What discussions have changed your mind about something on here?

doggyd69b

Well-known member
I tend to study things snd expound on what I read which is someone else’s info or can be someone else’s opinion and not my own. I think that confuses people. I never expressed my own opinion in the classroom- I’d avoid it like the plaque . But they were all bio related classes so thick with facts from book, however since most text out of date I would update info just not hold them responsible.
I have changed my mind on lots of issues -like the death penalty, my views on what and how we modify life has changed -I have always been super supportive however now I think we yield the sword like fools and I think we are going to cut off our own heads.
Death penalty.... I'm only for it when it has been proven without a shadow of a doubt that the recipient of the punishment did the crime, and DNA proof has sometimes not been good enough.. so it would have to be caught in the act mostly. Terrorists and spies don't get a pass, they get executed just like their victims would have had they been able to complete their quest. but that is for another thread and another topic.
 

AzHeat

Platinum Member
This is a great list & I relate to 99% of it.
I actually increased my double bass lessons rather than lessen them. Many here helped me focus more on getting it right than I'd ever gotten before.
This place killed my GAS as well. I learned to love what I have.
Nothing wrong with leaning and expanding double bass technique. I just found that for me I don't really dig blast beats, so outside of some 80s metal (I can cover most with a single pedal) I was better off focusing my efforts on other techniques, like adding accents with hats, expanding 4 limb independence, etc. I'm sure I'll get back to it at some point. For now, I'm too busy with brain twisters. My brain loves brain twisters.
 
Last edited:

Cmdr. Ross

Silver Member
Nothing wrong with leaning and expanding double bass technique. I just found that for me I don't really dig blast beats, so outside of some 80s metal (I can cover most with a single pedal) I was better off focusing my efforts on other techniques, like adding accents with hats, expanding 4 limb independence, etc. I'm sure I'll get back to it at some point. For now, I'm too busy with brain twisters. My brain loves brain twisters.
I was never a blaster. I respect drummers who can do that, but it gets old real fast.
I just wanted to do songs like Live Wire by Crue, Overkill by Motorhead & I Wish You Were A Beer by Cycle Sluts From Hell as even as I could.
The new Trick shaft is helping. ;)
 
Last edited:

AzHeat

Platinum Member
I was never a blaster. I respect drummers who can do that, but it gets old real fast.
I just wanted to do songs like Live Wire by Crue, Rock-N-Roll by Motorhead & I Wish You Were A Beer by Cycle Sluts From Hell as even as I could.
The new Trick shaft is helping. ;)
I had forgotten about Live Wire. I just put that on and it's at my max with single pedal, not speed but sustain. I was really happy when the bridge arrived for a well needed break. :eek: Adding that to my list of must jam to tunes!
 
Last edited:

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
I realized that after 40 years of playing, I knew nothing. Here's what's changed in the last 5 since being on this forum.
- My kit shrunk by three toms and four cymbals - Didn't realize I'd not only not miss them, but end up actually hating the extra bulk
- 2 ply to single ply coated head conversion
- learned not to dent heads before above conversion
- Thinner cymbals are not only more versatile, but a heck of a lot easier to control.
- Metal snares are amazing
- I learned how to tune
- I learned I needed lessons....bad
- I hated Gretsch for never changing and wouldn't give them a second look. Now, I get why.
- I never had much use for the double bas I clung to for so long. Not that it had no use, but I got far better focusing on bringing in hat chicks and independence than ever trying to get faster on double pedals.
- I thought I understood finesse. Knew nothing of finesse till I changed to single ply heads and thinner cymbals. Probably still don't.
- Tune Bot is awesome and taught me how to tune, now don't need it as much and drums sound fantastic.
- Just tune by ear has no value if you have no foundation or understanding to work from.
- Different woods sound different, but not as much as marketing says.
- Different bearing edges sound way different than the marketing says.
- This place caused me GAS.
- This place killed my GAS.
There's more, but that's all I remember for now. All came about from reading this forum and experimenting.

I agree with all as well...except that i affirmed the value large drum kits more...in that if the gig calls for a 6 piece, 9 cymbal set up, I will use it...same as my 4 piece 3 cymbal set up. I have learned to look at everything as a tool to use in a situation

and this site has also given me GAS, but also reaffirmed my decisions to not have to spend money on every new thing
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
I'm a brand new member; this is my very first post. I joined because this forum kept coming up as I was Googling this, that, and the other thing.

