Upcoming Netflix Documentary on Drummers

someguy01

Platinum Member
I guess because I was never a Rush fan I don't have the love for Neil that some do. I could take or leave his drumming. It's super technical and clean, but never moved me in any way, and for that matter neither did any of Rush's music.
Let the shock and potential hate commence.
For the record, I feel the same way about Buddy Rich.
 

Woolwich

Silver Member
someguy01 has eloquently "broken the seal". I never "got" Rush and therefore didn't "get" Neil Peart. Of my circle of friends and musical acquaintances there's only one of us who is a fan and that's all fine by me.
From what I have seen and learned about Neil Peart he seemed to be a shy humble and excellent human being, I believe he rarely took a bow with his bandmates at the end of a gig, preferring to shun the limelight. As such he's the perfect musician NOT to appear in a Netflix documentary.
 

Cmdr. Ross

Silver Member
I just want to point out that in 2021, unless you are 50+, Foo Fighters is more important than Rush. Only Rush fans will be upset by no Peart.
I speak from experience that being a Rush fan was something one didn't advertise among your metal friends. And if you were a female fan, you were in the 1% of their total nerd fanbase.

I've always been a fan of heavier music, but as a drummer, Neil taught me how to compose and control what I played behind the kit. Something no other drummer (metal or otherwise) could do for me in the 80's.

Yes...He should've gotten at least an honorable mention here, but after watching him in his many videos, he talks too damn much. Goes into FAR more detail about things that any drummer could possibly care about.
So to edit a comment of his into the time allotted would've been a challenge for anyone.

Sort of like Stewart Copeland. He can get so lost in the details of his craft, you get to the point that you're scrambling for the mute button!

This video was done well to balance all those involved.
 

yammyfan

Senior Member
Just to be clear... I'm not complaining that they didn't get Neil on camera to talk about himself or drumming... I just find it odd that nobody else talked about him and/or his influence. Again, he's one of the most name checked drummers in all of music history.

Keith Moon, John Bonham, Ginger Baker, Charlie Watts... none of those guys got speaking parts either. They got plenty of coverage nonetheless.
 

yammyfan

Senior Member
Here's a good synopsis of that encounter.

Interestingly, I played in a band a couple of years ago with a guy who played that afternoon. He was the bassist for Kathleen Edwards at the time. He said it was the biggest crowd he ever played to even though he'd played on Letterman and Leno a couple of times too.
 
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someguy01

Platinum Member
So I just watched it and it was good entertainment. Nicko and his tangible passion for drums was the best part for me. His love is infectious.
Really, it showcases a group of musicians who clearly love their instrument and love what they do. I enjoyed that 90min.
 

GretschedHive

Silver Member
Here's a good synopsis of that encounter.

GOD, what a great story!
 

BigDrew

Junior Member
I just watched this and here are my random thoughts...read them if you want to...

No Neil Peart was a real miss.
I really don't like Chad Smith or Taylor Hawkins.
I thought the woman thing was a bit unnecessary.
I loved the sound of Stephen Perkin's snare (aluminum DW?)
Just another example of why Cindy Blackman is such a damn badass! She's so good and just makes those drums sing...with power!
 

yammyfan

Senior Member
Well, there's a name I didn't expect to see in this thread. (She's one of my favorite musicians of this century. Absolutely fabulous.)
I agree. She's terrific. It was a joy to play in a band with that guy. He was with her for those first few studio albums and tours. He appreciated the fact that I learned every song on the band's EP's for my audition. I guess that's part of the reason why I got the gig.

Kathleen lives about a 30 minute drive from me. I hope to jam with her someday.
 
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paradiddle pete

Guest
I found it interesting how the Linn drums introduction altered the conversation from Swinging the beat to Punch.. And here we are still being punched. mmm t mmm t mmm t mmm t...
 

Sebenza

Member
I just found it odd that all of the most commonly name checked rock drummers in history were there - Ringo, Moon, Baker, Bonham, etc. yet Peart's name didn't come up once. Like, you never see that happen in real conversation.

Neil Peart was not just another drummer. His name will forever be tossed around in debates about the greatest/most influential rock drummers in music history. How it didn't come up once in an hour and twenty minute documentary about drummers is beyond perplexing. You would almost have to go out of your way to avoid mentioning him.
Maybe it was a European producer or something? I can honestly say Neil Peart was never once mentioned in any conversation I had with other musicians or fellow drummers. It wasn't until the internet came into my life (around 2007 or so) that I found out he was such a big thing. All the other usual suspects mentioned here popped up regularly, but Rush and Peart were complete unknowns to me. And I was knee-deep in music from 80 onwards and started gigging at around 1988. Was Rush even a thing in Europe?
 

Juniper

Gold Member
It was fine, it didn’t really add much and the same drummers covered & interviewed. felt a bit stale and not a ‘players’ documentary so much.

Probably more a documentary for non drummers or people just starting the drums (or parents of), and that’s completely cool as I’m sure a lot of people will enjoy it.

At the end of the day I’d rather be watching this than anything else on Netflix, so it’s all good.

Grateful for it all the same.
 
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Hewitt2

Senior Member
Look, I’m a simple man and my barometer as to why I enjoyed it was pretty straight-forward:

Did it make me feel like the little kid again who felt the profound wonder of drums as a magical rhythmic force? Yup

Did I jump on my drums as soon as I was done watching it? Definitely

The mega-jam at the end was a nice touch.

Kudos to the producers for giving equal air time to the awesome women players out there and helping to inspire the next generation of talented little girls.
 

cbphoto

Diamond Member
Kudos to the producers for giving equal air time to the awesome women players out there and helping to inspire the next generation of talented little girls.
Such as Nandy Bushell (I gotta double-post this cuz it's really lovely):

 
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mpthomson

Senior Member
Maybe it was a European producer or something? I can honestly say Neil Peart was never once mentioned in any conversation I had with other musicians or fellow drummers. It wasn't until the internet came into my life (around 2007 or so) that I found out he was such a big thing. All the other usual suspects mentioned here popped up regularly, but Rush and Peart were complete unknowns to me. And I was knee-deep in music from 80 onwards and started gigging at around 1988. Was Rush even a thing in Europe?
The producers and authors are British, and Rush really isn't that much of a thing in the UK, never has been. Known about, yes, but a thing in the same way that they appear to be in the US, definitely not.
 
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