What about Birch? Who make the best birch kits?

Kumu-Pekka

Junior Member
Lee-Bro, I want to thank you pointing out that odd photo of my Kumu Original shell bearing edge! I haven't noticed that before and I really don't know why. That drum is on use and I can tell that it is perfectly all right, no ply separation. To me that photo looks very bad indeed, you are right it doesn't give a good impression of my quality. I took those photos by myself some years ago, I hope I'm not so dumb that I took a photo of a ply separation. It must be those technical issues in pixels or something like that. Anyway, I'm really glad that this came out, I have to be even more precise in checking all small things on my website.

Kumu-Pekka / Kumu Drums
 

kevinmac

Senior Member
I have no clue who makes the "best" now, but it saddens me to se birch being so much out of favor for most companies, usually they put the all-birch kits into the low-end category, if at all. Seems like every now and then, some all-birch lines will show up, and will disappear in about a year or 2 (like my BCX). I suppose it's all about the demand, and it's easier to remove the birch lines if people have a general consumption that maple is the best wood for drums anyway, and they got lower and lower in price.... I like Yamaha drums in general and I know they were big on high-end birch kits, but I really think their newer ones are way too pricey for what you actually get. If you look at competitors like Tama, Pearl, and to a certain degree, Mapex, look at how much you get for the money in comparison. But that is another discussion I guess. I really like the sound of my Pearl Masters BCX though, even though there clearly are better drums out there. But I guess I am in a minority for prefering Die-Cast hoops, I just feel they are more rigid and stay in tune better, but I might be wrong. I would put Yamaha Recording Customs and Sonor SQ2 up there for best all birch kits of today.
Don’t think Yamaha Recording Customs, Pearl MasterWorks Reference, DW Collector series, Sonor SQ2, are low end!
 

petrez

Senior Member
Don’t think Yamaha Recording Customs, Pearl MasterWorks Reference, DW Collector series, Sonor SQ2, are low end!
If you read through my post, I didn't say the ones you list there is low end. I said (or meant, if it was unclear) a lot of manufacturers puts their all birch kits in the low end category (like Yamaha Stage Custom, or the older Tama Silverstar, Pearl Vision, Mapex Mars) and dont offer much in the middle and higher end department. And apart from Recording Customs, all the kits you list there are custom order only (I might be wrong about DW's, but I am pretty sure you need to custom order them as well, at least with birch shells), and in a too high price department for the average drummer. Everything can be made in a custom order as long as you pay enough for it, it's just the lack of high end birch offerings for stock kits, compared with earlier years I was talking about.
 
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kevinmac

Senior Member
If you read through my post, I didn't say the ones you list there is low end. I said (or meant, if it was unclear) a lot of manufacturers puts their all birch kits in the low end category (like Yamaha Stage Custom, or the older Tama Silverstar, Pearl Vision, Mapex Mars) and dont offer much in the middle and higher end department. And apart from Recording Customs, all the kits you list there are custom order only (I might be wrong about DW's, but I am pretty sure you need to custom order them as well, at least with birch shells), and in a too high price department for the average drummer. Everything can be made in a custom order as long as you pay enough for it, it's just the lack of high end birch offerings for stock kits, compared with earlier years I was talking about.
”usually they put the all-birch kits into the low-end category, if at all.”
Your making a general statement that really does not correctly reflect the use of birch being used in low end market, weather custom or off the line. Ex: Yamaha RC’s are not custom and are 100% birch and not considered low end as was the Yamaha Birch Absolutes! There are kits that are maple that are priced below the so called high end kits! So to generalize and randomly say manufacturers use birch in their low end kits is just a false misrepresentation.
 

s1212z

Well-known member
I always wanted a birch kit but I always end up with something different, one of these days I suppose.

I didn't hear mention of the Canopus Birch Series in this thread, which I guess is essentially the Yaiba but with brass fittings. But like all their series, they are customizing shell thickness and bearing edge for each shell size. It sounds like they are using Japanese birch because they mention the softer qualities, porous quality compared to the tighter grain birch in the Europe/Americas.

I thought the new RCs sounded good but that birch shootout, not as much. Sounds like this birch variety is more lively and they have to manipulate the lug weights to make the sound more like a 'traditional' birch RC quality to dial it back but it sounded dead compared to the other. The original Starclassic birch must be collectors item by now and I never got a chance to check out the Yamaha Birch Absolutes. The SQ1 sound pretty amazing, never really paid attention to Sonor until I heard these.
 

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
Go to YouTube and look up Sakae Almighty Birch.

Grab some good headphones and a tissue because you'll be drooling as your mouth gapes open.
 

someguy01

Well-known member
Inexpensive or not, Premier Artist Birch are 100% birch shells and there's a kit on Reverb for $500USD and the XPKs like mine are birch and eucalyptus and can be had for under $500USD.
The Premiers are the first kit I've owned that wasn't a poplar mix or a maple mix and I can certainly hear the difference. (it's also the least expensive kit I've ever owned)
 
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