What are you using to lube pedal bearings?

JimmyM

Platinum Member
Easy! Sealed bearings, I picked up 2 and used on a 3000 dbl pedal. 2 screws to remove the heel plate, then 4 screws under that.
In fact, I even changed out the heel plate for the 5000 model ones which are more stout & feel better.
Am I mistaking the bearings for something else? I was thinking that they were in the top piece that holds the beaters.
 

someguy01

Platinum Member
Am I mistaking the bearings for something else? I was thinking that they were in the top piece that holds the beaters.
SP213 and SP010 are the bearings.
 

C. Dave Run

Gold Member
Am I mistaking the bearings for something else? I was thinking that they were in the top piece that holds the beaters.
Some pedals also have bearings at the heel plate hinge. Instead of having an actual hinge that connects the footboard/heel plate, the two parts nest and a pin runs through them. Those (not all) have bearings.

Bearings can also be found on spring perches and driveshafts depending on the pedal.
 

1 hit wonder

Well-known Member
After tearing down, cleaning and lubing an Iron Cobra double pedal, I kept hearing a squeak. It was the U joints. Friction from dry parts.
 

alparrott

Platinum Member
To answer the OP, I use bike chain/pedal oil. Similar function for similar parts.
 

AzHeat

Platinum Member
I haven't ben able to tear into the pedal any since I got it. It's a lefty double. I had plans to take it all apart to make it a righty, but to my surprise, Yamaha seems to have stopped universally drilling them, so no holes to make the conversion. Great Flying Dragon pedal. Nice and clean, but I won't get to use it, so no point in taking it all apart at this point. Will look to sell it and continue the endless hunt for a clean Flying Dragon in chain drive. Will have pictures up on our for sale section shortly.
 

vyacheslav

Senior Member
Tri-Flow is my lubricant of choice. Like others have mentioned abut Teflon, Tri-Flow contains Teflon. It cleans and lubricates. The more it lubricates, the more it cleans. I've used it on modern pedals and vintage Speed Kings. One of the benefits of Tri Flow and it's Teflon is that it will clean any old gunk from a previous lubricant or dirt you couldn't' get to. I am always surprised on how well I think I've cleaned an old Speed King, only to have the Tri-Flow clean the bearings and springs better than I ever could.
 

wraub

Gold Member
Tri-Flow is my lubricant of choice. Like others have mentioned abut Teflon, Tri-Flow contains Teflon. It cleans and lubricates. The more it lubricates, the more it cleans. I've used it on modern pedals and vintage Speed Kings. One of the benefits of Tri Flow and it's Teflon is that it will clean any old gunk from a previous lubricant or dirt you couldn't' get to. I am always surprised on how well I think I've cleaned an old Speed King, only to have the Tri-Flow clean the bearings and springs better than I ever could.
Same here, it's great for bike stuff too.
 

prodigy4299

New Member
I am no expert on lubrication, but as a keen cyclist and inline skater know a thing or two. I am seeing some pretty big no-no's being recommended in this thread, so I'll offer my two cents:

1) If you want to relube your bearings, you need to take them out clean them and then relube them. Mixing two lubes (whatever was on from the factory and whatever you decide to put on) without cleaning first will almost invariably lead to less smooth operation.

2) Cleaning bearings can be finicky. A small piece of dust gets into the system, and you'll feel it in the operation.

3) If possible (depending on the bass drum model), I'd just replace the bearings. Buy something like the ILQ7 or ILQ9, and they should be even smoother than what got shipped from the factory.

Again, no expert, just a guy with some experience lubing bike components and inline skate bearings.
 
Top