What are you doing drumwise during the lockdown?

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
The tom setup helps with the Stick Control exercises. 😉

What remote hat rig do you use?
None right now. I've decided to abandon it for a while actually. My double pedal gets tons of work at the moment.

I've looked at them all. I'm honestly not sure which one id buy. It's a pedal and a cable, are any of them really better than the others? I supposed I'd probably end up getting the Pearl version just so it matches.
 

AzHeat

Platinum Member
A friend gave me a list of covers (60) they have been playing at gigs, so I can fill in when their drummer can’t. While I’ve generally shied away from most classic rock cover tunes, I’m actually discovering the mastery in some of them. Literally songs I’ve never enjoyed have much more to them now that I am dissecting them. Some are actually way more fun than I thought. Other things I’ve been working on are independence exercises and getting the left hand to be more fluid. I’ve actually been working on the last two for quite a while, but have had more time to focus on them.
 

Woolwich

Silver Member
My intent was to set up the pad I bought several years ago and never used to look at rudiments for the first time in my life. I found a great video on the double stroke roll that when I had a quick try at totally exposed the lack of technique and weakness of my left hand.

The reality is that I have to at least attempt to do my day job from home for the bulk of the day. It can't really be done so everyone is focusing on self development etc and feeding back what we've done to our managers to demonstrate we're not sitting idle, I'm not complaining, I'm getting paid unlike many others. Then when 4 o'clock comes around I have to show willing with the house work and DIY to keep my wife happy because she's climbing the walls. We're in the first full week of active social distancing and unless everyone in the house can adapt and take a new way of thinking on (this is the new reality, we've got to learn to be bored, to slow down, to put things off because there's plenty of time to do them later) then however long we're social distancing for I can't see me being any further on technique wise by the end of it.
 

cbphoto

Gold Member
I've looked at them all. I'm honestly not sure which one id buy. It's a pedal and a cable, are any of them really better than the others? I supposed I'd probably end up getting the Pearl version just so it matches.
About five years ago, I worked to incorporate the SPD-SX into my kit, but its placement anywhere except on my left side felt awkward. My hi-hat was in the way unless I mounted the pad well above it. It felt like the Eye of Sauron with dreadlocks (cables). When Tama came out with their latest edition of their remote hat, I went for it and have spent the last 18 months getting used to the placement of the hats.

A cable remote will never be as quick as a hi-hat stand. Eighth notes are still possible, but at higher tempos it's sluggish. Since I place mine in front of the snare (I got the idea from Bill Bruford's setup) I use the short cable (1 meter) and it's better than the longer cable (used for placing the hats on the opposite side of the kit).

In Bruford's autobiography he mentions that placing the hats centered in front of the snare eliminated the descending tom setup. This helped mitigate his reliance on descending tom fills. This intrigued me and helps me explore other patterns on the toms.
 

Icetech

Gold Member
Sadly the lockdown hasn't changed a thing for me.. still working 70 hours a week and then home alone... drumming 2-4 hours a night as usual :)
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
About five years ago, I worked to incorporate the SPD-SX into my kit, but its placement anywhere except on my left side felt awkward. My hi-hat was in the way unless I mounted the pad well above it. It felt like the Eye of Sauron with dreadlocks (cables). When Tama came out with their latest edition of their remote hat, I went for it and have spent the last 18 months getting used to the placement of the hats.

A cable remote will never be as quick as a hi-hat stand. Eighth notes are still possible, but at higher tempos it's sluggish. Since I place mine in front of the snare (I got the idea from Bill Bruford's setup) I use the short cable (1 meter) and it's better than the longer cable (used for placing the hats on the opposite side of the kit).

In Bruford's autobiography he mentions that placing the hats centered in front of the snare eliminated the descending tom setup. This helped mitigate his reliance on descending tom fills. This intrigued me and helps me explore other patterns on the toms.
This is new for me this year. As a metal drummer in need to do blast beats. I wanted to be able to do them from either side with either hand. I have two sets of hats and two stands and could have had one either side, but thought one in the center was a simpler idea. I put a ride either side of it and it's a super fast open handed kit. My whole drumming life has been faster/longer/harder. As my journey continues my kit keeps getting smaller and more compact to accommodate this.IMG_20200123_144714.jpg

Please excuse the awful photo. I'm really not good at taking pictures. Weird as my mom was a photographer/journalist.
 

cbphoto

Gold Member
This is new for me this year. As a metal drummer in need to do blast beats. I wanted to be able to do them from either side with either hand. I have two sets of hats and two stands and could have had one either side, but thought one in the center was a simpler idea. I put a ride either side of it and it's a super fast open handed kit. My whole drumming life has been faster/longer/harder. As my journey continues my kit keeps getting smaller and more compact to accommodate this.
Open-handed all the time! Nice. That’s a dream I once had.

Please excuse the awful photo. I'm really not good at taking pictures. Weird as my mom was a photographer/journalist.
All you had to do was hold still and smile. All your life. 😂
 

Spreggy

Silver Member
Working on songs for a fusion band.

But the biggy is making a proper run at playing jazz, that's where I'm spending the most time. I'd gotten close many times, but always got turned away from it for one lousy excuse or another. But now I'm committed, and making good progress.
I'm using John Riley's Art of Bop Drumming, Peter Erskine's Essential Drum Fills, and Jazz Standards for Drumset by Brian Fullen. Great books, highly recommend.
 

WhoIsTony?

Member
Working on songs for a fusion band.

