Tune-Bot your method

cbphoto

Gold Member
In a way its similar. You tune a guitar by ear using harmonics. Fifth fret low E = A (open second string). If you do the same thing at each lug it works. The problem is there is no note, so it is harder to find, and you have to find it 6, 8, or 10 times.
I meant, some peeps might think you simply attach a widget and turn a screw.

Then there are tympani players who can tune their gear by ear while the rest of the orchestra is playing.
Pro Level: 10.
 
That's my next move, I have an example I want to copy.

My knowledge about Motown music is very limited currently, I think about the Jackson 5 and James Jamerson on the bass. If you want, feel free to share an example, I would be glad to listen to it and to expand my knowledge about the great Motown music and their drummers.
Martha and the Vandella's "Nowhere to Run" is what you need.
 

Auspicious

Well-known member
I am also seeing a lot of the apparent frustration @Auspicious is.
hehehe you should see me now.

Over 275hz the tunebot is providing false readings all the time,, it's can't keep up over 275 HZ.. I am trying to adjust the bottom head to 360Hz and it simply can,t keep up. I'll have to do it by ear, pretty sure
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Yeah, with a whammy bar it will, but shouldn't THAT much, not so much a quick fine tune won't fix.
If it does, you got other issues to address.
With drum heads I was noticing it more...tap (around), tap, tap, adjust, tap, adjust again...etc. while wanting to keep the overall pitch.
Course drums is all new to me. Different animal.
It's all about distances. 6 lugs can be checked at opposites and in a triangle. If the opposite changes as you turn the key, check the triangle. Same with 8 lugs, opposites and a square. If the opposite changes when you turn the key, check the mids of the square.

If you can get half the lugs in tune with themselves, the triangle or square, you are almost there.
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
I meant, some peeps might think you simply attach a widget and turn a screw.

Then there are tympani players who can tune their gear by ear while the rest of the orchestra is playing.
Pro Level: 10.
I played tympani in high school and only had 2 drums which meant changing at least 1 mid-song. I learned to listen to the band/ orchestra and tune to them
 

Auspicious

Well-known member
So what were the final fundamentals and resonance you ended up with, Auspicious?
Hello !

Well this time I really understood how to use the tables and the tune bot, I am going to write a small paper on the subject including my difficulties and how to overcome them, the whole process and my observations.

My latest tuning is Test-02



I used the tune-bot calculator to get the fundamental notes for the toms and the individual snare table to pick the fundamental note for the snare.

For the snare, I used the piano to pick my favorite fundamental note, the note that would blend with the toms, not an independent note for the snare.

The fundamental note I picked for the snare is F3 - 157 hz

***
Now, I don't like F2# for the floor tom, I want to lower it to F2 instead.
 

OSDrums

Well-known member
hehehe you should see me now.

Over 275hz the tunebot is providing false readings all the time,, it's can't keep up over 275 HZ.. I am trying to adjust the bottom head to 360Hz and it simply can,t keep up. I'll have to do it by ear, pretty sure
For higher tunings you can engage the filter function - read the manual for this. Is the 360 Hz a snare reso? These can be tricky, but I was able to tune mine to 398 Hz with the tunebot studio.
 

Auspicious

Well-known member
For higher tunings you can engage the filter function - read the manual for this. Is the 360 Hz a snare reso? These can be tricky, but I was able to tune mine to 398 Hz with the tunebot studio.
hem I have the tune bot gig, it has the difference mode but this mode can't be used to reach a specific frequency, only to compare frequency from a fixed benchmark point. Unfortunate but not the end of the world, I was able to pick up some frequencies in the +-300s for the resonant head of the snear, I did the rest by ear up to the right note at around 360hz

I just tried the drum a bit, the high tom is VERY nice but I don't like the snare, the head is too hard in the middle of the batter and the rebound is not very good, I have to hit hard to get a nice crack.. now it has the exact right note, it's tuned but the rebound sucks.

