Warning: Parental Advisory movie

wraub

Well-known member
I like movies.
 
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roncadillac

Member
Ok everyone, I appreciate the intelligent discussion about the topic of censorship especially in relation to this specific case and movie. However when topics of 'rights' and 'liberal vs conservative' come up that is a fast track to getting a thread shut down.

So, not to censor anyone (lol), but can we maybe not let this turn into a political opinion thread? I mainly wanted to see if anyone was familiar with this movie and where to find it, which was answered almost immediately.

Thanks dudes!
 
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wraub

Well-known member
I agree, here.
However, to think this subject is not overly twisted up with politics is to miss the crux of the biscuit.

Ok everyone, I appreciate intelligent the discussion about the topic of censorship especially in relation to this specific case and movie. However when topics of 'rights' and 'liberal vs conservative' come up that is a fast track to getting a thread shut down.

So, not to censor anyone (lol), but can we maybe not let this turn into a political opinion thread? I mainly wanted to see if anyone was familiar with this movie and where to find it, which was answered almost immediately.

Thanks dudes!
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Does anything like this exist outside the USA? Meaning, do other countries have advisory boards that put ratings on music which in turn limits the ability to purchase by some age groups? Some bands have been banned in other countries, but that's different. For example, I know Cannibal Corpse has been banned in many countries, but I dont believe metal itself has.
 

wraub

Well-known member
"The record industry first recognized a threat when the Parents Music Resource Center launched in April of 1985. The non-profit foundation got off the ground with $5000 from a musician -- Beach Boy Mike Love. The founders were prominent Washington women including Mary (Tipper) Gore (then wife of Senator Al Gore).

The PMRC compiled a list of 15 songs it deemed objectionable. Topping the list was Prince's "Darling Nikki," for its reference to masturbation. The story goes that Tipper Gore bought Purple Rain (the album containing "Darling Nikki") for her young daughter, who promptly pointed out the naughty bits.

The Washington wives used their connections (PMRC's founders included wives of 10 Senators, 6 Representatives, and a Cabinet Secretary) to leverage their cause. And they had some leverage -- it seems there was a bill that the music industry very much wanted to get through Congress. H.R. 2911 proposed a tax on tape recorders and blank cassettes as a way of collecting royalties (most of which would go to the labels) to offset the claimed losses that would result from home taping.

Just five months after the PMRC launched, the RIAA announced that record labels would put advisories on albums. But the PMRC rejected the RIAA's olive branch, saying the industry proposal did not go far enough. The PMRC wanted all song lyrics printed on album covers; albums with explicit covers kept behind record store counters; and a requirement that labels reassess contracts with musicians who engaged in violent or sexually explicit behavior in concert.

The PMRC also proposed a rating system similar to the MPAA's:

X for "profane or sexually explicit" lyrics
V for violence
D/A for drug and alcohol references
O for "occult" content

The RIAA rejected these demands and suggested a label reading, "Parental Guidance: Explicit Lyrics."






https://www.npr.org/sections/therec...sk-we-answer-parental-advisory---why-when-how
 

wraub

Well-known member

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Music_censorship

Does anything like this exist outside the USA? Meaning, do other countries have advisory boards that put ratings on music which in turn limits the ability to purchase by some age groups? Some bands have been banned in other countries, but that's different. For example, I know Cannibal Corpse has been banned in many countries, but I dont believe metal itself has.
 

wraub

Well-known member
The Parents Music Resource Center (PMRC) was an American committee formed in 1985 with the stated goal of increasing parental control over the access of children to music deemed to have violent, drug-related or sexual themes via labeling albums with Parental Advisory stickers. The committee was founded by four women known as the "Washington Wives" – a reference to their husbands' connections with government in the Washington, D.C. area. The women who founded the PMRC are Tipper Gore, wife of Senator and later Vice President Al Gore; Susan Baker, wife of Treasury Secretary James Baker; Pam Howar, wife of Washington realtor Raymond Howar; and Sally Nevius, wife of former Washington City Council Chairman John Nevius. The PMRC eventually grew to include 22 participants before shutting down in the mid-to-late 1990s.

