What bearing Edges?

iontheable

Senior Member
Hey Guys!!

So! A lot has happened recently I actually ended up selling my 6-piece Mapex Meridian kit and trimmings over the past couple weeks due to financial hardship and lack of time/space.

However! Someone was looking out for me because I ended up finding a 24x14 Keller Shell in perfect condition- for an amount I could not resist snatching up!

I've still got a 14x8 snare that I made and I'm looking to match the finish I've done to the snare on the 24" bass.

My question is, what kind of bearing edge should I have on it? I understand the basics of how the edges effect the sound, however I am unsure of what a good match for this bass would be- seeing as it's a pretty uncommon size(I think!)

Also, on an even further long shot, anyone know where around the Boston, MA area I could get it cut? I don't feel like learning on this gem of a find :)

Thanks!
 

Stroman

Platinum Member
24x14 is/was actually a quite common size - good find!!

Personally, I would have a good 30 degree edge with roundover put on it. That edge seems to bring out the shell in a bass drum.

As for someone in your area, I can't help, but a number of companies do edges. Shipping costs can be high, though.
 

porter

Platinum Member
24x14" was actually pretty common back in the day, and it's arguably a more versatile drum than a deeper one would be. Great size, IMO!

As for edges, it all depends. To get a lot of shell resonance (what the audience really hears, as opposed to head resonance) you probably want something that's not the average double 45. I'd go with a full round on the batter and maybe a half-round on the resonant side (not an expert, but this is what usually comes up in these kinds of discussions)- that'll give a nice thump with excellent head vibration transference from what I understand. Again, not an expert- that's pretty much just what I hear.
 
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iontheable

Senior Member
Awesome guys, thanks for the heads up!

I'm super stoked about it!

I knew they were more popular "back in the day" but I'm hoping to create a nice deep, punchy sound.

Just have to figure out a way to get some edges and I'll be good to go!
 

CreeplyTuna

Silver Member
45 and 30 degree edges are the most common. In short, 30 is supposed to have more shell sound where 45 is more heads. Once the experts show up, you'll get a better description haha.

Any pics? I'd love to see the matching snare and bass.
 

jodgey4

Silver Member
Another vote for something like a full roundover on the batter, and a rounded thirty on the reso would be great. Rounder edges also means you can probably get away with no muffling other than a built in ring like a PS3 on the batter and a full reso if you like the full 'boom' sound. Or just wait until Andy shows up, and do exactly what he says. Exactly. EXACTLY.
 

mrmike

Silver Member
I don't think a double 45 is a bad way to go. It's seems to be an all purpose edge that works very well. I guess a full round over does give more shell to head contact and more of a vintage vibe but not necessarily better for everything. Not sure a 45 is going to be a whole lot different than a 30 either.
 

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porter

Platinum Member
Not sure a 45 is going to be a whole lot different than a 30 either.
Certainly true if they're both just doubles with a sharp edge. I suppose the double 45 is the way to go if you want head sustain, but head sustain doesn't carry very far.
 

iontheable

Senior Member
Here's a company that many people say fine things about. They will do your edges. You have to strip the drum and send it to them.

http://www.precisiondrum.com/

They are in NY.
I'd love to have them do it but I think it'd be way too much. $88 for bearing edges seems insane to me, but I don't have much experience. When I had my snare shell made they did the edges for free.

On top of the $88 I'd be looking at even more in shipping and my budget drum isn't so any more.
 

porter

Platinum Member
I'd love to have them do it but I think it'd be way too much. $88 for bearing edges seems insane to me, but I don't have much experience. When I had my snare shell made they did the edges for free.

On top of the $88 I'd be looking at even more in shipping and my budget drum isn't so any more.
$88 does seem like a lot, but your snare edges were probably free because they work in the price of them into the total price of the shell and claim the edges are free as a value-add. My builder does edges for something like $30 per drum, so I think you can find a better price.
 

iontheable

Senior Member
Agreed. I'm going to call/email some places and see if anyone knows someone within 75 miles of me (ha)

And if that doesn't work, I might have some luck finding a shop with a good router that I can mess with..

Picked up the shell today:


Here's the temporary situation:
 

opentune

Platinum Member
I'd love to have them do it but I think it'd be way too much. $88 for bearing edges seems insane to me, but I don't have much experience. When I had my snare shell made they did the edges for free.

