Tuning with those big round bearing edges

fess

Senior Member
I have a set of C&C drums with those big rounded edges that I'm using for rock and I'm struggling with the tuning. Tuned low, they sound great behind the kit, but out front they completely lack resonance and sound like cardboard boxes. In order to get them to resonate, they seem to need to be tuned very high and wind up sounding like a jazz kit. I have a 13" side tom along with a 14 & 16 floor. The 16 really needs to be tight or it's really dead. Also very difficult to get enough spread in tone between the drums.
I've tried single & 2 ply heads.
Other than micing, anyone have any suggestions?
 

double_G

Silver Member
one thing to try is to make sure each tom is tuned to the resonance frequency of the shell & see how they sound out front. i am wondering if C&C puts the note on the inside of each shell (like DW does) ?
 

Andy

Administrator
Staff member
I have a set of C&C drums with those big rounded edges that I'm using for rock and I'm struggling with the tuning. Tuned low, they sound great behind the kit, but out front they completely lack resonance and sound like cardboard boxes.
This is a common issue with thinner ply shells & rounded edges. With sharper edges, part of the near field "resonance" you're hearing is actually head sustain, & head sustain is near useless in an acoustic stage environment. Rounded edges don't even have that little driver's seat ego stroking feature.

Bottom line is, you need to excite those shells. A rounded edge is actually much easier to tune than a sharp edge. Much more forgiving. The greater head contact puts the brakes on head sustain, but drives more vibration into the shell. If those vibrations aren't at a frequency that excites the shell, you have a tonally flat result. The answer is to crank the reso!!!!! By taking the reso up higher than the batter head, you're exciting the shell at sympathetic frequencies, & the lower overtones generated will give the drum richness of tone that should translate in front of the kit.

Every drum responds differently. Tune your batter head to the sound / feel / pitch that you require, then start cranking that reso head up in small steps, each time ensuring it's in tune with itself (around the lugs). Keep doing this until the drum starts to open up (that should be audibly very obvious), then fine tune from that point. You might be surprised just how high the reso head needs to go. Don't be put off by that, just keep going.

Hope this helps :)
 

bobdadruma

Platinum Member
Just backing up what has been stated.
My experience with my 2012 Ludwig Club Date kit which has medium/thin thickness shells and full round over edges is to tighten the resonant heads tighter than you would on a sharp edge kit. These drums don't produce the mid range tones that sharp edge kits produce. They like highs and lows. My vintage kits with reinforcement rings and round over edges are similar.

My bottom heads usually wind up at about 79/80 in Drum Dial speak. Double ply batter heads will come in at about 76/77 on the dial. This allows these drums to bend a note when struck and make an interesting warm tone. You have to be a few feet away from the kit before you can appreciate the fullness of the sound.
 

deltdrum

Senior Member
I typically tune my reso's on my old 68' Super Classics ~ a major 3rd above the batter. Does that seem about right?
 
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