Two rides?

wildbill

Platinum Member
I use 2 rides now.

In the past, I used a ride and a crash, but used the crash as a small ride - ha ha.
 
For my current project, I have been using a Paiste Dry Dark 20" on the left and a 1960s Zildjian 20" with three rivets on the right, more or less opposites in terms of sound. Both are crashable (although the Dry Dark has a very unusual 'shattering' sort of crash) and I have been enjoying this setup so much that when I used a crash at our last session, it felt wrong.

The music has a lot of space and dynamics but is more towards dub/ambient, not jazz.

Nice to see that quite a few people are using this sort of setup! :)
 

Deathmetalconga

Platinum Member
Just curious, anyone else use two ride cymbals?

I recently came upon the opportunity to buy a second identical crash/ride to the one I'm currently using for a bargain price, so got it thinking perhaps good to have a spare. However I've now set my kit up with a second ride on the opposite side to my regular ride on the right (I'm a right-handed player). I'm finding this very useful when I want to switch quickly from the hi-hat to the ride quickly. I don't use the bell on this one as I've mounted a splash above it.

Anyone else do anything similar?
I used to. I have thought about it. I think anyone contemplating a new ride should keep their old one first, then play both and see if they like the new one better, or the old one, or if they just like both of them.
 

Living Dead Drummer

Platinum Member
I don't do this often, but I have in the past used two rides.
One real thick and "pingy" and one thin, dark and washy. I typically will have the heavy one mounted in place of my normal ride, and the washy one overlapping it on the right hand side.
 

Quai34

Junior Member
Hi Guys,
As said in some other threads, I found in love with drums and especially cymbals since I decided to have my new Funk/Dance band praticing in my basement, thus the purchase of a Drums kit for our drummer (So, the kit stays in place between rehearsals and is ready to play at anytime).
I love rides, maybe it's my background in Jazz as a piano player and the Tama used drums kit came with an Avedis Zildjian 21" Ping Rock Ride heavy weight years 1970's made in Canada.... So, I also bought a 23" sweet ride 25th anniversary thinking that it could be my wash ride compared to the ping ride.... But both of them, and especially the 21" are not very crash able, the 23" yes, a bit but very dark and low pitch but the 21", forget it, it will make the rack vibrating a lot... Even if the ride is on a pole close to the toms rack.
So, questions now:
1) Did I made a good choice in choosing a sweet ride as a wash ride?
2) Is a Sabain Raw Bell Dry Ride will be even more pingy with the ability to be a bit more crashable, the 21" HHX for example...
3) Is the Meinl Foundry Foundry Reserve 20" ride, not the light ride, will be close to my heavy ride or close in term or "Pingyness" to a Sabian Raw Bell Drive 21"?
4) Is a Meinl Foundry Reserve 20" light ride could be used as well as a 20" crash? I'm also planning to buy a Foundry Reserve 18" crash because yes, I know they could be used as a small ride...
That's it, sorry for all the questions and hesitation but former drummer starts looking at other Colors only if I buy it for him.... He's been using the same cymbals for 30 years, two crashes and one ride, never had any splashes etc.... But maybe because he said he's cheap and doesn't want to buy anything more to play...
The new drummer seems to be more opened in fact so, I'm just planning a "maybe" next purchase...
 

MntnMan62

Junior Member
I think using two rides really depnds on the type of music you are playing. For ride-heavy music such as jazz, two rides with different sounds can be highly beneficial. But for most rock or other types of music, one ride is probably all you really need.
 

doggyd69b

Active member
No. Having 2 rides to me is just kinda over doing it. Its kinda like having 2 hi hats
Not quite the same, I can use an opened normal (left placed set) for regular playing, then a closed set (placed on the right) for when I need to do double bass passages. with Rides it may be a little overkill due to the sizes, but I have seen a trend on drummers doing ride patterns with two rides, usually those could be played with only one but having more makes it easier.
Maybe more rides are no issue for this guy:

 

Juniper

Gold Member
You might want to check out the Sabian HH Vanguard series. I have (besides the 14" hats) .... 16", 18", 20", and 21" cymbals. Ride/crashes or crash/rides .... you decide what/how you want to play them.
Amazing cymbals aren't they. I have a 21" as a ride and it's just lovely.

Congrats on the set of them, I'm very jealous.
 

Stroker

Platinum Member
Two rides for me, and looking to invest in another, possibly two.

Paiste 2002, 20" & 22" Power Rides.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
I use two. The left is pingy and the right is washy. I could switch this to two hats and one ride if I wanted, but I can't pick a ride and I really like this setup.

IMG_20200123_144714.jpg

The picture kinda sucks. I'm not a photographer.
 

SmoothOperator

Gold Member
Just curious, anyone else use two ride cymbals?

I recently came upon the opportunity to buy a second identical crash/ride to the one I'm currently using for a bargain price, so got it thinking perhaps good to have a spare. However I've now set my kit up with a second ride on the opposite side to my regular ride on the right (I'm a right-handed player). I'm finding this very useful when I want to switch quickly from the hi-hat to the ride quickly. I don't use the bell on this one as I've mounted a splash above it.

Anyone else do anything similar?
I don't think it is a good idea to have two cymbals that are in a similar range, it wears on the ear, doesn't give you options for playing with other people.
 

harryconway

Platinum Member
Amazing cymbals aren't they. I have a 21" as a ride and it's just lovely.
Yes, wonderful. The 21" was the first one I got. And the only one under $200. Then I got the hats. And after playing that combo. together I added (had to, I was sold) the 18", the 16", and the 20". in that order.
 

Rattlin' Bones

Gold Member
I used a 20" ride ride and a very thin lite 16" ride with rivets that is also an excellent crash. I can ride the 16" and it has a very different sound than the 20". The whole point of having multiple cymbals for the music I play (jazz and blues) is to vary the sound of the cymbals. When I'm backing the keys player or bass I'll ride the small rivet cymbal. Backing the guitar or sax I'll use larger ride. Backing whole band I use larger ride. And their bells sound different so I get two different bell sounds. And I can crash the small rivet cymbal it sounds very sweet as a crash quick and flash with quick decay. . So two rides for two very different sounds.
 

dmacc_2

Well-known member
I practice The New Breed books quite a bit and get a lot of mileage of having a ride to my left and a ride to my right.

One of the beauty of this instrument unlike many others, we each get to decide what elements we want set up and how with the added benefit of changing things on the fly.
 

petrez

Senior Member
I want to have two rides for the sole purpose of learning this routine (and yeah, my band want to cover this song now....), Randy Black is definately a open handed beast of a drummer... :)
 

RickP

Gold Member
I prefer purchasing and playing rides that have at some crash capabilities . I hate rides that are all ping and have no shimmer .

Mel Lewis once said and I paraphrase here “ Every cymbal I have is a ride and every cymbal I have is a crash , hihats included . You need ride cymbals not crash cymbals “.
Mel was right - as a member of a band and in the audience , hearing the same ride cymbal sound all night gets boring fast .
 
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