What Artist did you worship, but no longer listen too?

someguy01

Well-known member
Pantera. Not because of anything musical, but Vinnie was a big early influence on me and it's just sad to think about him and Darryl. At least the brothers are together again.
 

NouveauCliche

Senior Member
Oh this is a fun Question.

To be honest I have a whole Genre:

Jazz.

I grew up obsessed and spent a decade playing it exclusively....Chick Corea, Al DiMeola, etc - and now I have the absolutely hardest time making myself sit down and l-i-s-t-e-n to a record.

I think part of it is because when it comes to Jazz I find it very studious - so when I have a great recording on - it takes like 100% of my focus.

When I throw on something like synth pop or whatever - I can almost tune it out and just enjoy whatever else it is that I'm doing.

There's still some classics I can toss on - Miles, Brubeck...but when it comes to like the above mentioned artists or their projects or newer jazz players...I just don't have the time and the energy to put into listening hard.

The big exception to that was when I was touring - I'd always listen to heavies before I performed and drew a lot of inspiration...but not touring right now haha :)
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
I lived and breathed Rush/Peart for 4-5 years in the late 70s early 80s. Then I went 25 or more years before listening to them again. I realized Geddy Lee's voice is one of the most acquired tastes in music. Interestingly, I bought a lot of used CDs decades later that contained some Rush stuff from the middle of their catalog that I knew nothing about and it's not bad at all.

I think that Power Windows is Geddy's best bass playing album by far...
 

SomeBadDrummer

Well-known member
Oh this is a fun Question.

To be honest I have a whole Genre:

Jazz.

I grew up obsessed and spent a decade playing it exclusively....Chick Corea, Al DiMeola, etc - and now I have the absolutely hardest time making myself sit down and l-i-s-t-e-n to a record.

I think part of it is because when it comes to Jazz I find it very studious - so when I have a great recording on - it takes like 100% of my focus.

When I throw on something like synth pop or whatever - I can almost tune it out and just enjoy whatever else it is that I'm doing.

There's still some classics I can toss on - Miles, Brubeck...but when it comes to like the above mentioned artists or their projects or newer jazz players...I just don't have the time and the energy to put into listening hard.

The big exception to that was when I was touring - I'd always listen to heavies before I performed and drew a lot of inspiration...but not touring right now haha :)
Yeah, I hear you about simply turning off some of what used to thrill ya'. I feel the same way when listening to complex stuff like Billy Cobham...I'm always thinking how it is played in my mind instead of just enjoying it...so it does take 'effort'.

BTW, I just watched your video with DDAT and hope you don't mind but I thought others might enjoy it as well (particularly starting around 2:50 in...)...nice chops!

 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
Oh this is a fun Question.

To be honest I have a whole Genre:

Jazz.

I grew up obsessed and spent a decade playing it exclusively....Chick Corea, Al DiMeola, etc - and now I have the absolutely hardest time making myself sit down and l-i-s-t-e-n to a record.

I think part of it is because when it comes to Jazz I find it very studious - so when I have a great recording on - it takes like 100% of my focus.

When I throw on something like synth pop or whatever - I can almost tune it out and just enjoy whatever else it is that I'm doing.

There's still some classics I can toss on - Miles, Brubeck...but when it comes to like the above mentioned artists or their projects or newer jazz players...I just don't have the time and the energy to put into listening hard.

The big exception to that was when I was touring - I'd always listen to heavies before I performed and drew a lot of inspiration...but not touring right now haha :)
I feel that way about instrumental music in general.

It's fun to go watch in person but to listen to at home or in the car, it's difficult.

I used to buy all sorts of jazz fusion and rock instrumental albums to hear the great drummers on those albums.
But outside a very small handful, I look at those albums now and wonder why I ever bought them or listened to them.
I need to hear music with vocals. Even if I appreciate a long instrumental passage or the musicianship, the albums need some vocals somewhere to get me to really enjoy it. I have a few exceptions but not many.
 

blinky

Senior Member
I feel that way about instrumental music in general.

It's fun to go watch in person but to listen to at home or in the car, it's difficult.

I used to buy all sorts of jazz fusion and rock instrumental albums to hear the great drummers on those albums.
But outside a very small handful, I look at those albums now and wonder why I ever bought them or listened to them.
I need to hear music with vocals. Even if I appreciate a long instrumental passage or the musicianship, the albums need some vocals somewhere to get me to really enjoy it. I have a few exceptions but not many.
This is probably why I still listen to 70's progressive rock, lots of great vocals and melodies, but also some instrumental passages. Best of both worlds perhaps. For me that is.
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
I feel that way about instrumental music in general.

It's fun to go watch in person but to listen to at home or in the car, it's difficult.

