Traditional Vs. Matched

JPW

Silver Member
Does anyone else than other drummers care what grip you use? (Thanks to Igoe for pointing this out =P)
 

Boomka

Platinum Member
Does anyone else than other drummers care what grip you use? (Thanks to Igoe for pointing this out =P)
Do most drummers even care? Very few of the guys I know could give a toss. We're way more interested in what brand of cymbals/sticks/heads a guy plays. That's a serious issue.
 

JPW

Silver Member
Do most drummers even care? Very few of the guys I know could give a toss. We're way more interested in what brand of cymbals/sticks/heads a guy plays. That's a serious issue.
Heh yeah, true. =) Sometimes I wonder if we are just too lost in the details and really miss the big picture. Technique is a nice thing to discuss if we first have somekind of idea what we want to do with it and WHY. I don't think the 'why' cares what the method of (or brand of the instrument) producing the sound is if it's the right sound in the right place.

Then again, if you are hurting yourself with any of these techniques of course you should change something. But I have heard tendonitis and carpel tunnels and tennis elbows linked to each and every one of these grips so I don't think it's really a matter of grip but what is the philosophy in the stroking itself.
 

jjmason777

Senior Member
There are videos of Buddy using matched right here on this website. He used it in solos here and there, flipping the stick over and using the butt end for tom fills and cymbal crashes, just like Steve Smith does.

Ironically, I just saw a video of Led Zeppelin from 1968 or 1969 on VH1 Classic, where they are lip syncing to You Shook Me for The Beat Club, and John Bonham is playing traditional grip for the first half of the song!

I'm trying to find it online to post a link to it. It looked very weird.
Here's a link to the video I mentioned earlier. Scroll down on the page until you see it. They removed the audio, but this is the only footage I know of that shows Bonham playing traditional grip. On a borrowed kit no less! Enjoy!
http://www.tightbutloose.co.uk/tblweb09/?p=4816
 

jc28

Junior Member
I am a firm believer in to each his own. I play traditional, I play in a Power Trio and have never had any problem getting power out of my left hand. But that is just me. I set my gear up to play traditional. I have noticed playing sets that were set up by a Matched player a little less comfortable(especially electronic),but not really a problem.

I did take a few years off from playing, I returned when I was asked to play a few dates with a band I played with in the eighties . Back then I played Matched grip with the trio, but I was taught to play traditional grip, which I used for everything except rock. When I picked the sticks back up to get into shape I automatically grabbed them with the Traditional grip.

I will say that I think teaching traditional grip to a beginner is the way to go. The main reason is it is easier to show the "fulcrum" and feel the "bounce" when they hold the stick with traditional grip in the left hand. When they really get that feeling, then they can apply it to the right hand. After they can create a good fulcrum with bounce in the right hand then I would introduce matched grip, after they mastered matched I would teach them the timpani grip(french). Then they could do whatever feels more comfortable. I use both grips (timpani and standard) with my right hand but I rarely change my left hand grip.
 

jc28

Junior Member
I've been wanting to switch permanently to traditional for a while, but never knew any resources to help me play smoothly in traditional. How do most people get the powerful rock sound like Neil Peart and other drummers that use traditional for rock/funk/metal styles?
I have found that I can get the same power from my left hand as my right in Traditional grip with just my wrist. However to learn to get your arm, shoulder and wrist into the action you should study the Moeller Technique. You should be able to find you tubes on it. I think JoJo mayers secret weapon dvd lays out all the techniques needed very clearly.
 

paradiddler

Senior Member
Unbelievable! Another 'traditional vs. matched' thread. Who'd a thunk it? I think I've just soiled myself.

A previous poster stole my thunder as far as Thomas Lang's revelation about switching to matched grip. There are few drummers who have the authority to say the things he said; he's one of those authorities.

That being said, c'mon guys, whatever's more fun, then do it! Whatever gets the job done, if you're comfortable with it, then go for it! I personally prefer matched grip, and overall if I had to choose a grip for the rest of my playing life and give up the other grip, I'd choose matched grip. It's simply a more flexible grip, in my opinion.

Traditional grip came about to solve a problem, and that's it. If the original marching drummers invented a way back then to hold the drum stationary and flat right in front of them, there would only be one grip. It wouldn't even be called 'matched grip', just 'the grip'. What other grip would there be?

I wrote an article way back when about my take on these two grips - I hope you read it. As far as myself, I play around with traditional grip because it does look pretty cool, and it does look like you know what you're doing! But it's all about the result in the end.

Get a grip! :)
 
Top