WHAT DRUMMERS DO YOU HEAR IN YOUR PLAYING?

NickSchles

Junior Member
So, the last few months I’ve been neck-deep in learning Tower Of Power songs and David Garibaldi’s grooves. Between lessons, I got noodling and came up with this groove:


Now, we all know and love half-time shuffles, yet it dawned on me that Garibaldi has started to show in my playing, and I think this groove manifests it in one way or another. I’m really pleased about it, as I really love his fluid playing and how he adds colour with ghost notes and deepen groove!

That said, the way I’ve mixed the groove, the ghost notes aren’t subtle anymore due to the compression, but I wanted something dirty-sounding. Not too long ago I put up a video on Instagram discussing what makes a drummer unique and the benefits of learning material note for note. Watch it here, if you like…

If you'd like a PDF transcription of the groove, you can download it here.

What drummers do you hear in your playing?
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
I am undeniably influenced by:
Niel Peart
Scott Rockenfield
Nicko McBrain
Jeff Nelson
Phil Ehart
Tim "Herb" Alexander
Mark Zonder

on the jazz side it is mostly:
Joe Morello
Gene Krupa
Jeff Hamilton
Peter Erskine
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
Great mix, dude! That's awesome. I love Neil Peart, RIP!

thanks! Neil, and the whole thing that is Rush - was like my 2nd set of parents growing up. I was crushed when they ended it, and then devastated when he passed

on the point of influences, I know quite a few people who say that they have no influences...that they are "totally original"...and I think that is literally impossible, unless you have been isolated from all music. I have neveer understood the whole thing about denying your influences. I am proud to have been inspired by these players, and sort of incorporate elements of their playing into mine in honor of them
 

mikyok

Platinum Member
Poor mans Jeff Porcaro/Purdie/Jim Gordon.

Had a big Stewart Copeland and Herb phase as well but it's rare I get to play that kinda stuff, same with all the Bonzo and Paice I leant as a kid.
 

bermuda

Drummerworld Pro Drummer - Administrator
Staff member
Ringo, Hal Blaine, Jim Gordon, and some Bozzio from his mainstream Missing Persons era.
 

Al Strange

Well-known member
I steal things from pretty much every drummer I can, but the main guys who shaped my playing during my formative years would be Stewart Copeland, Rod Morgenstein, Deen Castronovo, Aynsley Dunbar, Paul Wheeler and Tommy Aldridge (to name but a few)...then I watched the first Buddy Rich memorial VHS (that’s a video tape kids!) which opened up my mind to a wider range of players/genres. I’m nowhere near any of them of course!! 😂 (y)
 
I realized recently I do a fair amount of pseudo-Stewart Copeland fills on my hi-hats during grooves, which I find kind of funny, since while I absolutely adore his playing now, back in the early 80s, I was knocked out by his playing but didn't actually approve of it—I thought he was too busy. (I was young and very, very wrong.) And I definitely got my love of splashes from Mr. Copeland.
I sometimes sweep back and forth on my hats like Ringo, and almost always stick my left elbow out too far like he does, although I've been working on fixing that for a while.
And if I'm not careful, I can find myself finishing fills on the 2—rather than the 1—like Phil Collins, far too often. (I assume it goes without saying that I'm not a patch on any of those fine gentlemen.)
I play a ton of (too many) hi-hat barks and snare drum ghost notes and I've been wondering where I picked up my love of those from. Everywhere, I guess? (And/or James Brown drummers, but I suppose that's simply repeating myself.) Hmm...now that I think of it, the ghost notes are probably from Dr William Bruford...
 

BrokenStick

Junior Member
I aspire to be a faceless Nashville-sounding drummer that's as solid as a rock, consistent, and perfectly supports a song. Nothing more. Nothing less.
I've no idea who I might sound like.
So, the last few months I’ve been neck-deep in learning Tower Of Power songs and David Garibaldi’s grooves. Between lessons, I got noodling and came up with this groove:


Now, we all know and love half-time shuffles, yet it dawned on me that Garibaldi has started to show in my playing, and I think this groove manifests it in one way or another. I’m really pleased about it, as I really love his fluid playing and how he adds colour with ghost notes and deepen groove!

That said, the way I’ve mixed the groove, the ghost notes aren’t subtle anymore due to the compression, but I wanted something dirty-sounding. Not too long ago I put up a video on Instagram discussing what makes a drummer unique and the benefits of learning material note for note. Watch it here, if you like…

If you'd like a PDF transcription of the groove, you can download it here.

What drummers do you hear in your playing?
I wouldn't have a clue. I almost never look up who is playing on whatever I am listening to. There are obvious exceptions to this, but I usually throw several hundred albums on the Sonos and just let it go until it runs out. Early on, Ginger Baker, Mitche Mitchell, whoever drummer was with Journey before Smith, Bonham, Pace. et al. I've been listening to a lot of Doors lately. God I hope I don't sound like that guy.
 

Otto

Platinum Member
no-way...last time I really asked myself that and started digging around I changed how I set up my set and changed my whole pulse.

Don't need that expense and aggravation again!

My sound is now mine...all mine.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Probably anyone whose songs I've tried to learn. I'm sure I've ripped off licks and beats from everyone.

If I had to name specifically, when I was gigging we would regularly be compared to Obituary and Bolt Thrower, so those guys.
 

BrokenStick

Junior Member
no-way...last time I really asked myself that and started digging around I changed how I set up my set and changed my whole pulse.

Don't need that expense and aggravation again!

My sound is now mine...all mine.
Not sure I get this whole idea of "being unique" and having "a sound." It is always unique from first to last. As for being distinctive, well maybe that is a different animal. I've NEVER considered trying to sound like someone else or cared if I did or didn't. Musicians are like sponges; they absorb whatever they come into contact with. If you wring them out, you get a composite that is comprised of everything that went in and is at least different if not distinctive than what went before it. And it is compounded by the idea that we soak up what others have absorbed before us. Bonham ripped off Max Roach, and I borrowed that from Bonham decades before I knew that lick came from Max. Not sure if any of that makes sense--awful tired.
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
Not sure I get this whole idea of "being unique" and having "a sound." It is always unique from first to last. As for being distinctive, well maybe that is a different animal. I've NEVER considered trying to sound like someone else or cared if I did or didn't. Musicians are like sponges; they absorb whatever they come into contact with. If you wring them out, you get a composite that is comprised of everything that went in and is at least different if not distinctive than what went before it. And it is compounded by the idea that we soak up what others have absorbed before us. Bonham ripped off Max Roach, and I borrowed that from Bonham decades before I knew that lick came from Max. Not sure if any of that makes sense--awful tired.

totally true...we would all be wrung out down to Baby Dodds, Zutty Singleton and Chick Webb if we are tracing that far back...
 
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