Was there a point where you stopped feeling like a faker?

Mastiff

Senior Member
I mean to keep this light, just a fun discussion.

Even though I've been hacking away for a long time, I never really tried very hard at drums until the last few years. I have some serious deficiencies, especially in hand technique (never did marching band or anything like that) that I'm trying to correct. Objectively, I'm probably an "intermediate" drummer, but my deficiencies make me always caveat my capabilities, because I know someone could easily ask me to play something that's not super advanced, that I could not do. It would be stressful to be on the spot and "found out" for not being able to do something that "all drummers worth their salt should be able to do".

I wonder, does this ever go away? Almost nobody can be good at everything. Even someone like Neil Peart, one of the best ever, could get thrust into a situation where it becomes apparent that he can't swing or improvise. Do you just get over it, or is there actually a threshold of capability where you are suddenly confident?
 

Mongrel

Silver Member
I mean to keep this light, just a fun discussion.

Even though I've been hacking away for a long time, I never really tried very hard at drums until the last few years. I have some serious deficiencies, especially in hand technique (never did marching band or anything like that) that I'm trying to correct. Objectively, I'm probably an "intermediate" drummer, but my deficiencies make me always caveat my capabilities, because I know someone could easily ask me to play something that's not super advanced, that I could not do. It would be stressful to be on the spot and "found out" for not being able to do something that "all drummers worth their salt should be able to do".

I wonder, does this ever go away? Almost nobody can be good at everything. Even someone like Neil Peart, one of the best ever, could get thrust into a situation where it becomes apparent that he can't swing or improvise. Do you just get over it, or is there actually a threshold of capability where you are suddenly confident?
Wait....

Did I just type this under someone else's name?!!!
 

J-Boogie

Gold Member
I think one can get to a point where they can play along musically with just about anything, even if its not authentic to the style. Thats what comforts me, Im a total faker, but a committed faker, who will continue to fake and doesn't fear his own fakeness. I am twice as musical as most drummers twice as technical as me...the faker in me tells myself that.

For me, being unschooled and self untaught, I think Ill always feel like a faker, but I dont fear it.
 

Mongrel

Silver Member
I think one can get to a point where they can play along musically with just about anything, even if its not authentic to the style. Thats what comforts me, Im a total faker, but a committed faker, who will continue to fake and doesn't fear his own fakeness. I am twice as musical as most drummers twice as technical as me...the faker in me tells myself that.

For me, being unschooled and self untaught, I think Ill always feel like a faker, but I dont fear it.
I like this ^ Siunds like a good idea for a Blu Oyster Cult tune....lol.

When your band and your fans love you and your biggest critcs are other drummers.....

Hmmmmmm....or maybe-there are drummers who play for other drummers and there are drummers who just play?

Something to think about anyway.

Lol
 

Mr Farkle

Well-known member
I think it’s an art thing. Many artists feel like they are faking it. I’m a photographer by trade but it’s only part of my income and it’s technical photography so I feel like a fake. It pays the bills and I still feel like a fake. 🤷‍♂️

Drum wise, over the past couple of years I switched to traditional grip. I know it’s completely personal and arbitrary but that along with honing in on some rudiments has made me feel less like a fake. Just a little.
 

gdmoore28

Gold Member
Yep, about fifteen years ago it suddenly dawned on me that I'm good at what I do - move a rock/pop band with authority. Don't know rudiments. Can't read music. I don't think I could even bluff my way through a solo. But I can propel a pop/rock/country band. I suck at what I can't do, but I'm good at what I do. That's where my confidence lies. And I don't feel bad or inferior because I can't do it all. And that feels good. End of story.

GeeDeeEmm
 

Mongrel

Silver Member
Yep, about fifteen years ago it suddenly dawned on me that I'm good at what I do - move a rock/pop band with authority. Don't know rudiments. Can't read music. I don't think I could even bluff my way through a solo. But I can propel a pop/rock/country band. I suck at what I can't do, but I'm good at what I do. That's where my confidence lies. And I don't feel bad or inferior because I can't do it all. And that feels good. End of story.

GeeDeeEmm
I tried to find a BIGGER thumbs up for your post. But I guess this one will have to do!
 

Juniper

Gold Member
Wouldn't say I feel like a faker but I've never stopped feeling underdeveloped and you know what?

I love that.

Means there is much to be improved on, more musicality to learn...etc

I'd rather be at the bottom of Mount Everest looking forward to the hard, long, journey ahead than be at the very top wondering what the hell I'm going to do next.
 

