Wear work gloves when setting up and tearing down

Not sure if this is a technique thing or not. But a few years ago I started wearing basic tighter-fitting work gloves during load in/setup and tear down/load out. I have a pair in the van and one in my trap case. It saves wear and tear on my hands immensely. I never realized the amount of pinched skin, blood blisters, grease and grime that accumulates until gloves made all that go away.

I always saw pro drum techs wearing them, and I figured it was to not smudge the drums/cymbals, but man does it ever save your hands.

Also a small technique I picked up from doing a few stagehand gigs... when pushing cases, always put your hands on TOP of the case, not the sides or corners. This saves you from smashing your fingers in doorways, against other cases etc.

People have made fun of me for the gloves but it's funny to see them show up with a pair later on saying "whoa this is way better!"

Anyway, random PSA here. The other thread about warming up made me think of this.
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
I always use two pairs: one for setting up and breaking down drums and hardware and one for handling cymbals. My cymbals are always my last items to be set up and my first to be taken down. I like to keep them clean, so they get their own gloves.
 

TK-421

Senior Member
I don't use gloves. But I do use one of these. It really helps with the wing nuts.

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That's why I exclusively use Yamaha stands, because I have never even once experienced a stuck or tight wing nut on any of them—even the two used stands I bought from a rehearsal studio that had their share of wear. Yet when I'm at gigs with shared kits, hourly studios and other situations where I'm forced to use other hardware, I routinely experience stuck wing nuts. From every brand except Yamaha. I'm not sure how they engineer their wing nuts, but they simply don't get stuck. Ever.

BTW, a few years ago I started wearing weightlifting gloves when loading in (as well using as a cart), and it really does help. With my heavy Renown kit, I need all the help I can get!
 

Morrisman

Platinum Member
That's why I exclusively use Yamaha stands, because I have never even once experienced a stuck or tight wing nut on any of them—even the two used stands I bought from a rehearsal studio that had their share of wear. Yet when I'm at gigs with shared kits, hourly studios and other situations where I'm forced to use other hardware, I routinely experience stuck wing nuts. From every brand except Yamaha. I'm not sure how they engineer their wing nuts, but they simply don't get stuck. Ever.

BTW, a few years ago I started wearing weightlifting gloves when loading in (as well using as a cart), and it really does help. With my heavy Renown kit, I need all the help I can get!
Yamaha wing nuts have a titanium thread. Seems excessive, but it works. I agree with your observation - so many shared kits and house kits seem to need a lot of force to stop them slipping. Mine are barely finger tight and never slip.
 

Yamaha Rider

Well-known member
Yamaha wing nuts have a titanium thread. Seems excessive, but it works. I agree with your observation - so many shared kits and house kits seem to need a lot of force to stop them slipping. Mine are barely finger tight and never slip.
Titanium? You sure? How does that work?
 

TK-421

Senior Member
Many times in rehearsal studios I've had to put a drumstick either side of a wing nut to get enough leverage to unstick it :-(
Yup, I have to do that all the time whenever the hardware is anything but Yamaha. I don’t know why other manufacturers can‘t figure out how to make their wing nuts not suck.
 

Jeremy Bender

Platinum Member
Gloves are a great idea in the right application. I used to wear light weight leather gloves for hauling gear in and out of planes, trucks and buses.

Yamaha hardware certainly is tough to beat. I love their cymbal stands.
 

wraub

Well-known member
Me neither. A good idea, regardless of activity, imo.
The hands are the tools that use the tools. ;)
 
Yeah having to undo overtightened wing nuts always super annoying for me. I never torque mine down and everything always holds, I dont understand why people overdo that.

"But you can undo them with that stick trick." ... and now my sticks are shaped like bananas.

I remember at one gig the opening act needed to play my kit. I told him "yeah man go ahead and adjust whatever you need. make yourself at home.... one weird request, I know... just please don't over tighten the wing nuts". After his set, sure enough he cranked them ALL down. I swear I was really polite about my request.
 
I never wear gloves but should.. 90 percent of my injuries in life have come from loading in gear and setting up haha. Sometimes before you get the the double stick leverage you push it to the point where you bruise a finger.. Hate that.
 

felonious69

Well-known member
I am a guitar player who just bought my first drum set. After seeing several drummers cleaning their kits over the years, I decided that before I even opened anything up I was gonna wash my hands and wear nitrile gloves. Same with the initial tuning. Didn't want to be polishing before I even get to play. This is officially my first set up (ever) so I never even considered wear and tear on my hands, but...good to know!
 

specgrade

Senior Member
I wear Mechanix Gloves. Great for dexterity and not heavy or bulky. They make for nice driving gloves in the winter. I just roll them up and put them in my coat pockets. They don't cost a lot either.
 

cbphoto

Gold Member
I’ve never considered wearing gloves for setup/teardown. Probably because my day job has me setting up/striking gear that requires dexterity (or, lately, digging into the dirt to move plants in a garden for a “better arrangement” while sweating like a pig). Regardless, please post links to gloves that work for y’all.
 
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