Trick pedal- I guess it’s not for me...

Jbravo

Senior Member
Awhile back I bought a used Trick Pro1 V Bigfoot single pedal. They are beautifully made, solid as a rock pedals that exude quality. So I was smitten. It was easy to play fast double stokes, and very smooth.

Eventually, as the glow subsided I realized that it felt like I really had to stomp my foot to keep the volume level with the other drums. I’m not a heavy hitter, I only have broken one stick since I started playing again, and that cracked along the grain way up near the tip, so I think it was more of a stick issue than a player issue.

Anyway I put the cheaper pedal back on that came with my atlas standard hardware pack and bam! everything sounded right again.

Long story short- I listed my Trick on reverb last night, sold it for my asking price this morning, and bought a mint used Ludwig Atlas Pro double pedal for that same amount an hour later.

I guess maybe an old dog shouldn’t try a new trick. Pedal anyway...

But I really liked the leather disc I put on the Trick beater- I may have to do some beater shopping when the new pedals arrive.
 

Red Menace

Platinum Member
I have heard some people have problems with direct drive pedals and getting the power and volume they want. I have been playing an Axis for years so I don't really think of it but I do notice when I play a chain driven pedal that it feels like I get a little more attack and volume.

Bo had a story about buying one, spending forever to get is set up and it played every bit as well as his $99 Iron Cobra Jr.
 

Jbravo

Senior Member
I have heard some people have problems with direct drive pedals and getting the power and volume they want. I have been playing an Axis for years so I don't really think of it but I do notice when I play a chain driven pedal that it feels like I get a little more attack and volume.

Bo had a story about buying one, spending forever to get is set up and it played every bit as well as his $99 Iron Cobra Jr.

Now that’s funny! And like most funny things has an element of truth.
 

dwsabianguy

Senior Member
That's been my experience with direct drive pedals in general: Really fast and super controlled strokes, but not a whole lot of power behind them. Since I'm not in a death metal band, I think I'll stick with my old-school single-chain 5000s for now.
 

Jbravo

Senior Member
Yeah me too. I sold my 5000’s with my previous kit, but I’m looking forward to trying the Ludwig’s. And if I get a wild hair to try something new they come with two different lengths of chain and straps as an alternative.
 

AzHeat

Platinum Member
I had the same issue with my Axis longboards, but not the short or my Yamaha DD. It’s more of a longboard thing than direct drive.
 

bud7h4

Silver Member
Trick felt light-hitting to me too. I think their beaters might be too light perhaps.
My Axis A21 and A-Longboard both hit hard, but Axis beaters are about the same weight as the new Tama beaters.
I have to admit though, when I switch to my Speed Cobra pedals there's no denying the increase in power, they are like hammers.
 

beyondbetrayal

Platinum Member
I've played almost every DD pedal out there and there is a bit of a learning curve, and that includes getting used to the volume/feel/power.

I usually have a mic or trigger at shows, but after about 12 years of using direct drive I bought some cheap clearance chain pedals by one of the drum companies for about $120 or the pair...

I can't believe how much harder they hit. They are quite enjoyable to play. BUT, I guarantee I couldn't play at the speeds I played at. Also, heel toe is out of the question.

There is a trade off either way. But feel is a very personal thing. Heavier beaters, beater weights, changing settings to have more throw. etc. There are things that can be done.. Try raising the beater shaft a bit higher.. They all get more volume but change the leverage.
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
Now that’s funny! And like most funny things has an element of truth.

It is true! My entire "try a new pedal" history has been realizing I'v been making all of these pedals feel like my old Flexi Flyer (which I still have), or some old Camco variant (which is what the DW5000 is based off of). So I'm just gonna stick with those. In fact, I went even older school with my DW5000 and now have one without a plate, and my Flexi Flyer rides along as spare.

But - I had no problem making that Trick pedal feel like what I used to play. Maybe that's what you could've done? I always take the new pedal side-by-side with the old one, and start tweaking to make it feel the same. All those newfangled pedals have so many adjustments that it's not a hard thing to do. But congrats on discovering what I did!
 

Jbravo

Senior Member
Yeah, I think I’ll really like the atlas pedal. The reviews are good, and I’m expecting it’ll be similar to my 5000’s. And my OCD is supportive of it being the same brand as all my other hardware...?
 

beyondbetrayal

Platinum Member
It is true! My entire "try a new pedal" history has been realizing I'v been making all of these pedals feel like my old Flexi Flyer (which I still have), or some old Camco variant (which is what the DW5000 is based off of). So I'm just gonna stick with those. In fact, I went even older school with my DW5000 and now have one without a plate, and my Flexi Flyer rides along as spare.

But - I had no problem making that Trick pedal feel like what I used to play. Maybe that's what you could've done? I always take the new pedal side-by-side with the old one, and start tweaking to make it feel the same. All those newfangled pedals have so many adjustments that it's not a hard thing to do. But congrats on discovering what I did!


