UFIP review part 2

Cymbalise

Senior Member
Some of you may remember we sent a massive amount of stock to the very kind people over at mikedolbear.co.uk not so long ago for them to cast their discerning sticks over. The feedback so far from them has been very positive indeed, and they've just published the second part of the review, the Natural series!

Head on over to http://www.mikedolbear.com/story.asp?StoryID=3661 and have a read. Included is a nice long video review.

Make sure you watch to the end of the video - our personal faves here at Cymbalise HQ, the 15" Light Hats, 22" Extra Light Ride, 20" Crash and 22" Light Ride all get to share the kit at the same time and hearing them all together really is a sonic treat :)

Part 1, the Experience Blast series is still available at: http://www.mikedolbear.com/story.asp?StoryID=3638

Part 3, the Bionic series, will be getting published in a few more weeks - keep your eyes peeled!

PS: we're really getting into the Christmas spirit here at Cymbalise, and to celebrate up to 24th December we're offering 10% off all our stock, still with free UK shipping and discounted shipping to the rest of the world. Merry Christmas!
 

jeff_r0x

Member
Re: New UFIP review part 2 - Natural series

Congratulations. Great review. Of course I'm already a UFIP fan, so...

I met another UFIP convert on another forum last week. Typical of most of us, (especially the ones who discovered UFIP from the current, modern lines), his response was something like, "Hi. I recently discovered UFIP as well. I ended up selling off my collection of Big 3 cymbals and bought a whole mess of UFIP pies. Couldn't be happier."

Sound familiar? :)
 

Florian

Gold Member
Re: New UFIP review part 2 - Natural series

A big fan of UFIP here as well...just picked up a set of Natural hats (14") and LOVE them. I like them better than my Class series hats..they seem a bit warmer and fit well within the Class series crashes and rides I use.


F
 

keefer

Junior Member
Re: New UFIP review part 2 - Natural series

Congratulations. Great review. Of course I'm already a UFIP fan, so...

I met another UFIP convert on another forum last week. Typical of most of us, (especially the ones who discovered UFIP from the current, modern lines), his response was something like, "Hi. I recently discovered UFIP as well. I ended up selling off my collection of Big 3 cymbals and bought a whole mess of UFIP pies. Couldn't be happier."

Sound familiar? :)

What type/style of music do you play?
 

JustJames

Platinum Member
Re: New UFIP review part 2 - Natural series

UFIPism is a weird thing.

On many "what cymbal?" threads I see Dre25 recommend UFIPs, and usually get no reaction. It's as though people who don't already own UFIP are incapable of reading his posts.

If you own them you love them, if you don't own them (yet) it seems to be hard to look past the "big names".
 
Re: New UFIP review part 2 - Natural series

Quite like what i'm hearing on their website.

I might be looking into them next year when it's time for recording. There's a distributor nearby and i'm quite amazed at the prices honestly.Not a 100% sure on the china's though.
 

jeff_r0x

Member
What type/style of music do you play?
I play a variety of what would be termed electric styles. I've used these cymbals on everything from blues to 80's and 90's hard rock to Dennis Chambers style fusion. I've used them live, both miked and unmiked, as well as recorded. The Class series crash cymbals are really the flagship for UFIP and are certainly quite versatile. However, I think they have like 8 or 9 professional lines now, so there is definitely something for everybody. Definitely not a one trick pony.

UFIPism is a weird thing.

On many "what cymbal?" threads I see Dre25 recommend UFIPs, and usually get no reaction. It's as though people who don't already own UFIP are incapable of reading his posts.

If you own them you love them, if you don't own them (yet) it seems to be hard to look past the "big names".
Very true, but I'm not so sure they are not being read. I was recently "put in my place" on another forum, merely for expressing my opinion that UFIP cymbals made my Zildjian ones sound weak and 2 dimensional. This particular forum (that shall remain unnamed, but their initials are DFO) tends towards shallow discussion anyways. Much of it becomes a list of cheerleading threads of "Who likes big cymbals. I do, I do." to "Who likes Paiste. I do, I do." There is a large prejudice towards cymbals outside of the Big 3, to the point where it's ok if you use Sabian, to say that they sound better than Z or P, but if you should speak of the big guys as inferior sonically to UFIP, then you must be reminded that this is only YOUR opinion, and lots of companies are doing good things.
 