On top of the $88 I'd be looking at even more in shipping and my budget drum isn't so any more.
There's more to think about yet - , lugs, spurs, hoops, heads. A bare Keller shell may be cheap but making it into a full on bass drum might not be.

Nice shell though.
 

mrmike

Silver Member
I would think that any major U.S city would have at least a couple of options for having edges done.
 

porter

Platinum Member
There's more to think about yet - , lugs, spurs, hoops, heads. A bare Keller shell may be cheap but making it into a full on bass drum might not be.

Nice shell though.
Agreed on that, too... you can get some cheap Asian die-cast stuff and spend a couple hundred, or get some nice aluminum stuff (Ego drum supply makes 'em good) and spend a couple more. Either way: not cheap!
 

Andy

Administrator
Staff member
Another vote for something like a full roundover on the batter, and a rounded thirty on the reso would be great. Rounder edges also means you can probably get away with no muffling other than a built in ring like a PS3 on the batter and a full reso if you like the full 'boom' sound. Or just wait until Andy shows up, and do exactly what he says. Exactly. EXACTLY.
Hmmm, I'd never want anyone to do exactly as I say, especially on their own instrument. Advising in isolation is always dangerous.

I do like your edges suggestion though. Sound logic there, & pleasing to see :) A full roundover to the batter head works very well on a resonant shell. In the case of a Keller shell, this means using low mass hardware. Adding a ton of mass to the drum somewhat defeats the idea of driving vibrations into the shell via increased head contact, although it does put the brakes on the head quite nicely.

A moden sound requires a certain "wetness", & that means a sharper peak in there somewhere.

Not sure a 45 is going to be a whole lot different than a 30 either.
agreed, especially on edges with no roundover. It's how sharp the peak is that makes the difference. compared to peak radii, relief & counter cut angle are largely irrelevant, although much marketing hype is usually attached.

$88 for bearing edges seems insane to me, but I don't have much experience. When I had my snare shell made they did the edges for free.
For someone to route a double 45 degree & a quick sand, yes, that's at the higher end of competitive, but for someone to really spend time crafting good edges, especially hybrid edges (more setup), that's not unreasonable. When we cut bass drum edges in production, when you factor all the drum sanding, hand sanding, checking, waxing, etc, it's about 3 hours work, & that doesn't include setup.
 

iontheable

Senior Member
For someone to route a double 45 degree & a quick sand, yes, that's at the higher end of competitive, but for someone to really spend time crafting good edges, especially hybrid edges (more setup), that's not unreasonable. When we cut bass drum edges in production, when you factor all the drum sanding, hand sanding, checking, waxing, etc, it's about 3 hours work, & that doesn't include setup.
Wow! Thanks for putting that into perspective, I had no idea it would take someone that long. The rates seem a lot more reasonable now. However, it's still about a 5 hour one way drive.

And to everyone exclaiming the expenses of the hardware, I completely understand that. That's why I'm trying to save on the bearing edges (and wherever I can)

Thanks to everyone's suggestions- hopefully someone might see this thread that knows of an artisan more local to me. I have been striking out on google.
 

Andy

Administrator
Staff member
Wow! Thanks for putting that into perspective, I had no idea it would take someone that long.
The amount of time it takes to cut edges varies hugely. For a quick double 45/30 degree cut & sand to finish with everything set up, it can be minutes per edge (usually, in a production setting), for someone to really spend time, it can be hours. It's all in the finishing, setup, cutting speeds. Cutting down depth adds considerably to that too, especially ensuring a square cut on a bass drum. We lathe our square cuts.
 

iontheable

Senior Member
The amount of time it takes to cut edges varies hugely. For a quick double 45/30 degree cut & sand to finish with everything set up, it can be minutes per edge (usually, in a production setting), for someone to really spend time, it can be hours. It's all in the finishing, setup, cutting speeds. Cutting down depth adds considerably to that too, especially ensuring a square cut on a bass drum. We lathe our square cuts.
Awesome KISS! Great information.

Out of curiosity, you wouldn't happen to know anyone stateside, closest to Boston that offers this service?

Thanks again
 
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