Right now, based on a Drummerworld thread, I'm thinking about mounting my ride and crash on the kickdrum mantle, instead of using independent stands.

welcome to the boat ride...grab a life jacket and hang on!!!
 

doggyd69b

Well-known member
Nothing wrong with leaning and expanding double bass technique. I just found that for me I don't really dig blast beats, so outside of some 80s metal (I can cover most with a single pedal) I was better off focusing my efforts on other techniques, like adding accents with hats, expanding 4 limb independence, etc. I'm sure I'll get back to it at some point. For now, I'm too busy with brain twisters. My brain loves brain twisters.
There are many songs that don't have blast beats, but playing them with a single pedal would be quite challenging.
Many Disturbed songs, he uses a lot of slow double bass patterns as one example the songs mistress and the song striken.
There are many other examples but if rock or metal is not for you then the choices shrink.
 

AzHeat

Platinum Member
There are many songs that don't have blast beats, but playing them with a single pedal would be quite challenging.
Many Disturbed songs, he uses a lot of slow double bass patterns as one example the songs mistress and the song striken.
There are many other examples but if rock or metal is not for you then the choices shrink.
I play a lot of rock and older Metal. Every so often a song is just too fast to cover with a single pedal. I haven’t had a “need” to focus on them since I’m not playing them live. Been mostly focusing on prof rock, rockabilly, world beats funk and whatever hits me that day. I have a double pedal on my practice pads. I go nuts on that every once in a while, just to keep smooth, but haven’t attached it to the kit for a while. I’ll keep pushing for faster runs on a single.

To be quite honest, I don’t like where my HH ends up with a double pedal. It’s just not as comfortable to reach the hats that way. Different motivations I suppose.
 

Trigger

Senior Member
I learned the importance of reso heads
I learned that once you can do 16ths at 230bpm on the kit that it is extremely one-dimensonal and unless you're playing in a death metal band, doing it will make everyone else stop playing with you
I learned that people don't really want to hear the drummer except for kick and snare on 1 and 3
I learned that only drummers like toms 99% of the time (ignoring the phil collins fill)
I learned that noodling around on the hi hats during a simple 4/4 beat completely kills the groove and makes you sound like an amateur
I learned that playing consistently for 3 and half minutes is much much harder than doing stupid 32nd fills around the kit.
I learned that people other than drummers really don't like china cymbals
I learned that compression is a game changer
I learned that good cymbals are much more important than 'good' drums
I learned (thanks to youtube) that most drums basically sound the same and that the rest is marketing. Adding 1 ply of endangered wood isn't going to make your kit sound $5000 better, whatever that means.
 

Al Strange

Well-known member
I don’t know if I’ve ever changed my mind about anything but I’m always open to other ideas and viewpoints to help me improve as a player. I’ve definitely made a couple of purchases based on discussions, input and advice. :unsure: (y)
 

doggyd69b

Well-known member
I learned the importance of reso heads
I learned that once you can do 16ths at 230bpm on the kit that it is extremely one-dimensonal and unless you're playing in a death metal band, doing it will make everyone else stop playing with you
I learned that people don't really want to hear the drummer except for kick and snare on 1 and 3
I learned that only drummers like toms 99% of the time (ignoring the phil collins fill)
I learned that noodling around on the hi hats during a simple 4/4 beat completely kills the groove and makes you sound like an amateur
I learned that playing consistently for 3 and half minutes is much much harder than doing stupid 32nd fills around the kit.
I learned that people other than drummers really don't like china cymbals
I learned that compression is a game changer
I learned that good cymbals are much more important than 'good' drums
I learned (thanks to youtube) that most drums basically sound the same and that the rest is marketing. Adding 1 ply of endangered wood isn't going to make your kit sound $5000 better, whatever that means.
The Billie Jean beat is harder to play than most people think. Yes I can play it, but I have difficulty staying focused due to how simple it is to play so I have to really focus to play it clean (not dragging or rushing) all the way through.
 

Old Dog new Cans

Senior Member
It wasn't a particular thread or discussion that enlightened me per say. I was a Remo/Zildjian guy. To be honest, I had RARELY seen ANYTHING else in the 80s and 90s (for those that don't know, I took a drumming hiatus from about 01-18).
Locally growing up, I had literally only heard of Remo. Needless to say, I also have included Evans, Aquarian and even Attack. Also, plenty of Paiste, Meinl, and Wuhan, others as well.

I just realized that there was more to this world than Remo and Zildjian. I would have found these things obviously, without DW, but it was nice to SEE what I was missing.