Hahahaha, this is so true.. Give me 10 pedals, I'll find a favorite, but then I go to another and I'll enjoy it, why, because they are the same.

I have the same issue with my snare drums.. A few weeks ago I bought a bunch of new heads, all different styles, some single, some double ply. put them on some wood, brass, steel snares and tuned them all. I wanted to try them all side by side and realized they ALL sounded about the same. I guess I have a snare "sound" stuck in my head I go for.
 

bermuda

Drummerworld Pro Drummer - Administrator
Staff member
It's a curious pedal. I endorsed it for 4 or 5 years, and loved it. One day, it didn't feel the same anymore. It wasn't responsive and didn't feel good to my foot. I brought out a new pedal, and it was the same. I had the old (original) pedal re-habbed by Trick, but it never felt the same again either. Very strange.

I transitioned to the Taye Metalworks pedal, which was very adjustable and felt great. I only terminated my deal when Taye USA closed their doors pending a new distribution deal. They had basically disappeared, and I didn't know what the future held for them or my endorsement.

I've been using the Atlas pedal ever since, and it feels just as good as the Taye.

Bermuda
 

beatdat

Senior Member
Glad I saw this thread.

I've been pretty happy with my TAMA SC pedals, but have been interested in a DD pedal. Seeing that TAMA now makes one, I'm tempted to look into it.

But, after reading that there is a marked difference between DD pedals and other pedals, I have my doubts.

Question, seeing that DD pedals seem to sacrifice power/volume for speed, which in general is harder to develop proficiently? Is it easier to develop power/volume or is it easier to develop speed? I'm told my foot is pretty powerful, but developing speed has been a slow process. I'm not displeased with the gains I've made, but I do want to get faster. I'm tempted to keep working on speed with my current pedals, but I'm wondering what your thoughts on this are. I really don't want to lose any power in my playing.
 

AzHeat

Platinum Member
It’s less about direct drive, then the longboard vs short thing. I have had Axis long and short. Both were DD. The longboard drove me nuts, where the short was awesome. I’ve also had both the Yamaha 9 series in chain and DD. Couldn’t really decide which I liked best. Both were super nice. Having said this, the Tama SC and Mapex Falcon, both have medium length footboards and both are killer. They are also chain drive, so maybe a combination of the two. I just found that with DD and longboard, I couldn’t get enough pedal height to control the pedal efficiency. Fly like the wind, yes. Control, no.
 

Fred D

Pioneer Member
I have a Trick Pro 1V pedal. Hate it!!! I stick with my DW 9000s.
 

dwdrummerky

Senior Member
I had a similar experience with a new Pearl DD Double. Looked great, all kinds of adjustments, but could not get it to feel right. Tried long/short boards, different beaters, cam adjustments... nothing would get that thing feeling right.

Sold it a bought a new DW 9002 with Extended footboard, added the trick linkage and bam! Best pedals out there IMO.
 

Jbravo

Senior Member
The DW 9000 was the other pedal I was looking at. I guess I went with the Atlas because they seem a similar quality, and being a Ludwig fan put me over the edge.
 

Jbravo

Senior Member
Glad I saw this thread.

I've been pretty happy with my TAMA SC pedals, but have been interested in a DD pedal. Seeing that TAMA now makes one, I'm tempted to look into it.

But, after reading that there is a marked difference between DD pedals and other pedals, I have my doubts.

Question, seeing that DD pedals seem to sacrifice power/volume for speed, which in general is harder to develop proficiently? Is it easier to develop power/volume or is it easier to develop speed? I'm told my foot is pretty powerful, but developing speed has been a slow process. I'm not displeased with the gains I've made, but I do want to get faster. I'm tempted to keep working on speed with my current pedals, but I'm wondering what your thoughts on this are. I really don't want to lose any power in my playing.

I think speed is harder to develop, but I don’t want to have to push too hard for volume, since speed is a lot about not being tense. The problem may have been the longer board, but I’ve never played a direct drive short board, so I can’t give an opinion on that. For the time being I’ll just stick with chain drive.
 

K Chez

Member
It’s less about direct drive, then the longboard vs short thing. I have had Axis long and short. Both were DD. The longboard drove me nuts, where the short was awesome. I’ve also had both the Yamaha 9 series in chain and DD. Couldn’t really decide which I liked best. Both were super nice. Having said this, the Tama SC and Mapex Falcon, both have medium length footboards and both are killer. They are also chain drive, so maybe a combination of the two. I just found that with DD and longboard, I couldn’t get enough pedal height to control the pedal efficiency. Fly like the wind, yes. Control, no.

I'm in full agreement with this^. Had good speed with the Axis, but can't get the foot board height high enough. Decided to try modding my Powershifter Eliminators to direct drive and boom! Problem solved. I was getting some flutter with the chain on fast punk-style doubles, but with the Axis the return felt slow and had no power. Interested to see if a short board on the Axis would be better.
 

Attachments

  • 20190130_155933_sm.jpg
    20190130_155933_sm.jpg
    448.6 KB · Views: 274
Top