Vintage Yamaha 8000

evilg99

Platinum Member
Just wanted to start a new thread about these wonderful drums.

This is the second set of Yamaha 8000's I've owned, I have 12/13/14/16/22 in real wood. Standard depths including the 22x14 bass drum.

Used to have a very odd size kit - 8/10/14/20 in Cobalt Blue and played them exclusively for years. Sold them because I hated the blue. Wish I could have those back again, the sizes were cool.

These drums are simply among the best Yamaha has ever made. The lugs are beautiful, the shells are a mix of birch and mahogany and finished on the inside. I own 9000 and vintage MIJ Recording Customs series drums from this era and for ME - the 8000 is better - especially the bass drum. Deep, warm and musical. Might be the easiest drums to tune that I own.

Thinking of converting the 14"x10" tom into a snare drum , maybe cutting it down a bit, maybe to a 14x8. Don't really use it much as a tom. Anybody out there ever done this? Curious to know the results.

Also - on the lookout for a 10" tom in real wood, to complete this kit.

Anybody out there looking for a great kit on the used market that doesn't cost a fortune- search for these, they don't disappoint on any level.

Here they are at a recent gig:

IMG_4428 copy.JPG
 
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Artstar

Platinum Member
.

I owned one of these from the Taiwan production and it was one of my favorite sets I've had.
 

williamsbclontz

Silver Member
How has the shell kept up over the years? I have a birch/mahogany Yamaha kit from the 90s and the bass drum shell has started to split between the plies. And I know the 8000 series is older than mine. I have a plenty of other Yamaha kits with nothing wrong at all so I don't know if it's an unusual thing or not. Regardless the bass drum still sounds pretty good
 

evilg99

Platinum Member
How has the shell kept up over the years? I have a birch/mahogany Yamaha kit from the 90s and the bass drum shell has started to split between the plies. And I know the 8000 series is older than mine. I have a plenty of other Yamaha kits with nothing wrong at all so I don't know if it's an unusual thing or not. Regardless the bass drum still sounds pretty good
All my shells are structurally perfect. No ply separation, all in round, bearing edges good. Lots of cosmetic dings and dents (to be expected).

I wonder if your climate has something to do with that. It's a lot less humid here than it is there. And of course, we have the cold winter.
 

williamsbclontz

Silver Member
All my shells are structurally perfect. No ply separation, all in round, bearing edges good. Lots of cosmetic dings and dents (to be expected).

I wonder if your climate has something to do with that. It's a lot less humid here than it is there. And of course, we have the cold winter.
I had the drums shipped from New York to Louisiana so you're probably right about climate having to do with it. It went from being cold and dry to hot and humid in only a few days so it makes sense
 

lefty2

Platinum Member
How has the shell kept up over the years? I have a birch/mahogany Yamaha kit from the 90s and the bass drum shell has started to split between the plies. And I know the 8000 series is older than mine. I have a plenty of other Yamaha kits with nothing wrong at all so I don't know if it's an unusual thing or not. Regardless the bass drum still sounds pretty good
I have 88 model Power Tour Customs same shell design as 8000. I've had them in some pretty adverse conditions over the years and they're holding up great. No ply separation or anything.
 

lefty2

Platinum Member
Just wanted to start a new thread about these wonderful drums.

These drums are simply among the best Yamaha has ever made. The lugs are beautiful, the shells are a mix of birch and mahogany and finished on the inside. I own 9000 and vintage MIJ Recording Customs series drums from this era and for ME - the 8000 is better - especially the bass drum. Deep, warm and musical. Might be the easiest drums to tune that I own.

View attachment 81722
I must agree. I bought a power tour custom kit in 88 and still have them. I use them for rehearsals now. Mostly because I don't like the deep tom sizes any more, but they are great drums. Your kit is really nice. I love the natural wood.
 

Skrivarna

Senior Member
The 8000 series in the real wood finish are among the most beautiful drums ever made. I really, really wanted a set like that when I started playing drums, looking through drum magazines and the "bible", the Yamaha System Drums catalogue, in the early 80's.

Regarding cutting down that tom; don't do it! I have (on an odd orphan drum), and with the proper snare bed it sounds great and it was not hard to do. But I would never, ever, modify a part of a kit like your 8000. Remember that there are many great snares available, but not many toms like that. You'll probably regret it (like selling the blue kit).
 

evilg99

Platinum Member
The 8000 series in the real wood finish are among the most beautiful drums ever made. I really, really wanted a set like that when I started playing drums, looking through drum magazines and the "bible", the Yamaha System Drums catalogue, in the early 80's.

Regarding cutting down that tom; don't do it! I have (on an odd orphan drum), and with the proper snare bed it sounds great and it was not hard to do. But I would never, ever, modify a part of a kit like your 8000. Remember that there are many great snares available, but not many toms like that. You'll probably regret it (like selling the blue kit).
Ahh that Yamaha System Drums catalog, yes that was one of my favourites....and the awesome posters !

You're right - it's easy to get snares that sound great (already have several) but that tom - they ain't making any more of those. Stepping away from the table saw.

And when I think even more of the stupidity of that consideration - I don't even care to have matched snares , in fact I usually prefer something else. Sometimes you just get a concept in your head...
 
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