Vistalite Re-Issue Split at seam. Please help

Roy E. Munson

Senior Member
I know this has been discussed in the past, but wanted a current answer if available. I have a 9x13 vistalite RE-ISSUE rack tom that has split. Now the Re-Issues have a long rectangular piece that they put over about 90% of the seam to "reinforce". This piece has perfectly cracked down the center right along with the seam. The seam is not damaged at all. Any input would be greatly appreciated.
 

Attachments

bobdadruma

Platinum Member
That is what you call a Ludwig Factory Defect if I ever saw one. That drum is all done.
Sorry, but that is the truth.
Contact Ludwig and beg for a replacement :)
 
T

The Old Hyde

Guest
I thought you meant it had a crack until I saw the picture. that is a complete joint failure. I would think fixing it would come out like a hack job, ive seen some repaired ones on ebay that look silly.
 

bobacwrd

Senior Member
I know this has been discussed in the past, but wanted a current answer if available. I have a 9x13 vistalite RE-ISSUE rack tom that has split. Now the Re-Issues have a long rectangular piece that they put over about 90% of the seam to "reinforce". This piece has perfectly cracked down the center right along with the seam. The seam is not damaged at all. Any input would be greatly appreciated.
Ludwig used to buy those re-issue Vistalite shells from a manufacturer in the Pittsburgh area (I believe) from a company called Gold n Times. The fellow who manufactured them was a guy named Ray Ducoat who I belive died in 2010. I don't know if the company is still in business. That seam can be re-glued but needs to be done with great care. I have worked with acrylics for many years and I purchased a complete set of these shells from Ray back in 2006. I actually applied the bearing edges and drilled and assembled the lugs, etc. The construction of my shells are identical to the one you pictured. There is a product on the market that you can get to re-glue that seam. It is made by a company called Weldon. They make a number of different products strictly for gluing acrylics. If I recall the best one for this application is called Weldon 30 but you may want to contact them and verify. The numbers ("30") equate to the density of the glue and drying time required. I would clean both sides of the joint of any old glue residue by lightly sanding if needed and then wipe any altered or cleaned seam with denatured alcohol before any gluing is done. Then try to clamp the shell together with a couple of band clamps. After the shell is clamped together and all is flush, you would apply the Weldon acrylic glue with a syringe applicator right at the seam but do so sparingly because the glue has the consistancy of water and can get messy. Try to get the glue only in/on the seam. If you accidentally get the glue to protrude farther than the seam it will marr any clear surface because it actually fuses the acrylic by melting so try to keep the glue in the seam only. That's why you want to use a syringe because you can focus the glue application to the seam only. It will dry to the touch almost immediately (Sort of like super glue does when you get it on your fingers) but leave the drum clamped for at least 12 hours. That should do the trick. If need be you can apply a second application after a few minutes of the initial application for additional adhesion. Good Luck, but it really isn't all that dire as some here on the site may say.
 

poika

Silver Member
Ahem, yes, but - techically it is not a glue :)
It actually kind of melts the pieces of acrylic together, and there is no excess material left at at the seam.

But that's the stuff. It really works like a charm
 

bobacwrd

Senior Member
Ahem, yes, but - techically it is not a glue :)
It actually kind of melts the pieces of acrylic together, and there is no excess material left at at the seam.

But that's the stuff. It really works like a charm
You are correct, it isn't actually glue. I just used that word for lack of a better term but I did mention that it fuses by melting...
 

poika

Silver Member
Yeah I noticed. I was merely simplifying it to the people who don't read long posts :D

Sorry for nitpicking btw
 

Roy E. Munson

Senior Member
Since I bought the kit used Ludwig will not replace it. The person I talked to from Ludwig actually just told me to google Ludwig Vistalite Repair. So I ended up finding RCI Starlite International. They are going to repair it for $110.00 plus shipping. I think that's somewhat fair.
 

poika

Silver Member
hmmm....
I would personally go the weldon route, and save a 100 bucks.

But if you don't feel okay with doing it yourself, then at least you know you'll get it done 100% right with no stress!

The thing is tho, applying the weldon is pretty easy, but if the edge goes even a little bit off you have to do the edges again, and that takes some work / time...

So maybe it's a smart move!
 

steverok

Silver Member
Since I bought the kit used Ludwig will not replace it. The person I talked to from Ludwig actually just told me to google Ludwig Vistalite Repair. So I ended up finding RCI Starlite International. They are going to repair it for $110.00 plus shipping. I think that's somewhat fair.
So this just randomly split ? Not sure how well this bodes for me, as I just bought some new Vistas this year.
 

tamadrm

Platinum Member
Gold N Times has been out of business for a while now,and RCI now makes Ludwigs vistalite shells.Ludwig by the way,never made their own acrylic shells,they were out sourced to another American company.

The newer vistalites shells are made by RCI and are chemically welded,which actually melts the plastic,and supposedly,creating a bond as strong as the material itself.The Gold n Times shells,were in fact thicker and glued using regular cyanoacrilate type glue(super glue)

Steve B
 

Roy E. Munson

Senior Member
Gold N Times has been out of business for a while now,and RCI now makes Ludwigs vistalite shells.Ludwig by the way,never made their own acrylic shells,they were out sourced to another American company.

The newer vistalites shells are made by RCI and are chemically welded,which actually melts the plastic,and supposedly,creating a bond as strong as the material itself.The Gold n Times shells,were in fact thicker and glued using regular cyanoacrilate type glue(super glue)

Steve B
well I sent the drum into RCI to repair. the guy I spoke to told me exactly this. hopefully it does the trick.
 

zarrdoss

Gold Member
That's amazing, I wonder why they don't use seamless like Crush acrylic? I got a used Pacific acrylic snare that was split on the seam and I glued it with some 3M acrylic whatever. So far so good but its black acrylic so I can get away with more mess inside. Good luck!
 

ANIMALBEATS

Silver Member
It's a bit cheeky that manufacturers don't replace items with known faults that are such obviously examples. Second hand or not.
 

tamadrm

Platinum Member
Ah, gotta love Ludwig quality...
It's not Ludwig.They didn't make the shells,Gold N Times did.

Ludwig NEVER manufactured any vistalite shells.They were ALL out sourced to different American companys from the start.

DW also gets their acrylic shells from RCI,but I'm not sure about Pearl or in the past Tama.

Zickos also made their own acrylic shells and was the first company to do so,till they decided to close up shop..

Zarrdoss----Crush makes their own seamless drums shells in a propriety process,I believe in their Florida plant,so Ludwig or anybody else that wanted seamless American made shells,would have to buy from them .

But I agree,the technology exists to make seamless shells,and considering that drummers beat on them,the weakest link will soon emerge.

The seamless process,makes much more sense.RCI should re tool.

Steve B
 

tamadrm

Platinum Member
It's a bit cheeky that manufacturers don't replace items with known faults that are such obviously examples. Second hand or not.
Maybe,but what companys do you know of ,that warrantees their products that are second hand and resold?

Steve B
 
Top