Tune-Bot your method

Auspicious

Well-known member
Man, those are crazily high-tuned drums. That floor tom, especially.

Just for the heck of it, try the 12" at 112 Hz and the floor tom at 73 Hz. Yes, those are the fundamental frequencies.

That means 168 over 202 (lug pitches) for the 12" and 110 over 131 for the floor tom.

Snare drum: try 300 over 392 and see what you think of that.
Jesus I thought it was closer to medium then high, really. The resonant head was at 360 and I liked the snare better when I lowered the tension to probably bellow 300.. I reduced the tension of the reso untill I liked the feel of the snares, the chains.

But appart from the fact that the drum is too high, I would like to know if the notes are ok, the interval.
 

yammyfan

Senior Member
See notes in red

I am pretty sure my results, the notes and frequency were close to spot on. BUT, the interval was wrong and the snare, choked with dead chains..

I don't know why.
You're definitely on the right track. The drums sound close to choking in the video you posted, however.

For the snare, loosen the wires all the way until you can slip a drumstick under them to keep them from touching the snare head. Tune each lug to 389-392 Hz. Much higher than 400 and you risk choking the drum.

Snares can be tricky at the best of times.
 

yammyfan

Senior Member
Jesus I thought it was closer to medium then high, really. The resonant head was at 360 and I liked the snare better when I lowered the tension to probably bellow 300.. I reduced the tension of the reso untill I liked the feel of the snares, the chains.

But appart from the fact that the drum is too high, I would like to know if the notes are ok, the interval.
If the snare side head is too loose you lose sensitivity and responsiveness. Try 389 Hz, maybe 392. 400 works too but I personally don't go higher than that.
 

Auspicious

Well-known member
You're definitely on the right track. The drums sound close to choking in the video you posted, however.

For the snare, loosen the wires all the way until you can slip a drumstick under them to keep them from touching the snare head. Tune each lug to 389-392 Hz. Much higher than 400 and you risk choking the drum.

Snares can be tricky at the best of times.
--> I am on the right track, I am very happy to read that :D thank you.

It's going to improve, this is fast track learning, I am a slow learner but eventually, I'll be able to do it right, low medium or high.

YEssss!!
 

Auspicious

Well-known member
Bon, now the Tune-Bot is reading somewhat the frequencies above 300hz now, the reso head was at about 350hz and I believe it, it's very tight and the note is really a F4.

I tried using the difference filter once once I caught a 350hz, to adjust the others.. like suggested previously.. i think it's going to work.

I will crank it up to 389hz and see
 

rhumbagirl

Senior Member
All the toms and snare it's the stock heads, they are 12 years old but I didn't played the drum very much.. so I guess they are still ok.

Snare: Resonant = Stock drum head Evans clear (probably G1)
Snare Batter = New G1 coated

Hi-Tom Resonant = Stock drum head Evans clear (probably G1)
Hi-Tom Batter = Stock drum head Evans coated (probably G1)

Same thing for the floor tom.

the new G1 is thicker a bit then then original stock Evans head that came with that drum.

This is a 13 seconds video sound test of my snare and toms.

I think they sound in tune, to my ears at least. I think it would help to state for others that you're going for a higher pitched jazz tone here.
 

yammyfan

Senior Member
I think they sound in tune, to my ears at least. I think it would help to state for others that you're going for a higher pitched jazz tone here.
Agreed. They don't sound badly tuned, just tuned high. I know that jazz favours higher tunings, but just how much makes me wonder.

I suppose you could bring the floor tom up to 85 Hz. Smaller floor toms sound good there. That would be 149 over 149 at each lug, top and bottom, for a fully resonant drum.

EDIT: corrected the numbers.
 
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Auspicious

Well-known member
Ok if you want to listen to the resonant head of my snare in the video bellow. The last frequencies that the tune-bot was able to pick up were around 350hz or so, but it quicky lost the ability of capturing anything above that, my ear was used to crank the snare to 389hz. The center of the reso is chocked.. right?

https://youtu.be/q-5C2VcFngk
 

yammyfan

Senior Member
It didn't look like you were muting the opposite head when you were striking that drum in the video. It's hard to get an accurate reading that way.

I recommend taking the drum off the stand and tuning it on a soft surface like a carpet or a bed. You want to completely mute the opposing head.