What should I do when the center of the snare is not responsive like that?

The floor tom with the new note F, there is something wrong again, the fundamental was F# at the begining and it sounded wrong, it's still sounds wrong with the note F. Both notes were validated with the tune bot and the piano, F# was spot on and same thing for F.

So I reached some notes with a decent precision, but the interval is wrong again.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
These kinds of devices, including drum dials, never include the fact that, over time, drum heads stretch out and lose their Omni-directional tensile coefficient.
I think as a starting point they have their place. It gets everything pretty even from the get go. It seems like that is the biggest issue people have. Or at least how I'm interpreting it.

I agree it's not great. But I personally dont think the wrinkle method is either, but some folks love it.
 

Auspicious

Well-known member
I think the Anti-Tune-bot crowd might be into something here.

I changed all my tuning by ear, it took 10 minutes and the drum sounds fine. I unchoked the snare by playing with the logs of the batter head untill the middle of the drum was usable again and I reduced the resonant head quite a bit in order to get a response from the snares chains, they were like, dead.

Don't know what to think.. but it's way better now then previously.
 

rhumbagirl

Senior Member
I think the Anti-Tune-bot crowd might be into something here.

I changed all my tuning by ear, it took 10 minutes and the drum sounds fine. I unchoked the snare by playing with the logs of the batter head untill the middle of the drum was usable again and I reduced the resonant head quite a bit in order to get a response from the snares chains, they were like, dead.

Don't know what to think.. but it's way better now then previously.
That's audacious Auspicious! What kind of head do you have on the snare??
 

Auspicious

Well-known member
That's audacious Auspicious! What kind of head do you have on the snare??
All the toms and snare it's the stock heads, they are 12 years old but I didn't played the drum very much.. so I guess they are still ok.

Snare: Resonant = Stock drum head Evans clear (probably G1)
Snare Batter = New G1 coated

Hi-Tom Resonant = Stock drum head Evans clear (probably G1)
Hi-Tom Batter = Stock drum head Evans coated (probably G1)

Same thing for the floor tom.

the new G1 is thicker a bit then then original stock Evans head that came with that drum.

This is a 13 seconds video sound test of my snare and toms.

 
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yammyfan

Senior Member
WAY too much is being made of the 'challenges' in using a Tune-Bot. It is VERY simple to use when you understand the basics and it crushes other devices when it comes to accuracy and utility.

1 - Take any drum you want to tune, mute one side (I tune on a carpeted floor) then loosen and finger tighten all of the tension rods.

2- Using a star pattern, turn each tension rod about half a turn, maybe add another 1/4 turn until you get some tone from the drum head.

3 - Clamp the Tune-Bot to the rim and tap about 1" from each lug to see where you're at versus where you want to be. Say you want each lug to be at 220 Hz and 4 out of the 6 say they're at 216 Hz, you can be pretty sure they're all around that frequency. You can turn on the filter to 'focus' the Tune-Bot on the frequencies around that 216 Hz. Check the 2 out of 6 that were reading strangely and you'll find they're pretty close, but a bit more off than the other 4.

4- Using very small turns (maybe 1/4 turns) bring all of the lugs up to the frequency you want them to be at. Better to tune UP to a frequency than DOWN.

TIP: move the Tune-Bot to a different location on the drum to double-check the accuracy of the readings. Sometimes moving the Tune-Bot to a different spot lets you hear each lug clearly without having to use the filter. I do this as a quality-check after I've brought all of the lugs up to where I want them to be.

5- Flip the drum over and repeat the above steps for the other head. I can tune a 12" tom in five minutes by doing this. It's not rocket science and it's not guesswork.

When you're done both heads, clamp the Tune-Bot to the rim on the batter side, pick up the drum and hold it by its mount and tap the head in the middle and make note of the reading that the Tune-Bot gives you. THIS is the fundamental frequency of the drum. If it's too high, loosen the lugs. If it's too low, tighten them. You can work pretty much exclusively on the batter side at this point.