TopHat

Senior Member
Re: New UFIP review part 2 - Natural series

Quite like what i'm hearing on their website.

I might be looking into them next year when it's time for recording. There's a distributor nearby and i'm quite amazed at the prices honestly.Not a 100% sure on the china's though.
I own the Experience Real China B20's (18 and 20 inches) and I really like them. I prefer the 20 because its more explosive and great for riding. The 18 is a very short accent piece. The Rough series and Natural series both have amazing china's as well.
 

TopHat

Senior Member
Re: New UFIP review part 2 - Natural series

UFIPism is a weird thing.

On many "what cymbal?" threads I see Dre25 recommend UFIPs, and usually get no reaction. It's as though people who don't already own UFIP are incapable of reading his posts.

If you own them you love them, if you don't own them (yet) it seems to be hard to look past the "big names".
UFIP has a bit of an uphill climb here in the states. For one, the big 3, and in particular Zildjian and Paiste have basically 50 year head start on UFIP. Almost any band that an American kid grew up wanting to imitate, played something from one of those two companies. Whether is Bonham and the Giant Beats (602's also very popular), or the A/K series from a number of bands. Getting people to step out of that box is a very hard thing to do (was for me), because people want to imitate a sound.

Then beyond just imitating the sound is the fan boy ism. I won't play anything but Zildjian (which is fine) but completely rain on anyone's parade who thinks about doing so. Or Paiste. Or Sabian.

I own all UFIPs now, and if I had any reason to keep all those other brands, I would. But I wouldn't begrudge anyone playing another brand, because I like them all for different reasons. I've always been kinda curious about Sabian (as a Z spinoff), but haven't dipped my toe in that water yet.
 

Duck Tape

Platinum Member
Oops. Hope I don't sound like a fan boy. There are ufips that I don't like but on average their stuff is better than the average pro stuff from the bigger companies (alot of which I think sound bad). And I like good cymbals, doesn't matter the brand.

I don't agree with the reviewer saying naturals don't suit metal. I have a heavy natural ride and its a beast. And listen to those hats, they're gritty and have a pretty strong bell sound. Maybe the crashes are a bit dry but they sound like great metal cymbals to me.
 

jeff_r0x

Member
Oops. Hope I don't sound like a fan boy. There are ufips that I don't like but on average their stuff is better than the average pro stuff from the bigger companies (alot of which I think sound bad). And I like good cymbals, doesn't matter the brand.

I don't agree with the reviewer saying naturals don't suit metal. I have a heavy natural ride and its a beast. And listen to those hats, they're gritty and have a pretty strong bell sound. Maybe the crashes are a bit dry but they sound like great metal cymbals to me.
I have a 21" Bionic heavy ride but the Natural Heavy ride was my second choice. I agree with your assessment. There might be some cymbals that are better suited for full on metal (think Avenged Sevenfold), but all of the lines have some versatility to them. I was surprised to get away with using Bionic hats in a jazz/fusion group. The playback just sounded good in context with the other players.
 

Cymbalise

Senior Member
As part of their restructuring of the Naturals and Bionics recently they made both lines thinner, and in the case of the Naturals removed the Heavy models.

You can easily tell the old from the new by the logos - new Naturals have red logos instead of white, and new Bionics have blue logos instead of black.

The old Natural heavy ride could be just the ticket for metal - dark, pingy, gritty (good adjective!), loud but MUSICAL to go with it all!
 

jeff_r0x

Member
Well, I'm preparing for a short studio session tomorrow with guitarist James Crouch. I'm anticipating the songs to fall somewhere between roots rock and full blown blues. I'll be bringing my 21" Bionic Heavy Ride, 17" & 18" Class medium crashes, an 8" Brilliant splash, and since I don't have any UFIP hats at the moment, I'll be using 14" Zanki Rotocasting hats. I will have a couple of extra pies in the case, but I fully anticipate this these will fit the bill nicely.
 
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Re: New UFIP review part 2 - Natural series

I own the Experience Real China B20's (18 and 20 inches) and I really like them. I prefer the 20 because its more explosive and great for riding. The 18 is a very short accent piece. The Rough series and Natural series both have amazing china's as well.
From all the china's i've hear samples from i'm really loving the sabian holy china (both).

As for UFIP.

Tiger ride 22 & 14 hats seem to have my preference.
Class 8" splash medium 10" light.
Still got a lot of browsing through the ufip catalogue to do for crashes.
As for china's the Experience real china B20's definatly seem like something up my alley.

