What do YOU as a drummer like to see in a studio your recording in?

Trauzer_Kauff

Junior Member
Hey all,

My first post so, bare with me?

I'm a drummer who wants to track drummers so, I'm setting up a, drums only tracking room(no mixing)and am wondering what I'm not thinking of. I have some fairly decent gear, but would very much like to know what I'm over looking, or not concidering. any opinion would be greatly appreciated, thanks in advance, `The Kauff

Current gear listing,

22 input channel API
44 various Pre's
30 API EQ's
Neumann, AKG, Shure, Sennheiser, coles, royer, mics.
35 pairs of, hi end, Hi Hats
32 hi end, rides
All maple kit
All Bubinga kit
(2) 20" kiks
(2) 22" kiks
(2) 24" kiks
(1) 26" kik
32 hi end snares
(30) hi end compressors
SPL head phone amp(for drummer)
And a decent dedicated live room
 
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audiotech

Guest
An experienced audio engineer that knows how to use that audio equipment to it's full potential.

Dennis
 

drumr_102

Senior Member
An experienced audio engineer that knows how to use that audio equipment to it's full potential.

Dennis
+1

I remember going into a studio thinking I wasn't gonna like the kit, but it ended up sounding really good. I think more than anything I like to hear good samples proving that they can do a variety of things with the stuff they have.
 

?uesto

Silver Member
Where is this studio of yours, and do you charge the same as a gentlemen's club? Because I'd pay more...
 

caddywumpus

Platinum Member
Hardwood floors, a high ceiling, non-parallel walls, some acoustic treatment/baffles/bass traps, etc.

If I'm a drummer looking to use a drum tracking room, I want the room to sound really good. I mean, so good that I'd actually pay to do my tracking there instead of in my friend's basement or my other friend's garage, know what I'm sayin'...? Also, a good engineer is paramount.

I would also like to see mixing capabilities and other isolation rooms for recording the rest of the band, but it doesn't seem like this is what you have in mind...
 

topgun2021

Gold Member
Playboy posters on the wall so I have something easy on the eyes to look at.

I think you might as well buy up a bunch of pedals too, since you have all that going and buy different types of beaters.

Effects cymbals may also be a fun buy.

Racks/stands?
 

Trauzer_Kauff

Junior Member
Thanks for the great responces so far,

My original intension for my service, is just for drummers, a safe cofortable place of inspiration, and excelence, with the only real weakness(if any)being the drummer. I've played for 30 years now so, I can empathise there;)

So many people seem to be, "mixers" nowadays, with their home DAW's so, I don't really see any gain in that, for where I'm at right now. just good solid, highly mixable tracks, that anyone would want to mix, is what I'm after.

I do plan on having several sets of pedals, and yes, some FX cymbals, but... not really into buying crashes, as THAT would be a finacial loss, due to breakage, etc.

The room is good(not great... yet;) it's a start, and I plan on investing heavily as I progress. please keep the comments comming, good OR bad, as all is welcome. ~The Kauff
 

topgun2021

Gold Member
You could always make people pay for breaking equipment or have an insurance policy.

Or you could supervise and make people use crashes correctly.
 

Retrovertigo

Senior Member
for me it's all about the room. a tight recording space is an immediate turn off. i can mic all my stuff up in a crappy basement if i wanted. but what i really don't have is a good space to record in. that's what i look for in a studio. these days, engineers can work out of most studios so it's not much of a consideration as to who the house engineers are.
 

Pollyanna

Platinum Member
One thing I keep coming across is annoying mic stands.

I like stands that don't slowly sink down and are configured in such an unobtrusive way that doesn't make me feel that I'm cramped amongst stands and wires.
 

Nodiggie

Gold Member
Hardwood floors, a high ceiling, non-parallel walls, some acoustic treatment/baffles/bass traps, etc.

If I'm a drummer looking to use a drum tracking room, I want the room to sound really good. Also, a good engineer is paramount.
This...exactly for me too

and

The best most comfortable throne money can buy.
 

TNA

Senior Member
I think the most important thing I would look for if I am going to pay to get my drums recorded is a good sound engineer. I want someone with a proven track record and who can get me the sound that I want. A good sound engineer can make low end recording equipment sound expensive, but a bad engineer can make high end equipment sound cheap. If I am paying that much the expensive mics are a given, at that point I am paying for that persons service.
 

toddy

Platinum Member
to be fair i have my own studio so i wouldn't rent one lol. waste of money.
if you can't record a good kit sound with an sm57, an akg kick, & a pair of overheads then you're doing something wrong.

total price... £400?

if i'm recording my mate will sit there and press record, he doesn't have to do anything else does he?
on reaper i can even set an 8 bar count in to auto record for me

don't need any studio people. do all your own stuff learn it all do it all reap the rewards.

Anyway back to the question, a nice room.
 

bigbang

Pioneer Member
I would like to see more coffee machines....seriously.
I've been in a lot of studios and maybe one that I can think of off the top of my head has one.
 

burn-4

Senior Member
Food is good- like when I recorded last the engineer had bought loads of bread rolls and ham, cheese, haribo, cokes etc. Was so nice to just chill out and go and make yourself a sandwich and have a cold drink then get back to it- simple but effective.

As for sound wise- as others have mentioned; good sounding room and a great engineer
 

diegobxr

Silver Member
Maybe a set of electronic drums?? Or some pads at least.. in case someone wants some effects.

And.. if you wanna get extremely picky... having two rooms would be great also.

One big and lively and a second one small and dead-sounding. Or you could have some of those drummers' walls you can move around, like the ones they used in the old days. Vintage-sounding records are very on demand nowadays.

---

Other than that, I'd be happy just with a nice sounding kit, a nice room, good engineer and a few couches to hang around and have a beer.

I wish you success in this venture, cheers!
 

toddy

Platinum Member
Maybe a set of electronic drums?? Or some pads at least.. in case someone wants some effects.

And.. if you wanna get extremely picky... having two rooms would be great also.

One big and lively and a second one small and dead-sounding. Or you could have some of those drummers' walls you can move around, like the ones they used in the old days. Vintage-sounding records are very on demand nowadays.

---

Other than that, I'd be happy just with a nice sounding kit, a nice room, good engineer and a few couches to hang around and have a beer.

I wish you success in this venture, cheers!
^ this is a really good answer
most musicians won't care what microphones you have, if you can make them feel comfortables and record them at their best then they'll keep coming back!
 
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