Tuning opinion...

Stroman

Platinum Member
I like to go for the higher jazz tunings, really makes my toms stand out especially for louder music.

Tony, I'm going to give the non-cranked reso again. I normally go for a higher tensioned reso because I like the sound and response that it gives. My normal method of tuning the batter to where it sounds good and sings and tuning the reso till it goes "plink plink" has not worked on my Acrolite. I cannot tune this damn snare drum to my liking. After the 3rd Ludwig 14x5 Aluminum snare I'm starting to think that its me.

I'm going to try Steve's method, shoot for a lower reso and slightly higher batter, get out the drum key and really take my time with this snare. I have heard many Acros/400 Supras that sound wonderful so I know it can be done.

It's worth a try. I usually use a super-tight reso on most snares, but I have a birch 14X5 Tama for which that tuning method simply doesn't work. I have to use a looser reso on that one. Give it a shot with the Acro!
 

RIneuron

Senior Member
It's worth a try. I usually use a super-tight reso on most snares, but I have a birch 14X5 Tama for which that tuning method simply doesn't work. I have to use a looser reso on that one. Give it a shot with the Acro!
I had a heck of a time making my Supraphonic sound good (mainly because I don't like a lot of overtones/ringing, never any trouble getting a good attack and projection) and eventually found that tuning both heads very high, backing off veery slightly on the batter until it sounded right, and adding a couple of moon gels got me where I wanted to be. May work for an Acro too.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
On snares, for a 5" deep drum, I like the batter about half as low than I would on a 6.5 or 7" deep drum. Deep drums I crank higher, shallower snares I tune lower for some depth. The reso stays the same amount of tight in both situations.

Really liking the Remo no collar snare head. My rim was getting near the bearing edge with the collared head.
 

delta drummer

Junior Member
I have been playing for 50 years and use to do the cris cross tuning method by tapping the head right at the lug and going across to the other lug.I now use a drum dial and it is much quicker. You may have to tweek it some but it works for me.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
After many years of tuning and analyzing, I've settled on a method that I really like. I've come to a conclusion that there are tuning "lines" that go from one lug to it's opposite lug. A 6 lug drum would have 3 tuning "lines", an 8 lug drum would have 4 tuning "lines".

Using 2 keys is....well, key here. A big tuning issue is getting the head even on both sides of the tuning "line". It's really easy to feel with 2 keys. After initial tensioning, I select the one tuning "line" that sounds the purest, and match the remaining "lines" to it.

But it's the 2 keys on just 1 "line"....and your sense of feel..... that really help in getting the head even. Took me about a thousand head changes to understand this.

Drums with an odd number of lugs... like Gretsch rack toms... you can't use this method. It relies on lugs that are opposite one another.
 
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