What discussions have changed your mind about something on here?

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
That's a great time check exercise. If you can get through it without rushing or dragging, you're doing pretty well.
Whenever I'm playing and that song comes on, the first thing I do is sit up straight. It's so rigid and perfect. Slouching leads to sloppy, and Billie Jean is not sloppy. It dont swing. It does nothing but stay the course. It's definitely more difficult than it seems.
 

Cmdr. Ross

Silver Member
Whenever I'm playing and that song comes on, the first thing I do is sit up straight. It's so rigid and perfect. Slouching leads to sloppy, and Billie Jean is not sloppy. It dont swing. It does nothing but stay the course. It's definitely more difficult than it seems.
And it's a great example of how a "money beat" is usually a better choice than filling a song with gospel chops.
While impressive, I'm more impressed with a drummer Like Phil Rudd or Joey Kramer who can drive a band with 4-on-the-floor.
 

doggyd69b

Well-known member
And it's a great example of how a "money beat" is usually a better choice than filling a song with gospel chops.
While impressive, I'm more impressed with a drummer Like Phil Rudd or Joey Kramer who can drive a band with 4-on-the-floor.
That's why those songs are hard for me to play (again I can play them no problem). I just get bored and my mind starts drifting elsewhere because the drumming is not challenging enough I guess. but yes as timing exercises they are a lot more fun to play than just following a metronome. songs to use (besides Billie Jean) can be ACDCs Who made who, Ozzy's Shot in the Dark, Whitesnake's Is this love?, Animals as leaders Cafo (just kidding that one is a hard one to follow).
 

cbphoto

Gold Member
I’ve learned that an online forum can be successfully moderated to avoid politics & religion (I laughed the first time I read a @GruntersDad post, warning members to avoid P&R, thinking he was on a fool’s errand). It shows y’all care more about communication within this forum than P&R.

I’ve learned that brand fanboys actually do exist, and they aren’t a construct of my imagination.

It’s been confirmed that strangers will ask other strangers for [significant] buying advice without caring a whit about who is answering their query.

I‘ve realized that some things I hear from my instruments (e.g., the glassine quality of Paiste cymbals, the pronounced attack of bubinga shells) are universal and not a hallucination.

I’ve learned that drummers listen to news/announcements/reactions of others and react with empathy, care and understanding.

I’ve learned that finding a kick pedal that feels perfect requires the purchase and/or use of many pedals to determine what feels best. There is no shortcut.
 

dmacc_2

Well-known member
None.

Back in 'olden days' when there were newsgroups and bulletin boards, I confirmed some people share the same opinions as me and others don't.

To me, it's all good. The troubles begin when people insist they are correct.
 

paradiddle pete

Platinum Member
certain brands will not increase in value is not true. Some hold or even increase. I'm talking money. The " Real " value is up to you..
 

doggyd69b

Well-known member
certain brands will not increase in value is not true. Some hold or even increase. I'm talking money. The " Real " value is up to you..
The value is what people will accept something is worth. For example a $2 baseball can become worth $50k because it was used in an important game..(that just blows my mind) or the Frankenstein guitar that EVH built (and painted) which I believe it was worth some $50 or 100.. is worth something ridiculous now. Yes those things have some history tied to them. I guess in order for something to be worth much more than equal gear it has to have some hype or history or not be available anymore (becomes a collectors item) but only appraises at close to new price not way over... To me it is just dumb to pay hundreds of times the value of something unless it is done for charity. The Frankenstein guitar to me is worthless without EVH playing it, same goes for a lot of other things that people just assign any arbitrary value (and that other people actually pay).
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
. . . when I was a kid if a new instrument had one tiny scratch on it was discounted..
That's true. Minor blemishes once led to reduced prices. Now gear is purposely burned and battered to create a been-around-the-block (and perhaps survived-a-nuclear-assault) facade. I've always exposed gear to normal wear and tear through frequent setup, breakdown, and transport, but perhaps many of the online musicians of today, who play primarily at home and shoot self-made videos, want the appearance of travel without going anywhere. I don't anticipate putting gear on the market anytime soon, if ever again, but if I do, maybe I'll pound it with a hammer first and increase the value by a few hundred bucks.
 
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larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Everything affects everything.

I absorb whatever I don't know here, so by default it has to change me (or my thinking) a tiny tiny bit

So yes

Just one example: When I first heard "Shut up and play" from WhoIsTony?, yea that made a change in my attitude
 
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