Triplets

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
So I'm diving down the rabbit hole that is linear triplets and would really like other's experiences with them.

There's a lot of possibilities how linear trips can be played. Then add in different dynamic colorations and the possibilities explode.

I started practicing triplets a while ago but really didn't get far. I would start with my weak hand, then strong hand, then foot. LRK. My reasoning was that this was the hardest way for me at the time, so I usually go with the hard way is the best way.

I was never really happy with how they sat. They don't come naturally anyway, so I need work there. I'm hoping it will smooth me out.

I tried doing KLR, and that was better, but I still wasn't feeling it.

I'm interested in hearing anyone who cares to comment on their own personal triplet discoveries.
 
Cleaning up triplets is something I work on every now and then. Some are still pretty bumpy but it's getting better. I like a few ways of practicing those:
- I pick the first note and vary the other two. For myself, I chose the order R, L, K, H (Hi-Hat with foot) to keep things in order. Starting with R: RLK, RLH, RKL, RKH, RHL, RHK. Then LRK, LRH, LKR, LKH, LHR, LHK. Then KRL, KRH, KLR,... (24 combinations in total)
- You can of course do doubles too: RRL, RRK, RRH...
- Or two instruments on one particular beat: R+L, K, H or R+K, R, L...
- Another thing is leaving out one note when working on a specific one. So if it's LRK, you can go L-K, LR-, -RK
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Cool idea incorporating the hi hat foot as an equal member. I've been sort of keeping time on the quarters with my hi hat.

I could spend years working through you last post lol.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
I love these things. I use them a lot, but they are pretty prevalent in metal.

There are so many variations to this, not all trips. They still get that rolling feel though, a la Moby Dick.

RLK, RLKK, RLRK, so on and so forth. I like to do groups of 2s (RLKK), 3s (RLRKKK), and 4s (RLRLKKKK) between feet and hands. 3s are my favorite. I use a double pedal, but you could easily substitute the hat for left kick.
 

beatdat

Senior Member
Cool idea incorporating the hi hat foot as an equal member. I've been sort of keeping time on the quarters with my hi hat.
Playing a constant quarter note pulse on the hi-hat with my foot has really helped me play to a click and improve my feel. Try making that a priority for a while and see if it helps.
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
I sort of think of them as rather foundation groupings. Rather than trying to worry about actually playing every permutation of kit combinations in groups of 3 I will tend to make it musical and try to be spontaneous. The goal for me isn't to regurgitate things I've played 4000 times, but rather to "master" the groupings and divisions that I can use in whatever combination because my spaces are correct.

One of my favorite things to muck about with is putting on strait-rock style stuff or hip hop works too... Basically the song is just my click track and I play trips (or whatever subdivision I've decided on) within the framework of that song. You can play them "straight" or swung, and it's also helpful to move in and out of divisions. Play trips for a few "bars" then play straight ahead 8ths for the next few measures. I tend to try to go with the song changes and play other stuff around them but focus on a set or specific division in one way or other.
 

newoldie

Silver Member
I'm a big fan of paradiddle and double paradiddles on different instruments of the drumset, accenting different notes, using bass drum for some notes.
These work well on some fills for certain types of music, when single stick paradiddles can use some spice.

Constantly working on these and find they really help overall stick and around the kit coordination.
 

Steady Freddy

Pioneer Member
I play em RLK with the right alternating between snare and floor tom. Getting out of it you'll need a double on the kick on the last beat of the triplet and then then on the down beat of the next beat. If I'm playing a full measure fill, it will be three beats of triplets and then a straight sixteenth note pick up or the ba- boom on kick leading into the next measure, Hope that makes sense.
 

cornelius

Silver Member
I used to only play them a couple different ways, but now I like playing all of the different permutations - it changes from a static lick into a more musical phrase.
 

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
I only practice swing, 5/8 and 7/8, so it's pretty natural.

I think it's just a matter of doing it enough.