Also, it looks like you have the 'Gig' model. If I understand correctly, you find the one lug that is at the desired frequency and then use the 'Difference' button to filter for that frequency. I think it would be a good idea to move the Tune-Bot around the drum after you have used the Difference button on the lugs to ensure that they're even without using the Difference button. As somebody pointed out, sometimes holding the Tune-Bot in your hand just above the head at the lug's location will give you an accurate reading.

It's a nuisance at first I know but you'll get really good at using it and soon you'll be able to fully tune a drum in five minutes, if you're not there already.
 

yammyfan

Senior Member
Why is the fundamental missing for the snare and toms? Are we supposed to guess these??
Good question. I can tell that the floor tom is 72Hz using 125 at the lugs top and bottom. The other tom would be around 101 Hz which would give you 177 at the lugs.

The math is fundamental note x1.75 to give you the frequency at each lug when you want both heads tuned equally for a fully resonant drum.
 

rhumbagirl

Senior Member
Good question. I can tell that the floor tom is 72Hz using 125 at the lugs top and bottom. The other tom would be around 101 Hz which would give you 177 at the lugs.

The math is fundamental note x1.75 to give you the frequency at each lug when you want both heads tuned equally for a fully resonant drum.
According to the TuneBot tuning guide, the ratio of lug frequency to fundamental is in the range 1.6 to 1.9 "depending on the specific drum".
 

yammyfan

Senior Member
According to the TuneBot tuning guide, the ratio of lug frequency to fundamental is in the range 1.6 to 1.9 "depending on the specific drum".
That's true.

The math checks out: 2nd Octave A = 110 Hz. 110 x 1.75 = 192.5 Hz at each lug for a wide-open drum.

I tune wide-open sometimes to avoid choking drums, especially when tuning a stranger's kit.
 

Auspicious

Well-known member
It didn't look like you were muting the opposite head when you were striking that drum in the video. It's hard to get an accurate reading that way.

I recommend taking the drum off the stand and tuning it on a soft surface like a carpet or a bed. You want to completely mute the opposing head.

Also, it looks like you have the 'Gig' model. If I understand correctly, you find the one lug that is at the desired frequency and then use the 'Difference' button to filter for that frequency. I think it would be a good idea to move the Tune-Bot around the drum after you have used the Difference button on the lugs to ensure that they're even without using the Difference button. As somebody pointed out, sometimes holding the Tune-Bot in your hand just above the head at the lug's location will give you an accurate reading.

It's a nuisance at first I know but you'll get really good at using it and soon you'll be able to fully tune a drum in five minutes, if you're not there already.
Yes it was 100% muffled, there was a t-shirt between the mount and the batter head, I swear it.

I agree about moving the tune-bot I will try, that exercice was more to show that it can't pick up frequencies very well above 275 hz. There is a video, it was to provide an evidence. To crank the head to around 350hz I was able to pick up a frequency and used the difference button to equalize the rest of the lugs, with muffling. But over 350, I was not able to pick up any frequencies.

I will try to move the thing, I saw a video about that previously.
 

Auspicious

Well-known member
Another one, from the Artist page:

View attachment 94732
Thanks, I saw the John Riley tuning previously in the artist section. I have a theory that he could have done something like it did, tuned with the lug frequency then tuned by ear just after to get the right fundamental note he wanted.

Instead of providing conflicting information, he didn't published the fundamental note.

Just a wild theory.

***

I tried playing with my drum a bit and it's very very nice now, raising the resonant head of the snare helped, the sound of it is good and the rebound not to bad at all. I will publish a short video sequence of my very basic jazz playing later, for you to ear the tuning experience. 😄
 

yammyfan

Senior Member
I tried playing with my drum a bit and it's very very nice now, raising the resonant head of the snare helped, the sound of it is good and the rebound not to bad at all. I will publish a short video sequence of my very basic jazz playing later, for you to ear the tuning experience. 😄
Awesome! Looking forward to hearing what you have done. (y)
 

Auspicious

Well-known member
Awesome! Looking forward to hearing what you have done. (y)
I will do the video this week, I am very tired right today, I also need to save the settings of my current tuning with the tune-bot, backing up the fundamental notes and the lug frequencies.

There is base point at least now.

I don't regret the purchase of the tune-bot, but I should have picked the Studio version instead of the Gig version. It's not really the end of the world, the only limitation of the Gig version was with the very high resonant head of my snare which was fairly easy to tune by ear.

It would pick up the frequencies up to 350 or 355 hz (with difficulties) and by using the difference mode to tune around that specific lug.. the rest was done by ear.
 
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