One of the actions taken by the PMRC was compiling a list of fifteen songs in popular music, at the time, that they found the most objectionable. This list is known as the "Filthy Fifteen" and consists of the following songs along with the lyrical content category for which each song was considered objectionable:[2]



During his statement, musician and producer Frank Zappa asserted that "the PMRC proposal is an ill-conceived piece of nonsense which fails to deliver any real benefits to children, infringes the civil liberties of people who are not children, and promises to keep the courts busy for years dealing with the interpretation and enforcement problems inherent in the proposal's design." He went on to state his suspicion that the hearings were a front for H.R. 2911, a proposed blank tape tax: "The major record labels need to have H.R. 2911 whiz through a few committees before anybody smells a rat. One of them is chaired by Senator Thurmond. Is it a coincidence that Mrs. Thurmond is affiliated with the PMRC?" Zappa had earlier stated about the Senate's agreement to hold a hearing on the matter that "A couple of blowjobs here and there and Bingo!—you get a hearing."

Folk rock musician John Denver referred to the proposed labels as censorship and stated he was "strongly opposed to censorship of any kind in our society or anywhere else in the world", and that in his experience censors often misinterpret music, as was the case with his song "Rocky Mountain High". He further compared the PMRC proposals to Nazi book burnings,[6] and expressed his belief that censorship is ultimately counterproductive: "That which is denied becomes that which is most desired, and that which is hidden becomes that which is most interesting. Consequently, a great deal of time and energy is spent trying to get at what is being kept from you." When Denver came up to give his speech, many expected him to side with the PMRC.

Dee Snider, frontman and lead singer of the heavy metal band Twisted Sister, testified that he "[did] not support ... [RIAA president] Gortikov's unnecessary and unfortunate decision to agree to a so-called generic label on some selected records".[8] Like John Denver, Snider felt that his music had been misinterpreted. He defended the Twisted Sister songs "Under the Blade", which had been interpreted by the PMRC as referring to sadomasochism, bondage, and rape, and "We're Not Gonna Take It", which the PMRC accused of promoting violence. Snider told the panel that "Under the Blade" was inspired by a band member's surgery and was about the fear he imagined one would experience undergoing surgery, announcing that "the only sadomasochism, bondage, and rape in this song is in the mind of Ms. Gore." He further stated "Ms. Gore was looking for sadomasochism and bondage, and she found it. Someone looking for surgical references would have found it as well." Snider concluded that "The full responsibility for defending my children falls on the shoulders of my wife and I, because there is no one else capable of making these judgments for us."

Notable snippets of audio from the hearing found their way into Zappa's audiocollage "Porn Wars", released on the Frank Zappa Meets the Mothers of Prevention album. Senators Gore, Hollings, Gorton, Hawkins, and others appeared. The album cover featured a parody of the RIAA warning label. The LP included a note to listeners to send to Zappa's Barking Pumpkin Records for a free Z-PAC, a printed information package that included transcripts of the committee hearing, and a letter from Zappa encouraging young people to register to vote. Zappa's full testimonial was released on a posthumous 2010 compilation called Congress Shall Make No Law...





https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parents_Music_Resource_Center
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
And nothing from Kiss or ZZ Top, both of whom made a mint writing about their dicks and sex.

as did Elvis, Buddy Holly, Little Richard etc...

it has always been happening...
 

wraub

Well-known member

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member


So yes and no, mostly no. Most of these countries govts ban music due to religion/war reasons. Cant listen to Japanese music in S. Korea because of a war. Dumb.

Seems Australia, UK, and US are the only ones with boards who actually regulate the sale of music to specific age groups.
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
Ok everyone, I appreciate intelligent the discussion about the topic of censorship especially in relation to this specific case and movie. However when topics of 'rights' and 'liberal vs conservative' come up that is a fast track to getting a thread shut down.

So, not to censor anyone (lol), but can we maybe not let this turn into a political opinion thread? I mainly wanted to see if anyone was familiar with this movie and where to find it, which was answered almost immediately.

Thanks dudes!
A wise man....
 

SomeBadDrummer

Well-known member
And this didn't garner an honerable mention?

 

SomeBadDrummer

Well-known member
I remember. I remember people wondering if Psalms by King Solomon would be similarly labeled
It's got some pretty steamy stuff in there
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
Lyrical content was a hot topic across most genre's around that time so I'm not surprised. The general debaucherous nature of the 80's 'top 40' rock/metal scene, the rise of what was considered 'gangster rap', a resurgence in punk outside of the UK, and people just starting to (finally) question David Allan Coe lol.

I believe dudes in Spandex and women’s makeup/hair were singing about “shouting at the devil” or something? Lol
 

roncadillac

Member
I believe dudes in Spandex and women’s makeup/hair were singing about “shouting at the devil” or something? Lol

I don't remember who it was off hand but I remember hearing a band from around that same time talking about how they liked to mess with Motley Crue because they would wear high heel boots and couldn't chase them down the street lol.
 
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