Work on your triplets and stop doing anything else that you don't have to do.
 

brentcn

Platinum Member
1. Keep time with the left foot. Yes, this is difficult, and requires a bit of balancing.
2. Practice ALL permutations: RLK, KRL, LKR, LRK, KLR, RKL. Then, practice these combinations: RLKLRK, KRLKLR, LKLRKR.
3. Practice all permutations as triplets. Play one measure of triplets, then one measure of time, and so on. Keep time with left foot.
4. Practice all permutations as sixteenths. Play one measure of sixteenths, then one measure of time, and so on. You will need to add a note in order to play a complete measure of sixteenths, for example: RLKR LKRL KRLK RLKL. Keep time with left foot.
 

SmoothOperator

Gold Member
In the past I've done the permutations of 12/8 bell patterns, these days I usually just practice the long and short bell, it really helps the triplet feel to have some cross beat accent patterns in there. It also helps a lot to count through all the way to 12.

Another useful pattern is to alternate between triplets and sixteenths, keeping he same quarter pulse. |(LRL)3(RLRL)4(RLR)3(LRLR)4:|, where I've notated the subdivisions and the sticking, should be played straight no swinging.
 

mrfingers

Senior Member
I find it easier to use my rt. foot starting each triplet and also easier to use groups of threes, sixes for my triplets. Sometimes have to modify them to end on the appropriate hand for crashes , etc. Often I ”cross the bar” with triplets( 1-2-3-4-1-2-3). Fun with flams starting out the strokes, too.
 
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I use them as a warm up, alternating between RLK and LRK at varying tempos, and also crossing over Bonham style just to add something different. I really like incorporating them into fills and often use low tempo linear triplettes in fills with my church group.
 

bud7h4

Silver Member
I'm interested in hearing anyone who cares to comment on their own personal triplet discoveries.
This is nothing but Kick, R, L triplets . . . . . . .
One of the most important lessons I've ever watched. The entire video is brilliant! What Jojo says at 16:35 changed the way I approach learning, practicing and playing.

 
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rustyfingers

Senior Member
This is nothing but Kick, R, L triplets . . . . . . .
One of the most important lessons I've ever watched. The entire video is brilliant! What Jojo says at 16:35 changed the way I approach learning, practicing and playing.

I was going to post this exact video. I wish they had the whole thing because at some point he removes his coat so there is more to the video... somewhere.
 

bud7h4

Silver Member
I was going to post this exact video. I wish they had the whole thing because at some point he removes his coat so there is more to the video... somewhere.
That might be the entire video. Notice I have it starting at the 14:50 mark for the triplets "solo".
 

Good Karma

Well-known member
My left hand is weaker and i'm always trying to improve on this. so starting with my left hand can be a struggle. For whatever reason playing alternating triples is easier for me. (meaning, KRL KLR KRL KLR)


This is what ive been working on, Flam triples, hope it makes sense. Sorry, i dont have sheet music for this exercise.

Beat 1
lR R L R
1 e & a

Beats 2 & 3(sextuples) KRL KLR KRL KLR

Beat 4
K lR R L
4 e & a

Note: lR is a flam
One benefit, it changes the sound. Kinda sounds like you're doing a crossovers.
Starting with your K, you dont have that awkwardness of put two K's together
 
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basset52

Senior Member
I've been working on them for well over a year now 2- 3 times a week for 20 to 30 mins at a time - RLK, with the aim to get a fluent roll around the kit, but a while ago I reached a plateau and can't seem to get any faster , so moving around the kit , snare to Rack to floor is still quite slow. I see others doing it very fast! Very frustrating for me ! I use a digital metronome so I can get the spacing right. I'm beginning to think I'm just not capable of getting any faster! I recently decided to go RLK on snare to LRK on rack tom then RLK on floor tom to see if this would help with speed and fluency, it didn't seem to. Its been a very frustrating 12 months - part of me says at 67 years old and basically playing for fun , just give up, but the other part of me wants to continue the challenge!
 
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