But the biggy is making a proper run at playing jazz, that's where I'm spending the most time. I'd gotten close many times, but always got turned away from it for one lousy excuse or another. But now I'm committed, and making good progress.
I'm using John Riley's Art of Bop Drumming, Peter Erskine's Essential Drum Fills, and Jazz Standards for Drumset by Brian Fullen. Great books, highly recommend.
please hit me up if you have any questions at all.

not saying you will even ever have an issue or question ... I just love helping people with things I happen to have experience and knowledge in.

plus I know that learning to play jazz out of a book can be difficult and misleading

plus I have some time on my hands and love talking shop

One thing I found that has really helped many people who are learning jazz coming from a rock background (not sure if you do but I did) is playing everything you are practicing as if a baby is sleeping in the next room and you do not want to wake it ...without losing intensity.

this will pay off in a big way later on
 
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Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
This is new for me this year. As a metal drummer in need to do blast beats. I wanted to be able to do them from either side with either hand. I have two sets of hats and two stands and could have had one either side, but thought one in the center was a simpler idea. I put a ride either side of it and it's a super fast open handed kit. My whole drumming life has been faster/longer/harder. As my journey continues my kit keeps getting smaller and more compact to accommodate this.View attachment 91219

Please excuse the awful photo. I'm really not good at taking pictures. Weird as my mom was a photographer/journalist.
I had my set up like this 2-3 years ago for a long time, to work on different fill ideas, as well as different beat ideas. I had more toms - in a symmetrical array on with side of the "subdivision/groove center", which is what I called the snare - hihat area in the middle. I actually had my snare centered, my HH just to the left in front of the snare, and my ride just to the right in front of the snare.

It was awesome to use to play along to stuff I had been doing in a traditional set up for years...like re-learning the set. In my surf punk band, I still use this set up because I wrote a bunch of songs using it, and like the feel. It totally f's with sound guys though..."uh...where do I put the snare mic?"
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
I had my set up like this 2-3 years ago for a long time, to work on different fill ideas, as well as different beat ideas. I had more toms - in a symmetrical array on with side of the "subdivision/groove center", which is what I called the snare - hihat area in the middle. I actually had my snare centered, my HH just to the left in front of the snare, and my ride just to the right in front of the snare.

It was awesome to use to play along to stuff I had been doing in a traditional set up for years...like re-learning the set. In my surf punk band, I still use this set up because I wrote a bunch of songs using it, and like the feel. It totally f's with sound guys though..."uh...where do I put the snare mic?"
Three months in and I'm totally digging it. It transfers from the pad real easy, and the rides/snare/hats location makes it so easy to go between any of the three (4 in my case).

Never thought about the sound guy. Not my problem!
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
I place my snare mic under the hats and the bleed isn't any worse than when the mic pokes in from the 10 o’clock location and the hats are at the 7 o’clock area.
yeah... a lot of the guys around here like the mic to be perpendicular. to the head, with the mic face an inch right above the head...no change, no explaining or adding suggestions...it is that way, or no mic at all. No ticking the mic underneath anything...a lot of the time, it is a "smile and nod" moment...and then I just tweak the mic when they go to the guitars...
 

cbphoto

Gold Member
yeah... a lot of the guys around here like the mic to be perpendicular. to the head, with the mic face an inch right above the head...no change, no explaining or adding suggestions...it is that way, or no mic at all. No ticking the mic underneath anything...a lot of the time, it is a "smile and nod" moment...and then I just tweak the mic when they go to the guitars...
Here’s a decent rundown of mic positioning on a snare drum. The sound of a close-mic’d snare doesn’t provide the full Sonics of the drum; the snappy sound is muted. The overheads provide a much better image for my amateur recordings.
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
Here’s a decent rundown of mic positioning on a snare drum. The sound of a close-mic’d snare doesn’t provide the full Sonics of the drum; the snappy sound is muted. The overheads provide a much better image for my amateur recordings.
yep...for live, I just use an SM57, set at an angle to the drum, usually placed between the 2 toms...like underneath them. Not in the way, and always works. Been doing it this way for 25+ years...
 
During the C-event, I am restoring and Re-wrapping a 1967 Ludwig 14'' x 24'' Pink Champagne Sparkle Bass Drum. It was Very badly Drilled at the Ludwig Factory. It must have been a Friday, pissed-off Worker, High/Drunk who the hell knows. The Rail-mount Tom Holder is 4 inches too Far to the left, The L-arm Cymbal Mount is 3 inches too far to the Right. Even the Air Hole Keystone Badge was Misaligned and Not centered. But when done with Hoops sanded and repainted, New PCS Wrap, it will look NEW.
 

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Spreggy

Silver Member
please hit me up if you have any questions at all.

not saying you will even ever have an issue or question ... I just love helping people with things I happen to have experience and knowledge in.

plus I know that learning to play jazz out of a book can be difficult and misleading

plus I have some time on my hands and love talking shop

One thing I found that has really helped many people who are learning jazz coming from a rock background (not sure if you do but I did) is playing everything you are practicing as if a baby is sleeping in the next room and you do not want to wake it ...without losing intensity.

this will pay off in a big way later on
Hey thanks man! I really appreciate it, and I'll holler as needed!
 

AxisDrummer

Senior Member
I'm a manager at a supermarket so I've barely touched my drums in the last few weeks until this past weekend.

I'm working 70+ hours and then my wife is working from home while attempting to go over schoolwork with my young daughter......The last thing she wants to hear is drums.

I need to haul my drums to the upstairs offices at my store and play there when we close at 10 PM.
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
1. Morello Stone Killer exercise, all kinds of variations

2. The money beat, very slow, no fills, really listening to the sound.

3. Half-time shuffles, all speeds, but mainly very slow, really listening to sound and groove
 
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