What drum kits do you consider to be "legendary"?

s1212z

Well-known member
CD Maples - about 30 years and they are the least innovative drums N&C have ever made. Not that they are bad at all.
What are your thoughts on the other N&C line being more innovative comparatively?

I thought varying the plys to the drum size was/is very innovative, plus nodal point mounting...I don't know anyone else doing that at that time in 1983. In fact, not to do so it actually kinda backwards IMO and I hear many drum lines that keep a standard thickness down their tom line which in many instances creates the 'bad odd tom' that doesn't fit well with the rest of the set. I think this led to way to other modern methods and boutiques like custom edges, rings , grain layouts and then mix/matching woods to optimize tom balances.
 

petrez

Senior Member
I love both Signias and Genistas. Those were some of the best drums coming out of the ‘90s. Which makes me wonder, what the hell happneed with Premier? They were such a great drum company, then they seemingly vanished into thin air.
Think they did a major mistake with trying to incorporate all their high-end lines into the Premier Series, in my opinion a very forgettable line that really didn't stick out from the rest like the Signia and Genista, which had their own identity. The flat oval lugs was not very good looking, to me at least. I guess coupled with a lot of financial issues in the 2000's in which I have no real insight to, and very few retailers, things started to get bad very quickly. Sadly, I miss them competing in the top end segment. The newer eastern made and cheaper Genista kit from a few years back was just sad :(.
 
Last edited:

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
In terms of a product, I suppose there are legendary drums, but every time I meet a legendary player, they tend to geek-down the drums they play. I mean Bernard Purdie played a lot of those legendary Aretha hits with a Sonor kit, and even though he may have gushed about them (maybe in private?), I never got that impression that he was into his gear whenever I spoke with him. Like Buddy Rich, the gear is secondary to the music they make. So likewise, gear with me is like a revolving door thing. Nice things come and go, I guess I’m more into the music making aspects of music. Whatever gear helps me get it will be deemed legendary especially if it helps save my butt on the bandstand in the heat of the moment 😉
 

Bozozoid

Well-known member
Are the recording customs considered legendary?. I know they were super popular for a long time. Lots of legendary (drummers) playing them but I haven't heard alot of talk from drummers saying man..if I could get my hands on an 80's yamaha R.C. kit. Just wondering.
 

Neal Pert

Well-known member
Are the recording customs considered legendary?. I know they were super popular for a long time. Lots of legendary (drummers) playing them but I haven't heard alot of talk from drummers saying man..if I could get my hands on an 80's yamaha R.C. kit. Just wondering.

They're still in production; used ones still fetch a good amount of money. They were used on probably thousands of records in the 80s. Just about everyone played them. Lots of Yamaha's top endorsers still play them. I can't think of another 80s era kit that still has that kind of a following.
 

TK-421

Senior Member
Are the recording customs considered legendary?. I know they were super popular for a long time. Lots of legendary (drummers) playing them but I haven't heard alot of talk from drummers saying man..if I could get my hands on an 80's yamaha R.C. kit. Just wondering.
100 years from now when drummers carry their kits in their front pocket in the form of a tiny device that projects a “solid hologram” of a kit that can be played just like a real kit, people will still be talking about Recording Customs. So yeah, they’re legendary.

Of course they’ll also wonder how the hell drummers carried around huge, heavy drums, cymbals and hardware to gig after gig. So archaic!
 

Bozozoid

Well-known member
I'll bite my tongue. I myself owned an 80's piano black R.C. kit. In hind sight and views from Well..wrong time to do this. Legendary is one thing because drummers praised certain kits. I just never read where drummers pined for these particular kits. Legendary may be subjective. Widely used for a space in time? Yes. I've just got a chip on my shoulder on these particular drums at a particular point in time with lots of mirrored thoughts unlike Gretsch drums where drummers comb the internet for certain badged gretsch kits.
 

TK-421

Senior Member
Think they did a major mistake with trying to incorporate all their high-end lines into the Premier Series, in my opinion a very forgettable line that really didn't stick out from the rest like the Signia and Genista, which had their own identity. The flat oval lugs was not very good looking, to me at least. I guess coupled with a lot of financial issues in the 2000's in which I have no real insight to, and very few retailers, things started to get bad very quickly. Sadly, I miss them competing in the top end segment. The newer eastern made and cheaper Genista kit from a few years back before they put the company down for good was just sad :(.
I remember those flat oval lugs when they first debuted at NAMM. I thought they were hideous at first, but they gradually grew on me to the point where I could tolerate the site of them. But I never really liked them. I think that's about the time Premier started going downhill. I blame those ugly lugs.
 

Bozozoid

Well-known member
I remember those flat oval lugs when they first debuted at NAMM. I thought they were hideous at first, but they gradually grew on me to the point where I could tolerate the site of them. But I never really liked them. I think that's about the time Premier started going downhill. I blame those ugly lugs.
Hmm..flat oval lugs?..the ones on the elite kits?.
 

DrumWhipper

Member
Chris “Whipper” Layton’s “jungle” kit that he played when Stevie Ray Vaughan died.
 

SomeBadDrummer

Well-known member
Tama Starclassics have around almost 30 years, arguably still their best sounding line though I would take MIJ.

N&C CD Maple is almost 40s old, they had innovative features.
Absolutely agree with both.
 

SomeBadDrummer

Well-known member
When I created this thread, I wasn’t really referring to specific kits, like Tony William’s yellow Gretsch or Neil Peart’s candy apple red Tama kit. But yes, every kit you mentioned could definitely be considered legendary.
What’s wrong with Neil Peart’s candy apple red Tama kit? :unsure::ROFLMAO:
 

dwsabianguy

Senior Member
Gretsch Round Badge for sure
Camco Oaklawn kits
Slingerland from Niles
Ludwigs pre-Ringo
Yamaha Recording Custom
Sonor Horst Link Signature
Tama Starclassic
N&C CD Maples (specifically those from the 90s and 00s with the die cast hoop)
Anything made by Chris Brady

And maybe I'll get some flak for it, but DW Collectors Series have solidly placed themselves as legendary drums. Ubiquitous, reliable drums that are absolutely everywhere.
 

Chris Whitten

Well-known member
What are your thoughts on the other N&C line being more innovative comparatively?

I thought varying the plys to the drum size was/is very innovative, plus nodal point mounting...I don't know anyone else doing that at that time in 1983.
Both the Star Series and Horizon were extremely innovative. No one at N&C ever mentioned CD Maples to me in 1988.
I was under the impression they were launched around 1993, but maybe they were relaunched?
Having owned and played all three, CD Maples seem more like an attempt at a great sounding standard kit, competing with Tama, Pearl etc.
 
Last edited:
Top