Well, the Grammys strike again

A

Anthony Amodeo

Guest
Can someone tell me the difference between record of the year and song of the year, with record being only one song and not an album.

Record of the year- Artist, producer, and engineer and/or mixer.
Song of the Year- goes to the composer and lyricist...meaning the song as written not its recording
 

larryz

Platinum Member
I know his first name is Jim
not sure what his last name is

my friends name is Warren Johnson but Jim is his step dad so they obviously don't have the same last name

Jim told me many years ago that he played on that song

he also told me that Billy Cobham was on the session ....doing what...I have no idea

he could be completely bulls***ing me but I don't think he has any reason to do anything like that

I know he was a session guy in the 1970s
Thanks for the info Anthony. Cobham was there? Hm. Funny how some drumming legends played on some crappy albums in the 1970s. The life of a session player I guess. I have a mid-70s Van McCoy album (the guy that did The Hustle) that credits list Steve Gadd as drummer :)
 

Anon La Ply

Renegade
Basically, on the whole, the listening public and the people in the industry are different. The best any of us can do is like what we like, and leave it at that.
This is a big issue to me - the friction between musicians' and the general public's taste. That's the reason why we so often play the same old crappy songs in the same old crappy ways and we're largely "not allowed" to play original music - to please the punters.

The public knows precious little of music and IMO their taste is, and has long been, abysmal. Think of the horrid sputum masquerading as "soul food" that's so long churned off the assembly lines for our "listening pleasure".

I first realised that the public were mostly musical morons in 1970 (I think) when Tony Orlando's awful Tie a Yellow Ribbon was #1 and Jud Strunk's execrable Daisy a Day was #2. I couldn't believe it. Sometimes decent songs get through, but for the most part the public continue to be dazzled by shiny baubles and reject gems that are not cut into a neat cube ...
 

opentune

Platinum Member
Music, being art, is not a competition. Keeping that in mind I am never upset at these award shows.

But its kind of a lark really. I mean if anybody off the street sang like Frank Ocean did, and made a song about Forrest Gump like Frank Ocean did, they would be laughed out of any record execs office. What would Prince say? What would Forrest gump say? lol

I did enjoy the final rap tune, (not a Trav Barker fan, but he sounded good) and off course great seeing Jay Bellerose's vintage drums again on the Levon Helm tribute
 

larryz

Platinum Member
I first realised that the public were mostly musical morons in 1970 (I think) when Tony Orlando's awful Tie a Yellow Ribbon was #1 and Jud Strunk's execrable Daisy a Day was #2. I couldn't believe it. Sometimes decent songs get through, but for the most part the public continue to be dazzled by shiny baubles and reject gems that are not cut into a neat cube ...
Hah, I didn't realize those songs made it all the way to the land down under (oops another Grammy Best New Artist..Men At Work!).

Yellow Ribbon was 1973, Daisy a Day was indeed 1970. Love both of them though. About once or twice a decade though.....
 

wsabol

Gold Member
I didn't see them, and I didn't know Ocean was going to do a Forrest Gump song. I love the movie, but I just looked at the lyrics for the song... sounds like it was awful to start with no matter how badly Frank Ocean choked on stage.

Weird Al's Gump song is pretty hard to beat though. Just saying :)
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
http://www.thedailymash.co.uk/news/arts-entertainment/end-of-music-announced-at-grammys-2013021259333

End of music announced at Grammys

At the close of the ceremony, host LL Cool J read out a collective statement from record label bosses stating that the music industry was being merged into advertising.

He said: “There is no money in this **** any more, except for sponsorship from fizzy pop companies.

“In the past, singers and instrument-players have followed their own wayward agenda, with values that could be described as ‘artistic’.

“However we now realise that ‘artistic’ values often do not serve the core brand values of fizzy pop makers.

“So we declare the music industry officially over. Henceforth it will be known as ‘soundvertising’.
 

inneedofgrace

Platinum Member
Today most of the Beatles songs would not have been recorded, let alone be hits on the radio. We were watching Simon and Garfunkel sing Bridge Over Troubled Water and The Boxer. The whole time I was thinking these guys would never have been stars in today's world of music.

Then again, maybe my parents were thinking that singers like Perry Como would never been stars in my era.
 

larryz

Platinum Member
I know his first name is Jim
not sure what his last name is

my friends name is Warren Johnson but Jim is his step dad so they obviously don't have the same last name

Jim told me many years ago that he played on that song

he also told me that Billy Cobham was on the session ....doing what...I have no idea

he could be completely bulls***ing me but I don't think he has any reason to do anything like that

I know he was a session guy in the 1970s

Well I dug up a copy of Starland's debut album and sure enough drumming on Afternoon Delight was credited to Jimmie Young. And Cobham did work on this album. Mystery solved. Until next time....
 

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