I was also reminded of how people on forums can be complete frickin' jerks. Someone actually called me a moron in some other language. So, I sent him a PM about his mother and I. Never heard from him again. :unsure:
 

KarlCrafton

Platinum Member
Maybe this will change your mind about bass drum sizes:

I like Rick's videos. He has some cool ones.
I love bass drums.
LIVE I use the 20x26, or 18x26.
Recording, I like the 16x24. It's fat, full, and punchy. Ilike the 16" depth because I can shorten the sound if I want, to make it like a shorter shell, but, if it's short and I want a longer "note" I'd have to use reverb or something.
I start fairly open. Coated Amb, or Coated Emp on the 26, smooth white front. 4" hole.
I have a piece of 1" open cell poly foam at the bottom of the shellI almost touching the heads. That lets the drum breath, but it completely stops any of that "basketball" ping from ever happening when you are getting sounds.
I use either a Creative Percussion Slick Kick impact patch, or a piece of coated Ambassador head gaffed to the head at the edges.
I can shorten the resonance from the heads even more from the outside a little if I want a tighter sound.
I do like a coated P3 on the 24, not as much on the 26, and I don't care for the sound of the clear P3.
We use 2 mics for recording. One I love is a D112, and the secondary mic is of the engineers preference, or one of those reverse wired speaker mics.
I like those sub mics. They actually have a cool, somewhat tight sound and get a lot of stuff other mics don't get.
We tried an RE20 on the bass drum last time, but I didn't really like it that much when I heard it so we went back to a D112.
Live, our guy likes to use a 91 inside, and any number of mics at the hole outside. I like my D6, or D112 best.
A Beta 52 is OK (have one of those too), but most "in house" FOH people make it too "boofy" sounding to me. Not sure if others feel that way, but...
It's an "easy" mic, it just doesn't have the clarity I prefer when I hear it used.
Here's some pics:
The straight on pic with the sub mic you can see the foam through the front head.
The angled is the 16x24 and I took the pic while that RE20 was in the hole a little. I can't remember what the second mic model is (someone knows).
They even used the RE20 on the snare, but I can't remember if that was just to try something out or, if it was what we used on that session.
 

Attachments

  • 17903658_1765028030190869_7161524277299556687_n.jpg
    17903658_1765028030190869_7161524277299556687_n.jpg
    75.5 KB · Views: 5
  • 68354547_2967331943293799_7613382169896943616_n.jpg
    68354547_2967331943293799_7613382169896943616_n.jpg
    81.7 KB · Views: 5
  • 68243512_2967332096627117_389277878451175424_n.jpg
    68243512_2967332096627117_389277878451175424_n.jpg
    86.6 KB · Views: 5
  • 17883572_1765028140190858_3355584517454220778_n.jpg
    17883572_1765028140190858_3355584517454220778_n.jpg
    77.8 KB · Views: 5

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
I realized that after 40 years of playing, I knew nothing. Here's what's changed in the last 5 since being on this forum.
- My kit shrunk by three toms and four cymbals - Didn't realize I'd not only not miss them, but end up actually hating the extra bulk
- 2 ply to single ply coated head conversion
- learned not to dent heads before above conversion
- Thinner cymbals are not only more versatile, but a heck of a lot easier to control.
- Metal snares are amazing
- I learned how to tune
- I learned I needed lessons....bad
- I hated Gretsch for never changing and wouldn't give them a second look. Now, I get why.
- I never had much use for the double bas I clung to for so long. Not that it had no use, but I got far better focusing on bringing in hat chicks and independence than ever trying to get faster on double pedals.
- I thought I understood finesse. Knew nothing of finesse till I changed to single ply heads and thinner cymbals. Probably still don't.
- Tune Bot is awesome and taught me how to tune, now don't need it as much and drums sound fantastic.
- Just tune by ear has no value if you have no foundation or understanding to work from.
- Different woods sound different, but not as much as marketing says.
- Different bearing edges sound way different than the marketing says.
- This place caused me GAS.
- This place killed my GAS.
There's more, but that's all I remember for now. All came about from reading this forum and experimenting.

Wow, so much good stuff here.
 

Cmdr. Ross

Silver Member
The Billie Jean beat is harder to play than most people think. Yes I can play it, but I have difficulty staying focused due to how simple it is to play so I have to really focus to play it clean (not dragging or rushing) all the way through.
That's a great time check exercise. If you can get through it without rushing or dragging, you're doing pretty well.
 
Top