I used to buy all sorts of jazz fusion and rock instrumental albums to hear the great drummers on those albums.
But outside a very small handful, I look at those albums now and wonder why I ever bought them or listened to them.
I need to hear music with vocals. Even if I appreciate a long instrumental passage or the musicianship, the albums need some vocals somewhere to get me to really enjoy it. I have a few exceptions but not many.

I am the opposite...I have tons albums - old and new - with vocals on them that I still don't know the words to b/c I can't get past the great playing. My friend and I were talking about that the other day. Off the top of my head, I can think of a few Fates Warning albums that I can hum or play the instrumental parts from memory, but couldn't even begin to recite the words to.

It is interesting how different brains latch on to different things.
 

someguy01

Well-known member
I need to hear music with vocals.
+1 for sure.
My love of lyrics comes from my love of hip hop. I was always fascinated by the messages that people didn't hear from Chuck D or Jurassic 5. All the nuggets of truth from Masta Ace and Brother Ali.
So much truth about life, struggle, oppression, love, and pain out there if you listen.
 

NouveauCliche

Senior Member
Yeah, I hear you about simply turning off some of what used to thrill ya'. I feel the same way when listening to complex stuff like Billy Cobham...I'm always thinking how it is played in my mind instead of just enjoying it...so it does take 'effort'.

BTW, I just watched your video with DDAT and hope you don't mind but I thought others might enjoy it as well (particularly starting around 2:50 in...)...nice chops!


Oh that's funny - yea that's me. FYI about 60lbs ago ?

I wrote that song for one of the most beautiful woman I'd ever seen up in Nanaimo haha - star crossed lovers kind of thing. (Hey Candace if you're reading this)

Thanks for sharing and fun fact: That's Jimmy Cobb's set that he let me use. :) Not long before he passed.

Here's a recent video too with better audio (no solos haha) - I wrote the second tune called "EmDee"

 
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DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
I am the opposite...I have tons albums - old and new - with vocals on them that I still don't know the words to b/c I can't get past the great playing. My friend and I were talking about that the other day. Off the top of my head, I can think of a few Fates Warning albums that I can hum or play the instrumental parts from memory, but couldn't even begin to recite the words to.

It is interesting how different brains latch on to different things.

But seeing Fates Warning live is sow awesome when you have a huge room full of people all screaming
"Parallel lives running parallel with YOU
To the point where our horizons divide
My opinion is just a point of view
And your position is the other side"

Ray Alder is such a great singer, and Matheos is a great lyric writer.

But I'm certainly not saying I know every line of every song I love. Nor does every song I love have to have good lyrics, But I've always been fascinated by good lyric writing.

To me, the lyrics were always a part of why I loved Fates Warning, Queensryche, early Dream Theater, and, of course, Rush.
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
But seeing Fates Warning live is sow awesome when you have a huge room full of people all screaming
"Parallel lives running parallel with YOU
To the point where our horizons divide
My opinion is just a point of view
And your position is the other side"

Ray Alder is such a great singer, and Matheos is a great lyric writer.

But I'm certainly not saying I know every line of every song I love. Nor does every song I love have to have good lyrics, But I've always been fascinated by good lyric writing.

To me, the lyrics were always a part of why I loved Fates Warning, Queensryche, early Dream Theater, and, of course, Rush.

other than Rush, the lyrics became, or become a second level love....in a way....now that i think about, the words I usually remember the most are the ones being delivered during great vocal execution moments mnay times....where how they did it got me more than what they were saying.

man, I miss seeing FW, Rush DT and QR live....
 

SomeBadDrummer

Well-known member
I feel that way about instrumental music in general.

It's fun to go watch in person but to listen to at home or in the car, it's difficult.

I used to buy all sorts of jazz fusion and rock instrumental albums to hear the great drummers on those albums.
But outside a very small handful, I look at those albums now and wonder why I ever bought them or listened to them.
I need to hear music with vocals. Even if I appreciate a long instrumental passage or the musicianship, the albums need some vocals somewhere to get me to really enjoy it. I have a few exceptions but not many.
Jeff Beck
 

AlexNillson89

New member
I used to listen to metalica 24/7, I really could not stop listening to them, because they seemed to me to be bugs, but over time, I listened to them less and less and now I just can't get myself to turn on their song
 

LinearDrummer

Silver Member
Was on a obsessive hardcore Mike Portnoy Dream Theater kick for most of all the the 90's.

Those CDs have been collecting dust since 2000 ?
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
I used to listen to metalica 24/7, I really could not stop listening to them, because they seemed to me to be bugs, but over time, I listened to them less and less and now I just can't get myself to turn on their song

I recently found on Youtube a muti-camera professional recording of the 1st Metallica concert I ever attended in 1989 on Youtube.

I assume it was filmed but never used for what became the Binge and Purge box set.

I forgot how much I used to love Metallca.
 

theseer2

Junior Member
U2

Bonos preaching and then hanging out with the establishment is what did it.

I still like the early stuff though.
 
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