remarkable. He will send me quick videos, ex. the full stroke, and a few rudiment patterns.

I'm still happily on the first page, 'page 5' of Stick Control book!
 
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