Style of music would be metal (from groovy death six feet under style till nile/cryptopsy).

There's a distributor in the country that seems to have a crapload of UFIP's in stock wich is surprizing to say the least. Usually belgium has squat all regarding these things so that's a pleasant surprize at least \m/

I'll just be bashing away on my sabians & paiste's for the time being wich i intend to keep for practice anyways.

Got my first drumset coming in januari (using the one at rehearsal & pads at home) so anything that can keep costs down for me is a plus (renting rehearsal space meh).
 

JustJames

Platinum Member
Oops. Hope I don't sound like a fan boy. There are ufips that I don't like but on average their stuff is better than the average pro stuff..
You're in the clear - I've seen you recommend other cymbals too.

Oh balls...now that makes me look like an interweb stalker.

FWIW, I am in way more danger of fanboyism as all that I have ever owned are no name cheapies that vaguely resemble cymbals until struck and UFIP Supernovas.
 

porter

Platinum Member
If you own them you love them, if you don't own them (yet) it seems to be hard to look past the "big names".
I've tried them and I like the blast series, but I prefer my HHXs and Byzances. Sorry :)

That said, I'd love a pair of 12" Natural hats.

Why are the pictures in the review white-logo'd, yet the video's cymbals are red logo'd?
 

jeff_r0x

Member
Oops. Hope I don't sound like a fan boy. There are ufips that I don't like but on average their stuff is better than the average pro stuff from the bigger companies (alot of which I think sound bad). And I like good cymbals, doesn't matter the brand.

I don't agree with the reviewer saying naturals don't suit metal. I have a heavy natural ride and its a beast. And listen to those hats, they're gritty and have a pretty strong bell sound. Maybe the crashes are a bit dry but they sound like great metal cymbals to me.
A fanboy is what the naysayers call you, because they just aren't in on the secret yet.

The Big 3 may have a large market share at the moment, but I really see the innovation coming from the small guys like UFIP. I just don't ever hear of people having musical epiphanies regarding the Big 3, or even other small companies. I think UFIP is so well poised because they really have such a full range of cymbals to choose from. It's like someone blew all the crud out of my ears and I just heard what music sounds like.
 

porter

Platinum Member
Up until a couple of years ago, the natural series had a white logo. They probably jsut pulled an old stock photo off the net.
I guess more accurately, why didn't they take new pictures :)

I just don't ever hear of people having musical epiphanies regarding the Big 3, or even other small companies.
meinl meinl meinl meinl :)

I agree though. Certainly, the rotocasting has to play some role. The diminishing of sustain (at least in models I've heard) and strengthening of the bell seems to be something certain people like a lot. There definitely aren't a lot of other manufacturers doing rotocasting, so it makes sense that people that like those qualities are raving about UFiP.
 

jeff_r0x

Member
I guess more accurately, why didn't they take new pictures :)



meinl meinl meinl meinl :)

I agree though. Certainly, the rotocasting has to play some role. The diminishing of sustain (at least in models I've heard) and strengthening of the bell seems to be something certain people like a lot. There definitely aren't a lot of other manufacturers doing rotocasting, so it makes sense that people that like those qualities are raving about UFiP.

What all have you tried? Anything besides Blasts? Blasts are basically in a beta testing mode. I wouldn't call them indicative of the UFIP brand at all.

As for Meinl, their market share is currently diminishing. Fans might not immediately notice it, because cymbals are generally a long term investment. But according to those in retail I've discussed it with, their footprint is definitely shrinking.

Rotocasting is merely a method of production. Whereas the Turkish method is to heated ingot, roll and press in order to strengthen the product (kind of akin to baking bread), the rotocasting pours hot into the mold, forcing inconsistencies to the edge for removal upon lathing. It does appear to have the effect of creating a more consistent cymbal all the way around. Sonically, you don't get the lingering hum of certain annoying frequencies after the others have died off. They tend to fall of together, whether slow or quick.

Outside of the Blasts, the line with the shortest sustain would have to be the Tiger series. Those are B8, and although still rotocast and hand made, they are considered mid-line. The Class series has considerable sustain in the crashes, as does the Rough and Bionic series. The Bionics have more cut in the upper range, while the Rough series focuses a bit more towards the midrange frequencies.
 
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