It's not difficult to do and even if you're tuning by ear and using arbitrary frequencies, using the Tune-Bot to equalize each lug is STILL going to result in a better sounding drum. You don't HAVE to use a calculator or anything like that if you prefer to tune by ear.

I really hope this helps. It's frustrating when people give up on something when they're probably minutes away from mastering the darn thing. Stick with it and reap the rewards!
 
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yammyfan

Senior Member
All the toms and snare it's the stock heads, they are 12 years old but I didn't played the drum very much.. so I guess they are still ok.

Snare: Resonant = Stock drum head Evans clear (probably G1)
Snare Batter = New G1 coated

Hi-Tom Resonant = Stock drum head Evans clear (probably G1)
Hi-Tom Batter = Stock drum head Evans coated (probably G1)

Same thing for the floor tom.

the new G1 is thicker a bit then then original stock Evans head that came with that drum.

This is a 13 seconds video sound test of my snare and toms.

Man, those are crazily high-tuned drums. That floor tom, especially.

Just for the heck of it, try the 12" at 112 Hz and the floor tom at 73 Hz. Yes, those are the fundamental frequencies.

That means 168 over 202 (lug pitches) for the 12" and 110 over 131 for the floor tom.

Snare drum: try 300 over 392 and see what you think of that.
 

Auspicious

Well-known member
WAY too much is being made of the 'challenges' in using a Tune-Bot. It is VERY simple to use when you understand the basics and it crushes other devices when it comes to accuracy and utility.

1 - Take any drum you want to tune, mute one side (I tune on a carpeted floor) then loosen and finger tighten all of the tension rods. Done that

2- Using a star pattern, turn each tension rod about half a turn, maybe add another 1/4 turn until you get some tone from the drum head. Done that

3 - Clamp the Tune-Bot to the rim and tap about 1" from each lug to see where you're at versus where you want to be. Say you want each lug to be at 220 Hz and 4 out of the 6 say they're at 216 Hz, you can be pretty sure they're all around that frequency. You can turn on the filter to 'focus' the Tune-Bot on the frequencies around that 216 Hz. Check the 2 out of 6 that were reading strangely and you'll find they're pretty close, but a bit more off than the other 4. I can do that precicely.

4- Using very small turns (maybe 1/4 turns) bring all of the lugs up to the frequency you want them to be at. Better to tune UP to a frequency than DOWN. Ok

TIP: move the Tune-Bot to a different location on the drum to double-check the accuracy of the readings. Sometimes moving the Tune-Bot to a different spot lets you hear each lug clearly without having to use the filter. I do this as a quality-check after I've brought all of the lugs up to where I want them to be. I have not tried this

5- Flip the drum over and repeat the above steps for the other head. I can tune a 12" tom in five minutes by doing this. It's not rocket science and it's not guesswork. Yes it was easy, it took some day to figure out the fundamental note and the lugs frequency but I get it now.

When you're done both heads, clamp the Tune-Bot to the rim on the batter side, pick up the drum and hold it by its mount and tap the head in the middle and make note of the reading that the Tune-Bot gives you. THIS is the fundamental frequency of the drum. If it's too high, loosen the lugs. If it's too low, tighten them. You can work pretty much exclusively on the batter side at this point. I did exactly that and the notes were spot on.

It's not difficult to do and even if you're tuning by ear and using arbitrary frequencies, using the Tune-Bot to equalize each lug is STILL going to result in a better sounding drum. You don't HAVE to use a calculator or anything like that if you prefer to tune by ear.

I really hope this helps. It's frustrating when people give up on something when they're probably minutes away from mastering the damn thing. Stick with it and reap the rewards! I am not giving up.
See notes in red

I am pretty sure my results, the notes and frequency were close to spot on. BUT, the interval was wrong and the snare, choked with dead chains..

I don't know why.
 
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