Weird problem (double bass pattern)

schist

Silver Member
Don't worry about the sound at a slow tempo; worry about the motion. If the motion isn't controlled at a slow tempo, it's not going to be controlled at a fast tempo either. At least give it a try.
I respectfully disagree. 190 is a 'slow tempo' for me with the ankle motion, and so far I'm actually seeing results. Any slower than that (give or take a few BPM), and it just doesn't work for me.
 

Duck Tape

Platinum Member
I can play these pretty good after some perseverance.

The best approach is to alternate the leading foot. By that I mean play:

RLR LRL RLR LRL

If you keep the right foot on the beat the whole time it will get tired after a couple of bars.

Also practice:

R LRL RLR LRL RL (repeat)

You get the sensation that you're playing doubles with each foot (and slipping a note in between them with the other foot). Your left foot will develop a slide technique if you keep this up and try and get some speed and power from it.
 

Servant

Junior Member
I respectfully disagree. 190 is a 'slow tempo' for me with the ankle motion, and so far I'm actually seeing results. Any slower than that (give or take a few BPM), and it just doesn't work for me.
Agree. Generally speaking, it is always better to perform everything at slower tempo first to gain control and then speed up. But in this particular case I think it's not really functional to practice ankle motion slower than 80 bpm. If I understood OP correctly, he's referring to ankle techniques with heels off the floor, same techniques that George Kollias, Tim Waterson and many other drummers use for fast double bass. Of course you can practice slower, but to go under 80 bpm I think it will have no benefits.
 

schist

Silver Member
Turns out it was a balance problem after all - leaning to one side/slumping and putting too much weight on the pedals. Take heed when guys like Derek Roddy tell you that posture is very important in extreme metal drumming ...
 

bud7h4

Silver Member
Hello again all,

Recently I've encountered a unique issue regarding playing, I guess you would call them,"gallop" double bass patterns (clusters of 3 16th-notes, usually RLR RLR etc.) By themselves, with no backbeat/hands on top, I can play them just fine, but once I start playing a backbeat, or a blast beat/whatever over it I no longer get that RLR RLR separation and it usually occurs that the left foot flams with the right foot . . . . . . .
What I would do is play very basic, abbreviated beats with the hands and increase the complexity gradually.

Second thing I would do is play this beat to music. Sometimes it helps to simply apply an excercise to music and not focus so intensely on the drum pattern. Doesn't really matter if it fits the music terribly well as long as the feel is there.
 
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schist

Silver Member
What I would do is play very basic, abbreviated beats with the hands and increase the complexity gradually.

Second thing I would do is play this beat to music. Sometimes it helps to simply apply an excercise to music and not focus so intensely on the drum pattern. Doesn't really matter if it fits the music terribly well as long as the feel is there.
See above post

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