Chollyred

Senior Member
Hmmm...I marched in band, played in symphonic band and jazz bands, played in orchestras, and I can read music (slowly), know a bunch of rudiments, and generally find the rhythms and improv to a whole bunch of songs, but still feel like a faker, especially if I haven't learned the songs note for note. And I don't solo! Scares me to death!
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
for me, playing wise, it was 4 years ago when a local well known blues/jazz guitar guy asked me to stay in his band after some jamming. I had grown up playing punk/metal/rock, and just played to jazz in my room only b/c I did not feel like I had a "legit" jazz feel. Funny thing was that my first exposure to drums was jazz from my dad, who was a jazz drummer around town in the 60's.

I was surprised because he would call out a song, and I knew none of them...especially the blues stuff as I am not a real big blues fan...but now, having been exposed to it, I have learned some of the standard rep. The biggest moment was when he said he didn't hire me b/c of my rep knowledge, but because of my feel, and adaptability (and since I don't drink, it was instant designated driver).

teaching-wise, it was when my first batch of students started making college/DCI/WGI auditions. And then going into teaching themselves...the biggest one in that arena was when the son of my best friend, who I actually carried out to the car the day he was released to the hospital, became a student of mine in high school, and then went on to be successful in college band...

I still feel like I am a faker in many ways b/c there are some goals I haven't met...

I feel like I am never done learning, and never done acquiring knowledge. It is about the journey, not the destination. I rally don't want to find "the end" or the final thing that will make me feel like I am done
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
Hmmm...I marched in band, played in symphonic band and jazz bands, played in orchestras, and I can read music (slowly), know a bunch of rudiments, and generally find the rhythms and improv to a whole bunch of songs, but still feel like a faker, especially if I haven't learned the songs note for note. And I don't solo! Scares me to death!
pretty much me to a T plus I have a Music Ed. degree.... in fact I can't stand soloing...I get bored hearing myself do stuff like that...but I LOVE hearing someone else who is really good at it
 

danondrums

Well-known member
The problem with the question is that if someone were to give a serious answer then they would be implying that they are serious business on the drum kit.
 

TOMANO

Senior Member
The point, I believe, is to perform at the top of your abilities with a commitment to continual growth. If you are honest in your artistic expression and in an appropriate setting; you are not "faking. "
 

Mastiff

Senior Member
I said I was intermediate, not "half way to expert". Not the same. ;)

Maybe it gets to the crux of the question: "intermediate" is easy to achieve and is a huge range. Depending on how hard you judge yourself and your own level of self confidence, maybe you never leave. It takes nerve to call yourself "advanced" or "expert". Someone might call you out.
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
I think you also "call yourself out" if you lose sight of your true abilities.

The whole notion of defining intermediate/advanced etc. is pretty ambiguous...my students think I am advanced...Vinnie Coliauta would consider me "intermediate"...I personally feel like I am advanced at some concepts, and a beginner at others. But mostly, I feel like all of the concepts build and interact with each other. About 5 years ago, I quit trying to define myself as being at a certain level, but more as being proficient at certain elements of playing...
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
No.

When I was at PIT, the depressing thing was the more I learned, the more I learned how much I did not know..

You will never know it all, or even be able to play it all.

So, no the feeling doesn't go away. Though you may reach a point where you no longer care.
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
No.

When I was at PIT, the depressing thing was the more I learned, the more I learned how much I did not know..

You will never know it all, or even be able to play it all.

So, no the feeling doesn't go away. Though you may reach a point where you no longer care.
I've reached the point where I no longer care. Especially when I find out that virtually every pro I know, feels like their somewhat illegitimate in one way or another.

My only problem now is that I never run into people who test me. They all just assume I can do the things they ask for. And maybe 90% of the time, I can. But it's not anything people can't play. It's just stuff. Most people I work with are busy giving the hits to the people.
 

Morrisman

Platinum Member
When I see people playing in bands who can do a lot less than me, have a lot less knowledge or control than me, but still play OK and contribute to their band, I realise that I have learnt a bit over the years. Then I don’t feel like a fraud.

But then someone world class comes along and plays stuff I can’t begin to understand, and it puts me back in my place.
 

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
Never a faker, just learning.

There was a point where I at least understood basic technique, sound and dynamics enough to feel like the instrument weas part of me like my guitar or saxophone. It doesn't mean I can do everything, but I am in control and can intuitively adjust things to make something work. I could do that reasonably comfortably with a simple groove pretty early, but now I can improvise, adjust things easily and can do more "complex" grooves with relative ease, needing minutes not weeks to make them work.
 
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