Triple Flange or Die Cast Hoop?

mikyok

Platinum Member
I'm treating myself to Worldmax NOB snare, found 2 models in a clearance sale for just over £200, never had a brass snare so this is a low risk gamble.

Both 14x6.5" one has triple flange hoops, one has die cast hoops. Is there any sound difference between the two? All my snares are triple flange.

All advice much appreciated as always.

Mike
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
I was a die hard, die cast hoop user for my snare drum. For all my life. Then one day a few years ago I woke up and didn't prefer the die cast tone anymore. It seems to stifle the drum a bit. I'd get a set of DC if you never had a snare with them before. But I would also get the TF for the drum, why not? I had DC on a BB I had, brass drum, and that was the drum that made me realize I now prefer TF. Personal taste. I don't like that the DC hoops are so heavy...for tone, not weight. I don't like that the DC seems to force focus the drum. I do like the rimclick tone of the DC. TF are lighter, less expensive, and don't limit the overtones. What I don't like about the DC hoops could be the very same things that people want from DC hoops. Again, personal taste.
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
I have 2.3mm triple flange hoops (Pearl, of course). I find die cast a bit choking. They can also introduce a rigid feel. Triple flange hoops are less imposing in my experience.
 

AzHeat

Platinum Member
To me it depends on the shell material and size of the drum. For example, on my bronze snare, I much prefer the DC, but on my cast aluminum, I prefer a more open sound. I don't have the TF on that one, but the Gretsch 302. The aluminum shell is naturally more controlled than the Bronze, so I prefer to let that one breath a bit more. On smaller/shallower snares, I also for the most part prefer thicker TF hoops vs DC on the deeper drums. On the other hand, I'm not wild about ping snares, so to use Larry's BB example, the DC would be ideal on that snare. There's just way too much ping to the BB for my liking.

...running and ducking for cover....
 
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Rotarded

Senior Member
I don't care for die cast hoops on wood snares, but they do work well on metal (brass in my experience) snares at taming some of the high pitched overtones. I swapped the original die casts off of my 6.5" Black Beauty (also a generous gift from Larry) with triple flange hoops once. I put the die casts back on the next day.
 

fobz

Well-known member
Worldmax brass snare at that price definitely isn't a gamble ;)
I would opt for triple flanged as brass has such a good balanced tone you don't really need to control the overtones with a die cast hoop, but I'm sure die cast would sound great too - you can't really go wrong here. Just decide if you want a bit more resonance or more of a fat, controlled sound. The only advantage with triple flanged is you can always dampen some of the resonance if you need to, but you can't mix it back in with die cast hoops...
Enjoy.
 

ineedaclutch

Platinum Member
I would get the die-cast hoops considering your other snares have tf. Swap as you see fit if they are the same lug count.
 

TK-421

Senior Member
This one is easy. Since it sounds like both snares are priced the same or nearly the same, get the die cast hoops. Die cast hoops are worth way more than triple flanged, so if you don’t like them, sell the die cast, buy some triple flanged and pocket the difference. In the US, 14" cast hoops sell from about $40-60 a piece, while triple flange hoops sell for like $15-25 each.

BTW, all of my snares have either die cast or those heavy Gretsch 302 hoops, which have a similar feel to die cast. That's definitely my preference, as I like how they give snares a certain "presence" to them. A more exacting sound that offers beefier rim shots and a bit more punch than flanged. Die cast hoops do tend to have a bit more height to them, sticking up just a tad higher over the head. You may like or dislike this. Personally, I love this, as I play mostly rim shots and this makes it easier to find the sweet spot (at least once you get used to cast hoops). These days, whenever I do play a snare with triple flanged, I have a harder time finding that sweet spot, and rim shots feel just a little more awkward to me as a result.
 

NouveauCliche

Senior Member
This one is easy. Since it sounds like both snares are priced the same or nearly the same, get the die cast hoops. Die cast hoops are worth way more than triple flanged, so if you don’t like them, sell the die cast, buy some triple flanged and pocket the difference. In the US, 14" cast hoops sell from about $40-60 a piece, while triple flange hoops sell for like $15-25 each.

BTW, all of my snares have either die cast or those heavy Gretsch 302 hoops, which have a similar feel to die cast. That's definitely my preference, as I like how they give snares a certain "presence" to them. A more exacting sound that offers beefier rim shots and a bit more punch than flanged. Die cast hoops do tend to have a bit more height to them, sticking up just a tad higher over the head. You may like or dislike this. Personally, I love this, as I play mostly rim shots and this makes it easier to find the sweet spot (at least once you get used to cast hoops). These days, whenever I do play a snare with triple flanged, I have a harder time finding that sweet spot, and rim shots feel just a little more awkward to me as a result.

+1 for this post.

Starting with die cast would be my preference - a triple flanged or S hoop is easy to add later for less $$ than going from a TF to DC.
 

Cmdr. Ross

Silver Member
Die cast on the snare batter, triple flange on the snare side of my Gretsch mahogany shelled. The crack is unreal & it makes my snare all about combat & not conformity.
As for the toms, I'm not too concerned about that. Triple flange does well.
 

NouveauCliche

Senior Member
Die cast on the snare batter, triple flange on the snare side of my Gretsch mahogany shelled. The crack is unreal & it makes my snare all about combat & not conformity.
As for the toms, I'm not too concerned about that. Triple flange does well.

That's like the Copeland signature - I always wanted to try that.
 

mikyok

Platinum Member
This one is easy. Since it sounds like both snares are priced the same or nearly the same, get the die cast hoops. Die cast hoops are worth way more than triple flanged, so if you don’t like them, sell the die cast, buy some triple flanged and pocket the difference. In the US, 14" cast hoops sell from about $40-60 a piece, while triple flange hoops sell for like $15-25 each.

Wise words, just bought the die cast hoops model. Both models were exactly the same price.

It's black nickel hardware but I have my Mapex Deep Forest Walnut has black nickel hardware and triple flange hoops. I'd totally forgot about it! Best of both worlds!
 

TK-421

Senior Member
Wise words, just bought the die cast hoops model. Both models were exactly the same price.

It's black nickel hardware but I have my Mapex Deep Forest Walnut has black nickel hardware and triple flange hoops. I'd totally forgot about it! Best of both worlds!
Awesome, congratulations! I'd be curious to know what you think of the die cast hoops. I love them! And if your Mapex has the same number of lugs as the WorldMax, you can also swap those hoops and see which combo works the best for you.
 

mikyok

Platinum Member
Awesome, congratulations! I'd be curious to know what you think of the die cast hoops. I love them! And if your Mapex has the same number of lugs as the WorldMax, you can also swap those hoops and see which combo works the best for you.

Cheers man, both snares are 10 lug so I'll have a play and find a good combination.

I'll put pics up once it arrives. It's a Ludwig black magic with a different badge on it.
 

Winston_Wolf

Platinum Member
Cheers man, both snares are 10 lug so I'll have a play and find a good combination.

I'll put pics up once it arrives. It's a Ludwig black magic with a different badge on it.

I had a Black Magic but sold it once I got a Black Beauty. Both with die cast hoops, both sound fantastic. I have no doubt you'll enjoy your new drum!
 
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